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Join SWE Today!

Experience success on your own termsWhen you join SWE you connect with a professional network of 27,000 enthusiastic, like-minded women engineers as well as professional development resources that members consistently rate as "excellent."

New Member Rates

Collegiate » $20/year
Professional » $120*
*Based upon professional membership type.

SWE Program Development Grants

With generous funding from the ExxonMobil Foundation, and The Ford Motor Company Foundation, these grants are available to support activities of SWE professional and collegiate sections, and SWE members at large, and to provide funding for various committees' pilot projects. 

Feel free to download and complete these proposal materials. For questions contact: pdg-chair@swe.org This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For more information visit the Program Development Grant section of MySWE Communities. Note: This resource is available to SWE members only.

Listen to the PDG webinar replay.  

E4C's Webinar Series Access

SWE members and swe.org site visitors can now access the webinar archive of the Engineering for Change Webinar Series in the below webinar tab. The Engineering for Change (E4C) Webinar Series promotes emerging ideas and connects you with a passionate community of engineers and development practitioners who want to make a difference. Each online seminar broadens your expertise, builds your knowledge of new opportunities and shows you how technology-based solutions are being used to address real-world challenges in under-served communities.

Give back. Change the world. Build your resume. Learn more about how SWE members are improving lives one project at a time, access the complimentary interactive E4C Webinar Series, or join E4C now and start making a difference today.

Need more information? Contact Lester McNair at SWE HQ or Carolyn Phillips with your questions and feedback.

Role Model

 

Role Model

SWE leadership statement on being a Good Role Model:
  • Mentoring within SWE
  • Appropriate professional behavior
  • Supporting decisions
  • Professional excellence
  • Demonstrates Integrity

Communication

SWE leadership competency model statement on Communication

  • Communicate plans and activities in a manner that supports strategies for teamwork.
  • Conflict resolution and management by skillfully settling differences in a positive and constructive manner.
  • Leverages diversity and differences by leading and supporting an inclusive environment. Seeks new perspectives to achieve the vision and mission of SWE.
  • Influencing others through coalition building, inviting new perspectives, and clearly articulating the goals of SWE.
  • Identify and collaborate with internal partners
  • Identify and collaborate with external partners.
  • Build relationships that support SWE's mission and strategic objectives.
  • Apply effective communication and interpersonal skills through actively listening to the needs of colleagues, sharing relevant information and expectations, and treating colleagues with respect.

Leadership Abilities

SWE leadership competency model statement on Leadership Abilities:
  • Developing and empowering others.
  • Visioning by taking the long view of the organization, building a shared vision for SWE members’ role, acting as a catalyst for organizational change, and inspiring others to succeed within SWE.
  • Provide and support an environment for continuous improvement.
  • Promote and support appropriate change as an essential part of SWE’s success as an organization.
  • Maintain a high standard of professionalism and ethics.
  • Be an advocate for the role of women in STEM.
  • Results oriented through delivering on strategic goals.
  • Evidence based decision making; using the best evidence available in making decisions that impact the organization.
  • Taking initiative and making smart risks through the encouragement of creative. Thinking, supporting and guiding new ideas, and empowering others to take risks.
  • Knowledgeable of change management strategies and processes.
  • Visioning by taking the long view of the organization, building a shared vision for SWE members’ role, acting as a catalyst for organizational change, and inspiring others to succeed within SWE.
  • Leverages diversity and differences by leading and supporting an inclusive environment.Seeks new perspectives to achieve the vision and mission.
  • Influencing others through coalition building, inviting new perspectives, an clearly articulating the goals of SWE
  • Identify and collaborate with internal partners.
  • Identify and collaborate with external partners
  • Build relationships that support SWE’s mission and strategic objectives
  • Apply effective communication and interpersonal skills through actively listening to the needs of colleagues, sharing relevant information and expectations, and testing colleagues with respect.

Self-Management & Development

SWE leadership competency model statement Self-Management & Development:
  • Pursuit of lifelong learning through the mastery of new knowledge, embracing new ideas, and shares new ideas.
  • Self-reflection and assessment through recognizing strengths and weaknesses, seeks feedback from others and learns from failure.
  • Tolerates ambiguity by taking priority changes and unforeseen developments in stride as well as leads with a firm sense of purpose in an environment of uncertainty.
  • Flexibility by being open to change and new information/perspectives.

Business Knowledge & Management

SWE leadership competency model statement on Business Knowledge & Management:
  • Strategic planning through the development of effective strategies consistent with the mission of SWE. Sees the big picture and understands how to determine organizational objectives and set priorities.
  • Manage finances of SWE to meet organizational needs.
  • Apply effective management skills (e.g., problem solving, interpersonal skills, delegation and supervision).
  • Professional knowledge and skills by being aware of industry changes, developments and emerging issues affecting women in STEM.

#AskSWE Tweetchat Frequently Asked Questions

What is the #AskSWE tweetchat?
A tweetchat is like a Twitter coffee date – users are encouraged to meet online at central time on the third Friday of the month to share tips, insights and stories virtually. We’ll use the hashtag #AskSWE in all of our tweets during this time to make it easier to hold a conversation. During this hour-long conversation, @SWETalk will ask a series of questions. Our featured guest will answer these questions alongside Twitter users from their Twitter account.

You can retweet the questions if you’d like. From there, just interact with others based on their answers as you would if you were meeting colleagues for lunch.

What will we discuss during #AskSWE?
Each month, we’ll tackle a new topic with our Twitter followers. Watch All Together and follow @SWETalk on Twitter to get the inside scoop on the next topic. Bring your questions and insights!

How do I participate in #AskSWE?
There are several ways to join this community. If you use third-party clients such HootSuite, TweetDeck or Seesmic, create a #AskSWE column. Using regular Twitter, create an #AskSWE saved search. You could also use an aggregating site like TwitterFall to see all the #AskSWE messages as they occur. Feel free to answer questions and ask your own.

When is #AskSWE?
At noon central time the third Friday of every month. The conversation lasts one hour.

I still have questions, who do I contact?
Tweet your questions to @SWETalk or e-mail socialmedia@swe.org.

Alyse Stofer, President

Alyse Stofer leader imageOver the course of her 19 years of membership, Alyse Stofer has been active at all levels of the Society. She served as director of regions in fiscal years 2009 and 2010; as director of membership initiatives in fiscal year 2011; and as president-elect in fiscal year 2012. In addition, she served as the Region H governor, lieutenant governor, and secretary, as well as in a variety of positions for the Minnesota Section, including section president, vice president, secretary, and representative. 

In 2003, Stofer was SWE's New Face of Engineering and featured in USA Today. In 2006, she received the SWE Distinguished New Engineer Award and was also the recipient of the MFESTS (Minnesota Federation of Engineering, Science, and Technology Societies) Young Engineer of the Year Award. In 2010, Stofer received the Region H Distinguished Service Award, and in 2011, SWE's Emerging Leader Award in Product Research, Design, and Engineering. 

Stofer is an engineering program manager at Medtronic, a global leader in medical technology devices. She is leading product development projects in the neuromodulation business sector, from concept to global commercialization. During her three years at Medtronic, she has launched two new products to assist with alleviating chronic back and leg pain. Prior to Medtronic, Stofer was employed at Transoma Medical for 11 years where she was a program manager leading the continuation engineering and product improvement engineering teams for the Patient Management Device division. For much of her career, Stofer contributed to and led technical design teams and, as a result, is a co-inventor on a patent as well as on several pending patents. 

She received her bachelor's degree in biomedical engineering from the University of Iowa, a master's degree in biomaterials from the University of Minnesota, and a medical device certificate from the University of St. Thomas. She and her husband, Kevin, a high school math teacher and coach, have a son and daughter. Stofer enjoys spending time outside with her children, as well as reading and baking. Much of her free time is spent cheering her children on at their baseball, soccer, or hockey games.

Liaisons

  • Audit Committee
  • Board of Trustees
  • Ethics Committee
  • Nominating Committee
  • Tellers Committee

president@swe.org

SWE Perspectives on E4C

E4C appealed to me because it’s an extension of my existing interests. It takes engineering to the people in a new direction that employs simple, frugal solutions that attack issues facing the developing world. It’s also a great approach that will work domestically to improve communities in need. I am focusing on projects that will give SWE members from collegiates to retirees the opportunity to get involved both nationally and locally.

For those considering joining E4C, I would recommend looking at the projects and thinking about how you can apply your expertise to contribute. Keep an eye out for a project that will appeal to you and your interests.

More than 230 SWE members actively participate in Engineering for Change, an initiative that allows our members to apply their unique skills and expertise to assist underserved populations around the world. SWE is proud to serve as a leadership sponsor for E4C and the number of our members making a difference with this organization has increased by 76 percent since the partnership was forged in 2011.

Give back. Change the world. Build your resume. Learn more about how SWE members are improving lives one project at a time, access the complimentary interactive E4C Webinar Series, or join E4C now and start making a difference today.

Need more information?  Contact Lester McNair at SWE HQ with your questions and feedback.  

 

 

Attend WE13 on Us!

yousucceed banner 566x235

Be eligible to win a complimentary conference regestration when you join SWE.*

Whether you’re at the beginning, middle or end of your career, career development matters. When you join The Society of Women Engineers (SWE), the largest resource of career development tools developed specifically for women in engineering, you make an investment in your career success.

Join Now to Enter

Go here to join. Enter WE13FREE in the coupon code field by midnight CST on June 7, 2013 and you'll be entered in our drawing for a complimentary professional registration for WE13.

WE13 will be held in Baltimore, Maryland from October 24-26. Events that require separate fees and travel costs are not included. You must enter WE13FREE in the coupon code field by midnight CST on June 7, 2013 to be eligible for this offer. Read the Official Contest Rules below for more information.




SWE Conference Registration Giveaway Official Contest Rules

NO PURCHASE IS NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN.   

Eligibility:  The drawing is open to all entrants who enter the drawing and who are at least 18 years of age.  Employees of Sponsor, their family members and direct vendors and distributors of Sponsor are prohibited from entering.  Entrants are subject to all applicable federal, state and local laws and regulations.  Void where prohibited by law.

Sponsor:  The drawing is sponsored by the Society of Women Engineers, 203 N La Salle Street, Suite 1675 Chicago, IL 60601 (“SWE” or “Sponsor”).

Agreement to Official Rules:  By participating in this drawing, entrants agree to abide by the terms and conditions thereof as established by Sponsor.  Sponsor reserves the right to qualify all submissions and to reject any submissions that do not meet the requirements for participation as established by Sponsor.

How to Enter:  

Contestants may either enter by joining SWE using code WE13FREE or sending your name, address and e-mail address to: SWE Conference Registration Giveaway, 203 N La Salle Street, Suite 1675 Chicago, IL 60601 by midnight CST June 7, 2013. All entries must provide the entrant’s name and e-mail address.

By entering, all entrants consent to the use by Sponsor of entrant’s name for marketing and/or sales promotional purposes without any attribution, identification, right of review or compensation.  Entries submitted without complete identifying information will not be eligible to win.  Limit one entry per person.

Sponsor assumes no responsibility for computer system, hardware, software or program malfunctions or other errors, failures, delayed computer transactions or network connections that are human or technical in nature, or for damaged, lost, late, illegible or misdirected entries; technical, hardware, software, electronic or telephone failures of any kind; lost or unavailable network connections; fraudulent, incomplete, garbled or delayed computer transmissions whether caused by Sponsor, the users, or by any of the equipment or programming associated with or utilized in this drawing; or by any technical or human error that may occur in the processing of submissions or downloading, that may limit, delay or prevent an entrant’s ability to participate in the drawing.

Sponsor reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to cancel or suspend this drawing and award a prize from entries received up to the time of termination or suspension should virus, bugs or other causes beyond Sponsor’s control, unauthorized human intervention, malfunction, computer problems, phone line or network hardware or software malfunction, which, in the sole opinion of Sponsor, corrupt, compromise or materially affect the administration, fairness, security or proper play of the drawing or proper submission of entries. Sponsor is not liable for any loss, injury or damage caused, whether directly or indirectly, in whole or in part, from downloading data or otherwise participating in this drawing.

Entry Period:  The entry period opens on May 15, 2013 and ends at midnight CST June 7, 2013.  Entries received before or after the entry period are void.

Selection of Winner:  The Prize Winner will be selected by a random drawing on or about July 1, 2013.  The odds of winning depend on the number of entries received.

Notification of Potential Prize Winner:  The Prize Winner will be notified by electronic mail on or before July 15, 2013.  If the Prize Winner does not acknowledge acceptance of the Prize within fifteen (15) days after being notified that he or she is the Prize Winner, another Prize Winner will be chosen using the same procedure specified above.

Requirements of Prize Winner:  The Prize Winner will be required to sign and return an affidavit of eligibility and liability and publicity release, wherever lawful, as a precondition to award of the Prize.  If the Prize Winner fails to sign and return the requested documents to Sponsor, that Prize Winner may be disqualified, and the Prize will thereafter be awarded to an alternate, randomly-selected Prize Winner from the remaining valid entries using the procedure specified above.

Prizes:  One Prize Winner will receive the following:

  1. Complimentary registration for one (1) to WE13, SWE’s annual conference, in Baltimore, Md., from Oct. 24-26, 2013, the details of which can be accessed online at: we13.org.
  2. All other expenses not specified above including, but not limited to, airfare, ground transportation, accommodations, all meals, beverages, gratuities, incidentals, baggage handling fees, taxes, airport transportation and other transportation are the sole responsibility of the Prize Winner.  Approximate Retail Value (“ARV”) of the prize is $535 USD. Prize Winner shall reasonably cooperate with Sponsor to arrange for registration. It shall be the responsibility of the Prize Winner to register for WE13 using the supplied code for admission. Any additional fees or penalties incurred as a consequence of any changes made to any travel arrangements after they are booked that are made at the request of Prize Winner are the sole responsibility of Prize Winner.  Prize Winner is responsible for securing all necessary travel documentation, including any passport or visa, as necessary.
  3. Prize Winner may not request prize substitution or cash redemption.  Prize is not transferable.  Taxes are the sole responsibility of the Prize Winner.  Sponsor reserves the right to substitute a Prize, or variations of any part of any Prize, of approximately equivalent value in its sole discretion.  Sponsor makes no warranties or disclaimers concerning the Prize.

In the event that Prize Winner chooses to decline any part of the Prize with Sponsor’s consent, said portion of the Prize will be deemed void and no substitution (monetary or otherwise) will be given.  If Prize Winner is unavailable to travel during any of the time periods specified above, the Prize will thereafter be awarded to an alternate, randomly-selected Prize Winner from the remaining valid entries using the procedure specified above.

RELEASE AND PUBLICITY:  ENTRANTS AGREE TO RELEASE AND HOLD HARMLESS SPONSOR AND ITS OFFICERS, DIRECTORS, EMPLOYEES, PARTNERS, AFFILIATED COMPANIES, SUBSIDIARIES, SUPPLIERS, DISTRIBUTORS, ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONAL AGENCIES, AGENTS, SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS FROM AND AGAINST ANY CLAIM OR CAUSE OF ACTION ARISING OUT OF PARTICIPATION IN THE DRAWING.  ENTRANTS AGREE THAT SPONSOR IS NOT LIABLE FOR INJURIES, LOSSES OR DAMAGES OF ANY KIND ARISING FROM PARTICIPATION IN THIS DRAWING AND ACCEPTANCE, POSSESSION AND USE OF ANY PRIZE.  SPONSOR IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY TYPOGRAPHICAL OR OTHER ERROR IN THE PRINTING OF THE OFFER OR ADMINISTRATION OF THE DRAWING OR IN THE ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE PRIZEs.  By receipt of the Prize, the Prize Winner consents to the use of his or her name and business name by Sponsor for advertising and promotional purposes, without any additional compensation, except where prohibited.  No entries will be returned.  All entries become the property of Sponsor.

DISPUTES:  EACH ENTRANT AGREES THAT: (1) ANY AND ALL DISPUTES, CLAIMS, AND CAUSES OF ACTION ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THIS DRAWING, OR ANY PRIZES AWARDED, SHALL BE RESOLVED INDIVIDUALLY, WITHOUT RESORTING TO ANY FORM OF CLASS ACTION, PURSUANT TO ARBITRATION CONDUCTED UNDER THE COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION RULES OF THE AMERICAN ARBITRATION ASSOCIATION, TO TAKE PLACE IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS; (2) ANY AND ALL CLAIMS, JUDGMENTS AND AWARDS SHALL BE LIMITED TO ACTUAL OUT-OF-POCKET COSTS INCURRED, INCLUDING COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH ENTERING THIS DRAWING, BUT IN NO EVENT ATTORNEYS’ FEES; AND (3) UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES WILL ENTRANT BE PERMITTED TO OBTAIN AWARDS FOR, AND ENTRANT HEREBY WAIVES ALL RIGHTS TO CLAIM, PUNITIVE, INCIDENTAL, AND CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, AND ANY OTHER DAMAGES, OTHER THAN FOR ACTUAL OUT-OF-POCKET EXPENSES, AND ANY AND ALL RIGHTS TO HAVE DAMAGES MULTIPLIED OR OTHERWISE INCREASED.  ALL ISSUES AND QUESTIONS CONCERNING THE CONSTRUCTION, VALIDITY, INTERPRETATION AND ENFORCEABILITY OF THESE OFFICIAL RULES, OR THE RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS OF ENTRANT AND SPONSOR IN CONNECTION WITH THE DRAWING, SHALL BE GOVERNED BY AND CONSTRUED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, WITHOUT GIVING EFFECT TO ANY CHOICE OF LAW OR CONFLICT OF LAW RULES OR PROVISIONS (WHETHER OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS OR ANY OTHER JURISDICTION) THAT WOULD CAUSE THE APPLICATION OF THE LAWS OF ANY JURISDICTION OTHER THAN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS.

Drawing Results and Official Rules:  To obtain the identity of the Prize Winner and/or a copy of these Official Rules, send an email to hq@swe.org -or- send a self-addressed stamped envelope to the Society of Women Engineers, 203 N La Salle Street, Suite 1675 Chicago, IL 60601.

Request an Account and Select a Template

Please complete the form below so that SWE HQ can create a Weebly account for your Region or Section. Note: this form should be completed with the Region or Section's web master information. We can create only one account per website. Allow 72 hours for a response. You may direct any questions to SWE Support

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Coupon Code Descriptions for SWE FY15 Membership Products

If one of the following categories apply to you, use the Coupon Code listed for a discount on membership dues. These discounts apply to basic Professional ($100) and Collegiate ($20) grades of membership and are available only at time of joining or renewal. Enter the appropriate code at the bottom of the membership product order page.

The discounted price will be reflected on the payment page. Membership is from purchase date through June 30, 2015. Only one discount per membership product applies. An application fee is included for new members.

Contact membership@swe.org with any questions.

EARLY BIRD – Professional members renewing their dues online prior to June 30 are eligible for a $5.00 discount off of their membership.
Coupon Code: BIRD

INTERNATIONAL (Professional or Collegiate) – SWE offers reduced dues* to individuals residing in either Low Income Economies (66% savings) or Low Middle Income Economies (33% savings) based on the World Bank List of Economies (July 2013). Locate the list of countries on the SWE Website below the Member Types tab. *Full dues-paying members receive copy of SWE Magazine; all others receive electronic version.
Coupon Codes: International LE (Low Income Economies)
                         International LME (Low Middle Income Economies)

JOINT Memberships (Professional or Collegiate) – Joint membership with the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), or the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) is only available via online processing. The discount for a joint membership with SWE and one of the other organizations is less than joining each one separately. These rates are only available from April 1 – December 31.
Coupon Codes: AISES PROF, NSBE PROF or SHPE PROF (for Professional Members)
                         AISES COLL, NSBE COLL or SHPE COLL (for Collegiate Members)

K-12 EDUCATOR (Renewing members) - Full-time educators teaching grades K-12, receive a reduced membership rate of $20. New K-12 Educator members should contact membership@swe.org to process a new membership.
Coupon Code: K-12

RECENT GRADUATES – Individuals with graduation dates within 24-months, but not current Collegiate members, receive 50% discount. (Current Collegiate members transitioning to Professional membership should use the membership product listed for a more significant discount.)
Coupon Code: GRAD

PROFESSIONAL BACK to SCHOOL – Professional members returning to school full-time receive a reduced dues rate of $20.
Coupon Code: B2S

RETIRED – Individuals completely retired from paid employment are eligible for a 50% discount.
Coupon Code: RET

UNEMPLOYED – Individuals not currently employed, but not retired, are eligible for a 50% discount.
Coupon Code: UNEM

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hello Blog entries posted in Professional Development Blog entries posted in Professional Development http://alltogether.swe.org Tue, 22 Jul 2014 20:28:11 +0100 FeedCreator 1.7.3 SWE Advance Webinars http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/swe-advance-webinars-1109.html <p><img src="http://alltogether.swe.org/images/stories/Dec13/swe_advance_522x142_upcoming (1).jpg" border="0" alt="Webinars" title="Webinars" width="522" height="142" /><br /><br /></p><br/><p>What’s Different about Big Data?<br /> July 16, 2014<br /> Sponsored by: General Dynamics</p><br/><p>Big data is the latest buzzword in a long history of business technology panaceas. What’s the real value in big data? This presentation by Sue Feldman, CEO of Synthexis and longtime IDC analyst, discusses the sub... Josh Agusti 0 Tue, 08 Jul 2014 01:18:18 +0100 SWE Advance Webinars http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/swe-advance-webinars-1101.html <p><img src="http://alltogether.swe.org/images/stories/Dec13/swe_advance_522x142_upcoming (1).jpg" border="0" alt="Webinars" title="Webinars" width="522" height="142" /><br /><br /></p><br/><p>A Deeper Dive: Returning to Engineering after a Career Break<br />June 19, 2014<br />Sponsored by: Boston Scientific</p><br/><p>This webinar is a follow-up to my September 2013 SWE webinar on Strategies and Advice for Returning to Work in Engineering. We didn't have time to go into detail on all of the strategie... Josh Agusti 0 Thu, 12 Jun 2014 21:50:56 +0100 SWE Advance Webinars http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/swe-advance-webinars.html <p><img src="http://alltogether.swe.org/images/stories/Dec13/swe_advance_522x142_upcoming (1).jpg" border="0" alt="Webinars" title="Webinars" width="522" height="142" /><br /><br /></p><br/><p>Seven Steps to a Stellar LinkedIn Profile<br />May 7, 2014<br />Sponsored by: Turner Construction </p><br/><p>Whether you’re actively look for a new job or want to learn how the best in the business use LinkedIn, this webinar is for you. Kelly Janowski, the Society of Women Engineers’ social media and public r... Josh Agusti 0 Tue, 06 May 2014 07:11:59 +0100 WIA Webinars http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/wia-webinars-1059.html <p>The Women In Academia (WIA) Committee is planning to hold two more webinars this fiscal year. These webinars will be geared toward SWE members who are currently in a tenure-track academic position and graduate students who are interested in going into tenure-track academic positions.</p><br/><p>Our next Women in Academia webinar is scheduled for Friday, May 9 at 1pm CST. Toni Doolen of Oregon State University and Alice Pawley of Purdue University will be speaking about the teaching and serv... Josh Agusti 0 Tue, 06 May 2014 07:08:28 +0100 Women In Academia Webinars http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/wia-webinars-1004.html <p>The Women In Academia (WIA) Committee is planning to hold two more webinars in the upcoming months.The webinars will be geared toward SWE members currently in a tenure-track academic position and graduate students interested in going into a tenure-track academic position.</p><br/><p>Upcoming WIA Webinars to look forward to:<br /> <br /> • Writing Your Tenure Package: Teaching, Service - April 2014<br /> • Writing Your Tenure Package: Research - May/June 2014<br /> <br /> Join the LinkedIn g... Josh Agusti 0 Tue, 11 Mar 2014 20:56:03 +0100 Engineering For Change - February Webinar http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/engineering-for-change-february-webinar.html <p align="center">E4C Webinar | Emerging Trends in Social Entrepreneurship - Social Enterprises: Scaling Impact</p><br/><p align="center">Presented by:<br /> Pamela Roussos, Director of Strategic Alliances, Center for Science, Technology, and Society, Santa Clara University<br /> <br /> February 26, 2014 | 11:00 AM EST</p><br/><p>Social entrepreneurship fuses together the world of business acumen and the world of solving social problems. Mission-oriented organizations set out to tackle... Josh Agusti 0 Thu, 13 Feb 2014 07:38:19 +0100 Women in Academia Webinars http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/women-in-academia-webinars.html <p>The Women In Academia (WIA) Committee will be hosting three webinars in the upcoming months. These will be geared toward SWE members currently in a tenure-track academic position and graduate students interested in going into a tenure-track academic position.</p><br/><p>The first webinar, "How to Establish a Successful Research Program at Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions," will be hosted on Tuesday, Feb. 4 from 10-11 a.m. PST. Login details will be posted on the SWE Women In Academ... Josh Agusti 0 Tue, 11 Feb 2014 22:23:22 +0100 Take Charge of Your Career Development http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/take-charge-of-your-career-development.html <p>It’s time to be the driver of your career, not a passenger. As part of the Society’s commitment to giving you the tools you need to succeed, we’re proud to introduce the Online Career Development Conference. On March 13 and 14, enjoy a series of seminars aimed at diversifying your skills and preparing you for the next step in your career, all from the comfort of your home or office. Designed for women three to 15 years into their careers, these sessions are specifically designed to hel... Josh Agusti 0 Tue, 11 Feb 2014 21:22:49 +0100 Women in Academia Webinars http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/wia-webinars.html <p>The Women In Academia (WIA) Committee will host three webinars in the upcoming months geared toward SWE members currently in a tenure-track academic position and graduate students interested in going into a tenure-track academic position. The first one will be a re-offering of the popular WE13 session: How to Establish a Successful Research Program at Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions. The next two will be a series focusing on writing and putting together a tenure package includ... Josh Agusti 1 Tue, 07 Jan 2014 22:30:44 +0100 Featured Webinars http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/featured-webinars.html <p><img src="http://alltogether.swe.org/images/stories/Dec13/swe_advance_522x142_upcoming (1).jpg" border="0" alt="Webinars" title="Webinars" width="522" height="142" /><br /><br /></p><br/><p>Jan. 15 - Field of Cyber Security Research and Development and Opportunities for Women</p><br/><p>Cybersecurity is a constant challenge facing many aspects of our society. Society seemingly has an insatiable thirst for more and more cyber capabilities that is accelerating at an increasingly rapid pace. We eag... Josh Agusti 0 Tue, 07 Jan 2014 06:00:00 +0100 SWE's FIRST Online Professional Development Forum http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/swes-first-online-professional-development-forum.html <p style="text-align: center;">“Take Charge of Your Career Development”</p><br/><p> </p><br/><p style="text-align: left;">Thursday, March 13 and Friday, March 14<br /> <br /> SWE’s first two-day online forum will be geared toward early- and mid-career women with approximately five to eight years experience in the workplace. Career development is an ongoing, lifelong process where we learn new skills to better ourselves in our personal and professional lives. This online forum will cover a multitud... Josh Agusti 5 Thu, 12 Dec 2013 01:26:27 +0100 Free Webinar: Engineering for the Developing World http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/free-webinar-engineering-for-the-developing-world.html <p>2 p.m. EST Nov. 21, 2013<br /> <br /> Designing and distributing successful, appropriate technologies for the developing world presents great challenges for engineers. Answering that call, two of the premier experts in the field of engineering for the developing world identify these challenges and discuss their successful solutions.<br /> <br /> CLICK HERE TO REGISTER NOW for this Live Event!</p><br/><p><img src="http://alltogether.swe.org/images/stories/Nov13/Johnson.png" border=... Josh Agusti 0 Mon, 11 Nov 2013 06:00:00 +0100 Access Recordings of SWE Finance Training for FY14 Section, Region and MAL Officers http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/swe-section-and-region-officers-finance-training.html <p>Are you a section, region or MAL officer and interested in learning more about finances at the section and region level? The finance committee recently recorded two webinars:</p><br/><p>SWE Finance Training for FY14 Section, Region, and MAL Officers<br /> SWE, Your EIN, and the IRS</p><br/><p>These webinars help prepare collegiate and professional treasurers and presidents/governors with the tools they'll need for a successful year. The first webinar covers the latest version of the finance manual ... Josh Agusti 0 Tue, 08 Oct 2013 20:46:11 +0100 SWE Finance Training for Officers at Section and Region Levels http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/swe-finance-training-for-incoming-fy14-officers-at-section-and-region-levels.html <p>A webinar will be offered for incoming FY14 section and region officers at 4 pm Central time on Wednesday, Sept. 18. This training will help prepare collegiate and professional treasurers and presidents/governors with the tools they need for a successful year. The latest version of the Finance Manual will be reviewed and questions from participants will be answered.</p><br/><p>Register now.</p> Josh Agusti 0 Tue, 10 Sep 2013 05:00:00 +0100 Directing Innovation for Women in Science, Technology and Engineering: Preferred Customer Discount http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/directing-innovation-for-women-in-science-technology-and-engineering-preferred-customer-discount.html <p>Directing Innovation, our program in partnership with Smith College Executive Education, is designed to transform accomplished businesswomen in ST&amp;E into outstanding global strategists and innovators who can contribute more broadly to their organizations’ ongoing success. A select group of top faculty members, industry experts and thought leaders facilitate interactive sessions on critical topics and the issues that face today’s global business leaders. Smith’s signature all-female learni... Josh Agusti 0 Wed, 07 Aug 2013 22:01:22 +0100 Register for Moving up the Ladder - Parts 3 and 4 http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/register-for-moving-up-the-ladder-skills-for-mid-level-managers-series.html <p>This webinar series is generously sponsored by Abbott<br />Click here to register.</p><br/><p>Part 3: Diversity: Creating a Culture of Opportunity<br />August 22, 5:00 PM Eastern </p><br/><p>Part 4: Setting Your Vision: The Pathway to Effective Leadership<br />September 13, 5:00 PM Eastern </p><br/><p>One of the most important jobs of any manager is to oversee effective execution of a company’s strategic priorities. High performance project management requires strong proficiency and competency to alig... Administrator 0 Tue, 07 Aug 2012 12:14:48 +0100 Midsummer Midcareer Refresher Webinar Series Part Four: Introduction to Salary Negotiation ... http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/midsummer-midcareer-refresher-webinar-series-part-four-introduction-to-salary-negotiation-strategy-and-tactics.html <p>July 19, 2012, 5:00 pm EST<br />This webinar is generously sponsored by Kellogg’s<br />Click here to register.</p><br/><p>Did you know that the salary of your very first job after graduation determines your salaries for the rest of your life? Learn how to create a win-win situation and negotiate right from start to finish in the job decision process. Clarifying your needs and wants, and those of the other party are key. The negotiation skills you learn are valuable in that they can be applied to... Administrator 0 Tue, 10 Jul 2012 08:05:39 +0100 New Webinar Series: Midsummer Midcareer Refresher http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/new-webinar-series-midsummer-midcareer-refresher.html <p>Part One: Branding and Career Advancement<br />June 21, 2012, 5:00 pm EST<br />This webinar is generously sponsored by HP<br />Click here to register.</p><br/><p>A brand is simply a promise of value, and it is the most important promise you will ever make (and continue to make) in your career and business. We will discuss the elements of a brand and branding, how to define your brand and how to articulate your brand to different constituents. We will also crystallize the connection between brand... Administrator 1 Tue, 12 Jun 2012 12:32:49 +0100 Listen to Replays of the "From Good to Great" Webinar Series http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/listen-to-replays-of-the-from-good-to-great-webinar-series.html <p>Click here to listen to replays of this webinar series<br /><br />About the Series:</p><br/><p>Great negotiation flows not only from a collaborative mindset and language, but also from a specific method of creative thinking. This subtle but very important understanding is what separates a good negotiation from a great one: a negotiation that achieves results that exceed the expectations of every party to the negotiation. In this two-part webinar, Elaine Rosenblum will present a couple of differe... Nikki Caiafa 0 Wed, 09 May 2012 07:11:18 +0100 Register for the Three-Part Webinar Series "Collaborative Competition™" http://alltogether.swe.org/blog/register-for-the-three-part-webinar-series-collaborative-competitiona--425.html <p>Part 1: A Woman’s Guide to Succeeding by Competing<br />May 10, 2012; 5:00 pm EST<br />Register for this webinar</p><br/><p>This webinar provides an overview of the key concepts from the book with a focus on the proprietary leadership model, Collaborative Competition™, a skill set that leverages women’s strengths as collaborators. The book uses tennis as a metaphor for learning how to use competition to your advantage in the workplace and demonstrates how and why to avoid falling into the trap o... Nikki Caiafa 0 Wed, 09 May 2012 07:10:12 +0100

Public Policy Washington Spotlight

Each month Melissa Carl, SWE Washington Representative, spotlights SWE’s public policy initiatives as related to Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education, as well as the application of Title IX to STEM fields. This month’s spotlight includes:

  • SWE Testifies on Capitol Hill About Girls and STEM
  • NASA Releases Report on Title IX and STEM
  • OMB/OSTP Release S&T Priorities for FY11 Budget
  • House Approves Bill to Support Small High-Tech Entrepreneurs

Escalate Your Diversity Goals Year-round with SWE!

Retain, Develop, Recruit

The Society of Women Engineers (SWE) is more than 25,000 members strong, representing a vast pool of female engineers and technologists in all disciplines and experience levels. SWE also provides training, resources and recognition to help with your company's development and retention goals.

Explore SWE for Free! As an attendee of the 2013 Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) Conference & Exposition, June 16–19 in Chicago, make sure to register for one of SWE's show offers here.

  • Exclusive access to SWE online resources, including dozens of webinars with topics ranging from retention to career longevity and diversity!

OR

  • Receive a 30-day free job posting in the SWE Online Career Center, and get in front of thousands of women engineers, representing all career levels and disciplines.

Note: Offers expire June 25, 2013.

Partner with the Society of Women Engineers to fulfill your organization's objectives and to access the resources, below. For more information, visit SWE Booth #1639 at SHRM.

WE13 Annual Conference

we13 shrm Annual-Conference banner
SWE's Annual Conference puts your company face-to-face with driven candidates and provides your employees with opportunities to network, learn and grow. The WE12 conference is November 8-10 in Houston; booth space and sponsorships are still available. Contact conferencemanager@swe.org.

Career Center

Career Center web
SWE's targeted online Career Center connects your organization with qualified candidates from around the world, including experienced professionals and recent grads, eager to join your organization and take it to the next level. Contact careers@swe.org.

SWE Magazine

SWE Mag Cover
The award-winning SWE Magazine puts you in front of more than 20,000 SWE members, four times per year, in print and online. Coverage includes accomplishments of technical women; career development and guidance; women's issues in the workplace; and technical themes. For more information, email adv@swe.org.

SWE Corporate Membership

Corporate Membership web-2013
Learn more about the benefits of membership and why companies, including many Fortune 500 organizations, are part of this program. Join today! Contact funddevelopment@swe.org.

SWE Advance

Career Development
"SWE Advance: Learning for Career & Life" provides specific Professional Development Programs to expand your employees' skill-sets through webinars, online courses, podcasts and more. Contact learning@swe.org.

Melissa Tata, President

Melissa Tata served as the SWE FY12 President.

Melissa Tata is a 12-year Dell veteran and currently serves as the director of engineering and supply chain program management. In this role, she is responsible for streamlining demand and supply planning functions end-to-end, integrating key acquisitions and facilitating change management and sustainable processes to instill a better customer awareness in programs and designs. Melissa is also driving business case development, establishing program governance, and creating a staff development plan to enhance expertise and retention in Dell’s engineering operations team.

Prior to this role, Melissa was the executive assistant to the president of Consumer, Small & Medium business unit at Dell. She was responsible for defining strategy implementation plans, establishing sustainable business management systems and governance processes, leading communication of priorities across the organization, and driving executive alignment and best of breed sharing. 

During her six years of management experience, Melissa led teams from eight to 82 and was recognized for generating creative solutions, motivating others, establishing new processes and leading Six Sigma Green and Black Belt projects totaling over $30M in annual savings.  Melissa has had the honor of participating in three intense leadership and diversity training programs through Dell, SWE and the Texas Women’s Leadership Power Pipeline. In the various senior manager roles Melissa held in marketing operations, she was responsible for almost $1B in revenue.   Melissa developed partner alliance agreements, grew business volume, enhanced forecasting and augmented profitability.  In her manufacturing operations senior manager roles, Melissa launched controls for inventory management across 10 facilities, initiated an engineering development program, supported global best practice sharing, and led the installation of all equipment and labor standards for all the headcount to support a factory with product volumes of over 25k/day.

As a SWE life member and 16-year veteran, Melissa appreciates that SWE has enabled her to demonstrate passion, leadership, integrity, and teamwork to drive member engagement.  Melissa served four years on the SWE Board of Directors as director of External Initiatives and as speaker of the Council of Representatives. Before that she served as Gulf Coast Region (C) Governor and Deputy Director.  She served  as the  president  for the Southwest Texas section for two terms in addition to serving as vice president.  As a collegiate, Melissa served as president of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Section and as Region F Newsletter Editor.  She is the recipient of the SWE 2005 Distinguished New Engineer Award.

Melissa studied mechanical engineering with a M.S. from MIT and B.S. from RPI. Melissa enjoys dancing, swimming and reading. She also treasures time with her daughter and recently relocated from Dell’s headquarters in Texas to Massachusetts.

Home

 

 

 

Start Planning Your 2011 SWE Resolutions

Start Planning Your 2011 SWE Resolutions

The final days of 2010 are right around the corner. Take some time to reflect on all that you and your section have achieved this past year and start making your positive SWE resolutions for the upcoming year. These could include recruiting new members to join SWE, planning an outreach event or activity, signing up for professional development opportunities or exploring the online Career Center —anything that will help you achieve personal and professional goals within the Society.

Exhibit at the WE12 Conference, November 8-10, 2012 in Houston

Reach thousands of talented and energetic women engineers and technologists by exhibiting at the WE12 Career Fair. Visit the WE12 site to learn about the different exhibit packages available and to register!

Sponsorships Are Also Available

SWE has many WE12 sponsorship opportunities available, allowing you to build relationships with potential recruits, as well as show your commitment to a vital engineering industry. 

With your sponsorship, you will be acknowledged in the following promotional materials:

  • Conference publications
  • Conference website (swe.org/we12)
  • On-site in the registration area

Click here to view the different sponsorship opportunities available.

Enhance Your Talent Search with Insights from an Expert

Peter Weddle, a recruiter, HR consultant and business CEO, offers insight into leveraging the Career Center and creating a strong presence in his columns, What 11-23-63 Can Teach Recruiters, Become a Talent Whisperer and Maximizing Your ROR – Your Return on Recruiting.

What 11-23-63 Can Teach Recruiters offers tips on how you can provide applicants with an engaging and respectful experience.

Become a Talent Whisperer shows how you can quickly and effectively connect with talent.

Maximizing Your ROR – Your Return on Recruiting explores the most effective recruiting techniques based on his annual Source of Employment (SOE) survey.

Greetings Collegians!

This Issue is Sponsored By:

ExxonMobil

Math, science and engineering are the foundations on which technological breakthroughs are built. These principles are fundamental to all innovation at ExxonMobil. They inform everything we do to produce and deliver the energy the world needs to grow and prosper. At ExxonMobil, more than 14,000 scientists and engineers share our commitment to technological innovation as a means to facilitate human progress and meet the key challenges ahead.

Summer is winding down, but SWE is ramping back up in a major way. Notable happenings include the SWE Senate, formerly the COR, passing the first very important motion of the year, the Collegiate Leadership Forum (CLF), and of course all of your local section’s welcome-back activities.

Recently the Senate passed a motion authorizing the transfer of funds from the contingency reserve fund into the operating budget. As a result, SWE will not have to downsize programs, staff, and other resources (including promotion of the SWE Career Center). Each region has one collegiate senator; I encourage you to discuss with her your thoughts and opinions on such motions.

During my short time with SWE, my leadership skills have grown tremendously. I was an original SWE Future Leader (SWEFL) at the first CLF. This year’s Forum coincided with Board Induction in Chicago on July 31 and August 1. SWEFLs are rising sophomore and juniors who are selected by a panel each spring. The Regional Collegiate Representatives (RCRs) and Senators also attend this amazing training weekend. This year I encourage you to think about developing your own leadership skills by applying for these positions.

As you get back into the swing of things, you may find your section needs some assistance. SWE Collegiate Leadership Coaches can provide specific modules to help with everything from burnout to fundraising ideas. I also encourage you to work with your Section Counselor to develop a tactical plan. I hope this advice will help get your year off to a great start!

Please feel free to email me with any questions or comments.

Have a SWEet Day!

 

Martha Addison
FY10 Collegiate Board Representative
bodcollegiaterep@swe.org

09/14/2009: Values-Based Leadership: Leading with R.E.S.P.E.C.T. Part 1

Values-Based Leadership: Leading with R.E.S.P.E.C.T. Part 1

Monday, September 14, 2009 (54 minutes)
Presented by Jim Hornickel

This webinar series is designed to help leaders at all levels remove old personal barriers and uncover and develop previously hidden strengths. Using the principles of R.E.S.P.E.C.T. that are at the essence of values-based leadership, participants will discover how becoming more proficient at Responsiveness, Empathy, Service, Perspectives, Self Esteem, Courage and Truth-telling will transform the way they lead, the relationships they create and the results they produce.

Part 1 discusses:

Responsiveness: With the first segment devoted to responsiveness, there will be discussion about the negative or positive impact on staff of being either non-responsive or responsive managers. We go through a “Values Clarification” process; understanding what motivates people and how responding situationally to each team member’s known values produces the results you want.

Empathy: During the 2nd segment of the webinar we will focus on empathy. We will discuss how relating to other’s situations powerfully transforms relationship building. We run through a short introduction of the four behavioral styles with regard to empathetic exchanges. 

Download: Presentation Slides | Values Clarification

 

Greetings!

This Issue is Sponsored By:

medtronic Live Your Mission: Now seeking mechanical, manufacturing and quality engineers in Memphis, Tennessee.

We provide life-long solutions for people with chronic diseases guided firmly by our mission to alleviate pain, restore health and extend life. Today, every five seconds the life of someone in the world is improved by a Medtronic product or therapy. As a global company, we need many perspectives from a diverse employee base to ensure our life-changing products and therapies benefit all people. At Medtronic, diversity and inclusion are core values.

For additional information, please visit medtronic.com/careers and select Memphis, TN under location to apply today.

In April, I had a chance to participate in and emcee the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Grand Challenges of the 21st Century – Chicago Summit 2010. The NAE Grand Challenges are a grouping of critical problems that must be addressed and solved in order to maintain the United States’ national security, quality of life and sustainable future. They are a call to action and will engage the public to understand the importance of technology, policy and science to maintain and enhance our standard of living. The Chicago 2010 Summit was designed to stimulate the engineering, science and policy advances needed to solve the following four Grand Challenges:

  • Clean Water
  • Carbon, Energy and Climate
  • Urban Sustainability
  • Global Health

A consistent message I heard at the Summit was that we need more engineers and innovations to solve these Grand Challenges, which are complex, broad and intertwined. This means we need to build the next generation of engineers quickly while increasing the quantity, and better utilize all human and intellectual capital. Diversity and inclusion fuel innovation. I believe we are in an era that provides many opportunities for engineers to make an impact and a world of difference. As women engineers, we should make sure we lead these opportunities.

I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate those collegiate members who are graduating this summer. Although it was likely not an easy effort, you have achieved a major milestone in your life and should be very proud of your accomplishment! Please do not forget to transition your membership to Recent Graduate and get connected with members in the local professional section. If you have found a job, I congratulate you and welcome you to the engineering workforce in solving those Grand Challenges!  If you are still looking, please don’t forget to utilize SWE’s Career Center and network to help you secure a dream job! 

Best wishes to you all!

Nora Lin

 

Nora Lin
FY10 SWE President
president@swe.org

 

     

       

       

       

       

       

      How are Members Assigned to Sections?

      In general, members are assigned as follows: (1) a collegiate member enrolled at an institution with a collegiate section is assigned to it; if the institution does not have a collegiate section, the collegiate member is assigned to a professional section or the Member-at-Large (MAL) based upon the member’s preferred mailing address; (2) a professional member is assigned to either a professional section or the MAL based upon the member’s preferred mailing address.

      Find Your Dream Job with the Career Center

      Whether you’ve recently graduated college and are entering the workforce or have 10 years of experience and want to change jobs, the Career Center will help you transition.  Below is a reminder of what the Career Center has to offer.

      • Free and confidential resume posting: Make your resume available to employers in the engineering industry, confidentially if you choose
      • Job search control: Quickly and easily find relevant industry job listings, and sign up for automatic email notification of new jobs that match your criteria
      • Easy job application: Apply online and create a password-protected account for managing your job search
      • Saved jobs capability: Save up to 100 jobs to a folder in your account, so you can easily apply whenever you are ready

      Visit the Career Center today to post your resume and search for jobs.

      The Habits of a Highly Effective Job Seeker

      Set Realistic Goals for Yourself
      As a highly qualified candidate competing for a shrinking number of jobs, how can you effectively deal with the intense competition without becoming discouraged? Begin by setting realistic expectations and goals.

      Write a Résume That Gets You in the Door
      Your résume is a tool with one specific purpose: to obtain an interview. To ensure your résume is effective, enlist a friend or colleague to review it. They may be able to point out potential deal breakers, as well as offer ideas to enhance your résume.

      Re-evaluate Your Approach
      Examine what you've been good at in the past, understand where you are today and set goals for tomorrow. Establish habits that will reposition you as a sincere candidate interested in building a career rather than simply landing a job.

      Pick Up the Habits of a Highly Effective Job Seeker

      • Be Specific: Make sure your résume and relevant skills match the opportunity
      • Be Honest: Stretching the truth is never a good idea and often times will be uncovered
      • Be Precise: Check and re-check your résume and cover letter
      • Be Polite: Make sure the employer can tell you are interested, qualified and available
      • Be Respectful: Sincerity and humility stand out in a sea of résumes
      • Be Responsive: Employers expect interested candidates to be prompt and punctual

      Begin today by updating your résume on the SWE Career Center!

      SWE Leadership Reports

      SWE provides rosters and reports to the leadership of regions, professional or collegiate sections, MALs and the Society. The reports available are:

      1. Active Member Roster

      2. Active Members' Status

      3. Added Member Roster

      4. Dropped Member Roster

      5. Member Change Report

      6. Leadership Rosters for Regions, Sections and MALs

      Accessing Leadership Reports

      Reports are at leadership.swe.org and require a login with the leader's SWE user name and password. Only leaders authorized to access membership rosters will be able to login.

      After login, the SWE Leadership Reports home-page lists each of the reports, a summary of what each report includes, and a reminder of “opt-out” requirements when using this data. Rosters include an "opt-out" indicator and Federal law requires SWE honor any individual's request to "opt-out" from correspondence.  SWE leaders must honor this "opt-out" and can only contact members for specific business, such as ballots and invoices. Be sure to remove "opt-out" members from any list for other uses.

      On the left hand side of the page are links to each of the rosters available. Click on the link to select a report.

      When a report is selected, the user is provided with drop-down selections for region(s) and section(s). The content of the drop-down is what the user is authorized to access.  Selection of data to return is a two-step process. First the region(s) is selected and the "OK" button is clicked. The second step is to select the section(s). Sections and regions are selected by clicking on the check-box before the name. If a section or region is not to be selected, click on the check-box a second time to de-select it.

      The reports that list added, dropped, and changed members provide the difference from the current roster and a previous roster. For those reports, the user can also select a "comparison date" that defines the date of the previous roster used.

      Once these selections are complete, click the “View Report” button.

      Currently the system has an additional level of security to access the data. Leaders have been provided the user name and password in the email message announcing the availability of the reports. Enter that information to continue. Note that this user name and password are different than the leader's personal user name and password pair.

       The report/roster is presented in the web browser. Navigation through the table in the browser is through the up/down and left/right scroll bars.  A toolbar above the headings of the roster provide the ability to move through browser-based report pages, and search for information in the returned data.

      That information can be downloaded to PDF, Excel or Word formats. An "export" pull-down menu is to the right of the search tool. 

      The report/roster can be run again with different parameters by changing the original selections and clicking on the "View Report" button.

      If you need assistance or have comments, please contact membership@swe.org or call 312-596-5223.

      Notes

      Rosters include an "opt-out" indicator. Any member may request to "opt-out" from correspondence from SWE and federal law requires that SWE, including all local leadership, honor any individual's request to "opt-out."

      Member contact information is the data provided by the member as her/his "preferred" information and that can only be changed by the member. If alternate contact information is required, look up the member in the detailed member directory. 

      Regions are abbreviated by the identifying letter. All members-at-large are abbreviated by "M".  All international members are abbreviated by "Z."

      It may take one to three business days for a new member to appear in the roster, depending on the completeness of the information in the membership application.

      If a leader changes her SWE user name, she will not be able to login for 24 hours until the change has propagated through the system.

      Updating Rosters

      All Professional Section, Collegiate Section and MAL Leadership must provide SWE with their current leadership. This information is stored in the membership record, plus it indicates who is eligible to access the leadership reports listed above. 

      Begin by selecting the type of roster you want to complete.  The type of roster will determine whether you need to select a Region/Section before proceeding.  After choosing the region/section, hit the “Load Previous” button.  This will either bring up any previous entered data, or allow you to begin entering new data.

      Enter either the permanent region/section/MAL address or the mailing address where rebates should be mailed for the fiscal year.  

      Enter the last names of the leaders in the appropriate fields. As you enter the name, a list of paid SWE region/section/MAL members will be displayed. Be sure to select the correct individual. If a member is not a current paid member of SWE, their name will not appear in the list.

      The start and end dates will auto-populate with the current fiscal year dates.  

      If don’t have all the information you need to complete the form, hit the “Save/Update” button. You will be able to log back into the system and complete the information at a later date.

      After completely entering all the data and hitting the “Save/Update” button, select the verification checkbox and enter your e-mail address as a signature. (Collegiate Sections require a Faculty Advisor or Counselor to confirm the information also.)  An e-mail verification will be sent to the e-mail address provided when the data is received. If you have roster changes during the year, you will have to contact headquarters at membership@swe.org to make these changes.

       

      SWE Groups

      The SWE Groups page will be available after March 1st, 2012

      Join SWE to Recruit, Retain and Develop Women Engineers in Your Organization

      Retain, Develop, Recruit - Register Today for a Free Webinar

      SWE helps organizations support their leadership training, achieve their recruitment and retention goals, and advance their women engineers and technologists. As a Corporate Member of SWE, you can fulfill your organization’s objectives and access these resources:

      Annual Conference:
      As a corporate member, you will receive three registrations to the Annual Conference, attracting more than 5,000 attendees and 250 exhibitors each fall. Through the numerous professional development sessions  and plenaries, the Career Fair and award receptions, your employees can network with like-minded professionals and grow their skill sets (CEU credits are available on many sessions and workshops). The Annual Conference  also brings you face-to-face with qualified professionals in the industry – at every stage in their careers.  The WE12 Conference will be held Nov. 8-11, 2012 in Houston.

      Career Center:
      Gain access to qualified and diverse engineers with a free 60-day online posting on SWE’s Career Center. By reaching this highly targeted group of women, you can showcase your company as a diversity advocate and gain qualified leads for engineering positions in your company.

      Professional Development:
      Support your women employees with a wealth of professional development resources, including webinars – free to corporate members – that cover topics such as Work/Life Balance, Management and Strategy, Career Development, and Innovation in Technology and Business.

      SWE Magazine:
      Receive a complimentary subscription to SWE Magazine, distributed four times per year online and in print. Coverage includes women’s issues in the workplace; technical achievements of women; and career development and guidance.

      Become a Corporate Member today and start achieving your organization’s recruitment, retention and advancement goals! Contact Jen Scott at Jennifer.scott@swe.org.

      Engineering Today

      • In 2008, engineers held about 1.6 million jobs. Overall engineering employment is expected to grow by 11 percent over the 2008–18 decade (to 1,750,300) according to the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics

      • 13.4 percent of engineering professionals are women (2011 Data Book, NACME)

      • Women engineers still face barriers in the workplace, including feeling isolated due to a lack of mentors and networks, as well as facing pressure to achieve balance with their work and family commitments

      Career Center

      The SWE Career Center page will be available after March 1st, 2012

      The "Strategic Crisis Management" Webinar Replay Now Available

      Strategic Crisis Management

      As a leader within an organization you are faced with crises that deeply impact your business. What strategies are successful for mitigating these crises? Leaders within organizations must be prepared to handle rapidly changing environments and anticipate potential threats. This requires a deep understanding of the strategic complexities in managing various stakeholders and constituencies. This webinar presents concrete strategies on how to successfully manage the inevitable complexities that come with managing a crisis situation.

      Learning Objectives:

      • Identify proven strategies to mitigate crises
      • Assess the complexities of a rapidly changing environment
      • Recognize the threats as well as the opportunities in a crisis situation

      This webinar was generously sponsored by Southern Company.

      Click here to listen to the replay.

      Career Center Updates Benefit Job Seekers

      Improvements to SWE’s Career Center now offer features that create a more enhanced job search experience. Job seekers can search for jobs by title only or exact phrase, which allows candidates to better target their Career Center search efforts.

      With these updates, job seekers can also easily manage their information and searches. The automated apply emails have been updated to encourage updating profiles, storing resumes and other documents, saving jobs, creating Job Agents and tracking applications. In addition, the new "Submit Job Application" page will drive candidates to update professional profiles, change search statuses or continue the job search.

      Leverage Your Career Recruiting Efforts with Insights from an Expert

      Peter Weddle, a recruiter, HR consultant and business CEO, offers insight into leveraging the Career Center and creating a strong presence in his columns, The Silver and Gold of Recruiting Technology and The Recruiter's Patrol Order.

      The Silver and Gold of Recruiting Technology explains why recruiters should not only implement but master both new and old methods of recruiting.

      The Recruiter's Patrol Order lists the tactics and strategies recruiters should use to successfully find qualified talent.

      Click here to visit the SWE Career Center.

      Leverage Your Career Recruiting Efforts with Insights from an Expert

      Peter Weddle, a recruiter, HR consultant and business CEO, offers insight into leveraging the Career Center and creating a strong presence in his columns, The Silver and Gold of Recruiting Technology and The Recruiter's Patrol Order.

      The Silver and Gold of Recruiting Technology explains why recruiters should not only implement but master both new and old methods of recruiting.

      The Recruiter's Patrol Order lists the tactics and strategies recruiters should use to successfully find qualified talent.

      Click here to visit the SWE Career Center.

      iRelaunch

       

      iRelaunch

      On a career break and considering returning to work? 

      Register now to participate in one of the Career Relaunch Forums:

      • March 11 at UC Irvine
      • April 22 at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management
      • May 5 at Rice University’s Jones Graduate School of Business

      These events are produced by the career re-entry programming company, iRelaunch, whose founders are the authors of acclaimed career re-entry strategy book, Back on the Career Track, and is sponsored by prestigious employers. The program includes a compelling lineup of speakers, panelists, workshops and networking time with sponsors. SWE members receive a $30 discount off the Forum registration fee. Type SWE in the "How did you find out about us?" box on the online registration form, and you will receive a $30 credit within 48 hours. Click here for more information and to register.

       

       

      GM

      GM As a SWE member it’s easy to get a great deal on a new GM vehicle, and you can combine your discount with the most current incentives.  Just follow the four easy steps below:
      1. Log into My SWE Communities.Go to the Member Discounts community to get your SWE "company code."
      2. Visit gmsupplierdiscount.com, enter the SWE Company Code and sign in
      3. Follow the prompts to obtain your Personal Authorization Number
      4. Take your Personal Authorization Number to a participating dealer to receive your vehicle discount


      GEICO

      GeicoToday, more than ever, it truly pays to be a member of SWE.  GEICO and SWE have worked together to bring you an exclusive savings opportunity on car insurance.  Contact GEICO today to receive your free quote.  New GEICO policyholders report average annual savings of $500, and you could save more when you mention your SWE affiliation.  And once you're a GEICO policyholder, you'll receive prompt, professional service 24/7.  GEICO is also able to help you find great rates on homeowners, renters, umbrella, and even motorcycle coverage.  Take advantage of your SWE discount and find out how much GEICO could save you!

      Click here or call 1-800-368-2734 for a free rate quote today!

      Whirlpool Corporation

      Whirlpool As a SWE member, you are eligible to receive substantial savings on products for your kitchen, laundry room, garage and home using the VIPLINKTM program by Whirlpool Corporation.  Save on popular brands including Whirlpool®, KitchenAid®, Maytag®, Amana® and GladiatorTM GarageWorks.  Save on energy too!  No one in the industry offers you more choices for ENERGY STAR® qualifying products.

      Program benefits include:

      • Buy up to 12 appliances a year
      • Purchase for family living in the U.S.
      • Low cost delivery or free pick-up at designated Whirlpool locations*
      • Monthly promotions that offer extra savings

      To use this program, log onto http://partners.whirlpool.com and 'Create an Account' using the SWE Member Group Code**. Once registered, you can enjoy the special pricing from Whirlpool Corporation. Don't forget to visit the VIPLINKTM home page for monthly promotions that offer additional savings above and beyond the already low discounted prices!

      Confidential Program:Whirlpool's VIPLINKTM program and pricing is confidential and MUST NOT be mentioned or used to negotiate a deal when shopping in a store.  Violations may result in losing program eligibility. Only the eligible member may register and logon to the website.

      If you have any questions, please contact VIPLINKTM by calling 866-808-9274, M-F, 8-6 EST, emailing Every_Home_Partners@whirlpool.com or via live chat from the website.

      *Terms and conditions apply, log onto partners.whirlpool.com and click on Terms of Use for complete program details.

      ** To get your SWE Member Group Code, log onto MySWE Communities and go to the Member Discounts Community. 

      UCLA Extension Program

      UCLA Started in 1955, UCLA Extension's Technical Management Program provides new and seasoned managers in technical and other fields with the tools and knowledge to become inspiring leaders and enhance their personal and organizational skills.

      Participants create their own personalized program by choosing four courses from a selection of 25 in the areas of strategic planning, team building, communication, creative thinking and project management. This one-week program is offered in March and September each year, and is continuously updated with the help of an advisory board of industry leaders and feedback from participants of the program.  The program has served major organizations like Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Northrop Grumman, Boeing, Symantec, Beckman Coulter, ExxonMobil, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, DirecTV, Chevron and many more.  More than 15,000 people from around the world have attended the program in the past 55 years.

      The program offers a working retreat on the beautiful UCLA campus.  Away from work and other distractions, participants focus on enhancing leadership skills, learning the latest business trends and paradigms, and discovering new ways to solve problems, plan strategies and motivate colleagues.

      Click here for the complete program description.

      SWE members receive a 15 percent discount off the regular program price.

      Washington Spotlight January 2012

      SWE to Hold Capitol Hill Day March 21-22, 2012

      The SWE Government Relations and Public Policy (GRPP) Committee will once again be organizing a spring Congressional outreach day on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. This event, which will be held March 21-22, 2012, will increase awareness of the need for and the importance of increased diversity and inclusion in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce. 

      Like last year, SWE will be taking the lead in organizing this event, and is in the process of reaching out to other STEM organizations to solicit their interest in participating. SWE’s “2012 Capitol Hill Day: Diversity and Inclusion Drives Innovation in STEM” event will begin promptly at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, March 21, 2012, and conclude by 5 p.m. on Thursday, March 22, 2012. This event is being made possible by a grant from the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation.

      While there are no specific volunteer travel funds available for this event, some meals will be provided for attendees. 

      Please note: Space is limited and reservations will be handled on a first-come, first-served basis. Geographic diversity will also be considered.

      If you are interesting in participating or have any questions, please contact Karen Horton, GRPP Chair, at grpp-chair@swe.org.

      Department of Education Math and Science Partnership Program Saved from Elimination in FY 2012

      In the FY 2012 omnibus funding bill, the Department of Education Math and Science Partnership (MSP) program received $150 million, down from $175 million in FY 2011. This was a rosier scenario than originally envisioned, since the House Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Subcommittee had targeted it for elimination.

      SWE has been a longtime supporter of the MSP program, and recently signed onto a STEM Education Coalition letter to House and Senate leadership encouraging them to continue their support for effective and focused STEM education programs, including MSP, at the Department of Education and the National Science Foundation.

      A copy of the letter is available online for review.

      Other big winners in the omnibus bill that were targeted for elimination or reduction by the House were President Obama’s three signature programs: the Race to the Top initiative ($550 million), the Investing in Innovation grant program ($150 million) and the School Improvement Grants ($536.4 million). 

      Seven States Win New Race to the Top Competition

      On December 23, the Department of Education announced that seven states—Arizona, Colorado, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, New Jersey and Pennsylvania—will receive a portion of the $200 million in the Race to the Top Round 3 (RTT3) fund, which “focuses on supporting efforts to leverage comprehensive statewide reform, while also improving science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.” Their grants range in size, based on each state's student population, from $17 million for Colorado, Kentucky and Louisiana to nearly $43 million for Illinois. All of these states were runners-up in the last Race to the Top competition.

      Even with this stated emphasis on STEM, some education experts are questioning how much RTT3 will benefit STEM education, since the winning states will primarily use this money to implement part of their original Race to the Top plans and do not have to spend it explicitly on STEM programming. These plans focused on making progress in one of the core areas of the economic-stimulus legislation, i.e. turning around low-performing schools, raising standards or improving evaluation systems.

      The Department of Education recently released a summary document that includes a few more details of what states plan to spend their funding on. Arizona is one of multiple states that plans to focus on STEM as they transition to the Common Core State Standards. Louisiana, on the other hand, plans to embed STEM throughout its reform work. Kentucky and Colorado will build on existing STEM efforts, while Illinois will build a "public-private infrastructure to support STEM integration across the curriculum.”

      This announcement came on the heels of some bad news for the Race to the Top (RTT) program. On December 21, federal officials cited Hawaii for "unsatisfactory performance" on its Race to the Top grant, and placed the state on "high-risk" status. Because of this status, the state will now “have to ask the department for permission before spending any more of its $75 million or will face an extensive on-site review and increased reporting requirements.” The Department also indicated if Hawaii did not comply, it could be in danger of losing its grant altogether.

      Counterbalancing this bad news; however, was the fact that Congress included an additional $550 million for Race to the Top in its recently-passed omnibus spending bill for fiscal year 2012. The omnibus bill also provided language that would allow the Department to create a district-level competition and continue the investment in the Early Learning Challenge.

      White House Releases STEM Ed Inventory

      On December 15, the White House National Science and Technology Council released a new inventory of the federal government’s spending on STEM education. In total, the report says the federal government spends $3.4 billion on STEM education programs, which are spread across 13 federal agencies. While other analyses have argued that there is much redundancy and overlap between federal STEM education programs, the report determines this issue may have been overstated. 

Some highlights of the report include:

      • “Of the $3.4 billion total, nearly $1 billion is spent on activities that target the specific workforce needs of particular agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Transportation;
      • The remainder of the money is spent on broader STEM education matters, dominated by funding from the NSF and the Education Department;
      • About $1.1 billion has as its primary goal targeting populations underrepresented in the STEM fields (such as African Americans, Hispanics and females);
      • 24 investments totaling $312 million have the primary goal of improving teacher effectiveness;
      • 80 percent of all the federal spending comes from three agencies: the NSF ($1.2 billion), the Department of Education ($1 billion) and the Department of Health and Human Services ($577 million); and
      • About 60 percent of all the federal spending targets K-12 education, with the rest directed at the postsecondary level.”

      The aforementioned report was required by the America COMPETES Act. In addition, per the America COMPETES Act, the White House must develop a five-year strategic plan for advancing STEM education, which is expected out early next year.

      House Republications Likely to Write Their Own NCLB Bill

      On December 16, House Education and Workforce Committee Chairman John Kline (R-MN) said that the Committee has been working for months on a bipartisan re-write of the “No Child Left Behind Law,” but the two parties are not able to reach agreement. Therefore, Republican lawmakers are likely to write their own bill since the two sides are too far apart on sticky issues like accountability.

      In his statement, Chairman Kline said, “Since the start of the 112th Congress, education reform has been a top priority for the committee and my Republican colleagues. We convened 11 hearings and invited dozens of witnesses to describe the challenges and opportunities facing the nation's schools. My colleagues and I also spent months engaged in bipartisan talks on the way forward for reform of the elementary and secondary education act. There were several areas where we forged new agreement, but others in which we ultimately could not come to a consensus. The urgency to reform the law has not changed. I look forward to a robust debate once legislation is introduced in the coming weeks.”

      A partisan ESEA bill in the House is a big development, since it might dampen the likelihood that the reauthorization would be completed before the end of President Barack Obama's first term. While ESEA is not always passed by large bipartisan majorities as NCLB did in 2001, it is typically crafted in a bipartisan fashion.

      Further complicating matters is the fact that Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Chairman Tom Harkin (D-IA) has said he won't seek to advance the Senate Committee-passed bill to the Senate floor until the House approves a bipartisan product.

      SWE has been supportive of Senate Merkley’s “Preparing Our Students for the Success in the Global Economy Act,” which was integrated as the STEM-related title of the Senate ESEA bill. SWE recently signed onto a STEM Coalition letter expressing support for the bill.

      Therefore, if Congress does not take action, the administration's waivers will become “the main vehicle for fixing the controversial law.” 

      New Report Warns That U.S. Student Science Achievement Threatened by Alarming State Variations in Measuring Learning

      “All Over the Map,” a recent report released by Change the Equation (CTEq)—a network of more than 100 CEOs dedicated to creating widespread literacy in STEM—at the National Governor Association’s STEM Summit in Durham, N.C., finds that U.S. students risk falling behind in science education due to radically inconsistent state definitions of proficiency. While teachers and parents are being told that students are meeting the standard for eighth-grade proficiency set by their state, they may actually be performing at levels substantially below their international counterparts and go on to struggle in high school, college and their careers.

      For the first time, researchers put state definitions of “proficiency” in eighth-grade science against a common measuring stick – the 2009 National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) eighth-grade science test. NAEP is a project of the U.S. Department of Education that measures student knowledge and achievement nationally. NAEP defines “basic” as “…partial mastery of prerequisite knowledge and skills that are fundamental for proficient work at each grade,” which is insufficient for the learning that students need to put them on a path to success in college-level science.

      The results are startling. For example, what one state may deem to be “proficient” may be classified as “basic” or well below grade level in another state:

      • Fifteen states have set the bar for “proficiency” below NAEP’s threshold for “basic” knowledge
      • Only four states have set the bar near or above NAEP’s bar for proficiency. Louisiana, New Mexico and Mississippi have more rigorous performance standards for students than states like Connecticut, New York and Maryland that are generally thought to have high-quality, competitive schools
      • Virginia has the lowest definition of “proficient,” followed by Tennessee, Michigan, North Carolina, Iowa, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Georgia, Maryland, Texas, Oregon, South Carolina, California and Arizona. All have set their definitions for achievement below NAEP’s standard for “basic” science learning. Just four states (Louisiana, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire) are at or above NAEP’s standard for proficiency

      One of CTEq’s member organizations, Intel, also recently conducted a survey to identify how to encourage more young people to choose engineering as a career. The survey offers several ideas:

      • Talk about how rewarding it is to be an engineer
      • Describe it as a positive challenge, rather than as merely difficult
      • Give it a human face
      • Stress its benefits to society

      Additional suggestions on how to promote engineering careers among young students are available at the National Academy of Engineering website

      AZ School District to Offer STEM Diplomas

      Starting next school year, the Chandler Unified School District in Arizona recently announced plans to offer two specialized STEM diplomas at one of its high schools, Perry High School in Gilbert. The two diplomas are called the “STEM Diploma” program and the more rigorous STEM “Scholar Diploma” program, and will emphasize project-based learning and provide students with what the district calls "real-world" experiences.

      If enrolled in either diploma programs, students would take more rigorous, STEM coursework than is generally required to graduate, including five credits of math, (including AP Statistics) and six credits of science (or a combination of science and engineering coursework). If enrolled in the STEM Scholar diploma, students would be required to take AP Chemistry, Physics and Calculus, as well as a course on differential equations. Available electives also include human biology, biotechnology, and computer science. In addition, students must take a full load of non-STEM courses, including AP English and American History.

      The district is also working with local universities, i.e. Arizona State University Polytechnic, to provide opportunities for students to take college courses. Additional requirements for the students include attendance at STEM workshops, as well as the completion of a job-shadow experience before their senior year.

      These STEM diplomas were modeled after similar programs at Benton High School in Louisiana and CREST, a small specialty school in Paradise Valley, AZ.

      Washington Spotlight November 2011

      SWE Supports Senate STEM Education Bill, Included in Senate ESEA Reauthorization

      On October 19-20, the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee held the mark-up of its version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Reauthorization Act (ESEA). Included in the 800-plus page bill is S. 1675, the "Preparing Students for Success in the Global Economy Act," legislation introduced earlier this month by Senator Jeff Merkley (D-OR) to reauthorize and strengthen the current Math and Science Partnership Program at the Department of Education.

      S.1675 aims to improve student achievement in the STEM fields by providing an array of competitive grants to states and districts, which would transition to formula-based grants after a threshold-funding level is reached. The goals of the bill are as follows:

      • Improve student engagement in, and increase student access to, courses in STEM subjects
      • Strengthen quality STEM instruction and professional development programs
      • Recruit, train and support highly effective teachers in STEM subjects and provide robust tools and supports for students and teachers
      • Close student achievement gaps, and prepare more students to be on track to college and career readiness and success in these subjects
      • Require states to develop a statewide STEM education plans

      The text of Senator Merkley’s bill can be found at http://thomas.loc.gov, and by searching by bill number.

      The STEM Education Coalition, of which SWE is an affiliate member, worked closely with Senator Merkley over the last several months to craft this comprehensive STEM education bill, which directly reflects a number of the Coalition’s core policy objectives. SWE recently signed onto a STEM Education Coalition letter to Senator Merkley endorsing the bill, which said, "We are very pleased that your proposed legislation will encourage and inspire more of our best and brightest students—especially those from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups—to study in STEM fields, improve the content knowledge and professional skills of the STEM educator workforce, recruit and retain highly-skilled STEM educators, and improve the resources available for learning in STEM subjects."

      While the Senate HELP Committee approved the bill 15-7 and the Committee leaders would like for the bill to be considered by the end of the year, Education Week said in an article on October 31 that it would be a "tall order, given the short and crowded legislative calendar, polarized political climate, and lack of consensus within the K-12 community on issues—such as accountability and teacher quality—at the heart of the law."

      New NAEP Results: Math Scores Increase, Reading Basically Flat

      On November 1, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), also known as the "Nation's Report Card," released its 2011 report cards for reading and mathematics. The results showed the highest mathematics scores to date for U.S. 4th and 8th graders, while U.S. student reading performance was mixed with fourth grade reading scores flat. The 2011 assessments were administered by the National Center for Education Statistics at the U.S. Department of Education.

      An Education Week analysis of the report cards said that, "Since 1992, the average scale score in 4th grade reading has climbed just 4 points, to 221, on a 0-to-500 scale. At the 8th grade, the average score has risen 5 points. By contrast, in math, 4th grade scores have climbed 21 points over the same time period, and 16 points for 8th graders. From 2009 to 2011, the figures at both grade levels climbed 1 point, as well as 8th grade reading."

      Achieving proficiency in reading and math, however, still remains an unattainable goal for most U.S. students. The 2011 data shows that only about one-third of U.S. students reach that level or higher in reading or 8th grade math. Looking at 4th grade math scores, the number is only slightly higher at 40 percent.

      In addition, large achievement gaps remain among racial and ethnic groups, especially when comparing Hispanic and African American students to Caucasian students. Although progress has been made across all groups over the past 20 years, the achievement gaps have not narrowed significantly. In fact, "the 2011 reading and math results produced no statistically significant changes in the black-white achievement gap from 2009."

      Report Shows Teachers' Evaluations in Some "Race to the Top" States are Lacking

      The National Council on Teacher Quality recently released a report that says that the following four Race to the Top states are so far not providing “high-quality, ambitious teacher evaluation plans:” Georgia, Hawaii, Massachusetts and North Carolina.

      Critiques of the aforementioned states include:

      • The fact that Georgia’s teacher-evaluation plan is limited to just 26 of its 181 districts (however, its Race to the Top promises are also limited to this 26)
      • The vagueness of North Carolina's new standard that requires teachers to "contribute to the academic success of students"
      • The lack of a requirement of student performance measures to be a "significant factor" in teacher evaluations
      • The lack of movement by Hawaiian officials to redesign their teacher evaluation system

      Eight of the remaining Race to the Top winners, as well as nine non-Race to the Top states, are praised in the report for “adopting through law or regulation ambitious teacher evaluation policies that include objective evidence of student learning and mandate student achievement and/or student growth will 'significantly' inform or be the preponderant criterion for evaluations.” Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada and Oklahoma are the nine non-Race to the Top states mentioned in the report.

      An overview of other findings in the report is also available online.

      House Science Subcommittee Holds Hearing on “What Makes for Successful K-12 STEM Education”

      On Wednesday, October 12, the Subcommittee on Research and Science Education of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee held a hearing to review and examine the findings of the National Research Council report, "Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics," as requested by Congress in 2009 to identify highly successful K-12 schools and programs in STEM.

      The report identifies three goals for successful STEM education in the United States:

      • Expand the number of students who ultimately pursue advanced degrees and careers in STEM fields and broaden the participation of women and minorities in those fields
      • Expand the STEM-capable workforce and broaden the participation of women and minorities in that workforce
      • Increase STEM literacy for all students, including those who do not pursue STEM-related careers or additional study in the STEM disciplines

      In his opening statement, Research and Science Education Subcommittee Chairman Mo Brooks (R-AL) noted the importance of early STEM Education. "Whether we are preparing students for advanced degrees in STEM or ensuring that young adults have the scientific and mathematic literacy to thrive in a 21st century technology-based economy, the foundation for both of these begins in our K-12 schools," Brooks said.

      Highlights of the hearing may be read online

      Washington Spotlight October 2011

      SWE Leaders Present for White House Announcement of New Workplace Flexibility Policies

      SWE President Melissa Tata and Past President Siddika Demir, along with other leaders from the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and diversity communities, joined First Lady Michelle Obama on September 26 at the White House where she spoke about the importance of supporting and retaining women and girls in STEM careers. The event focused on the “Career-Life Balance Initiative,” a 10-year plan sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and supported by the White House Council on Women and Girls and Office of Science and Technology Policy to provide greater workplace flexibility for researchers in the STEM fields. Among the best practices that NSF will expand Foundation-wide are ones that will allow researchers to delay or suspend their grants for up to one year in order to care for a newborn or newly adopted child or fulfill other family obligations.

      In addition, SWE member Prinda Wanakule, who will receive the 2011 Outstanding Graduate Collegiate Award at WE11, attended the event and was invited to meet with the First Lady prior to the event to share her story.

      NSF has launched targeted workplace flexibility efforts in the past, but the new initiative is the first to be applied Foundation-wide to help postdoctoral fellows and early-career faculty members more easily care for dependents while continuing their careers. The new initiative will offer a coherent and consistent set of family-friendly policies and practices to help eliminate some of the barriers to women’s advancement and retention in STEM careers. It will:

      • Allow postponement of grants for child birth/adoption – Grant recipients can defer their awards for up to one year to care for their newborn or newly adopted children.
      • Allow grant suspension for parental leave – Grant recipients who wish to suspend their grants to take parental leave can extend those grants by a comparable duration at no cost.
      • Provide supplements to cover research technicians – Principal investigators (PIs) can apply for stipends to pay research technicians or equivalent staff to maintain labs while PIs are on family leave.
      • Publicize the availability of family-friendly opportunities – NSF will issue announcements and revise current program solicitations to expressly promote these opportunities to eligible awardees.
      • Promote family friendliness for panel reviewers – STEM researchers who review the grant proposals of their peers will have greater opportunities to conduct virtual reviews rather than travel to a central location, increasing flexibility and reducing dependent-care needs.
      • Support research and evaluation – NSF will continue to encourage the submission of proposals for research that would assess the effectiveness of policies aimed at keeping women in the STEM pipeline.
      • Leverage and expand partnerships – NSF will leverage existing relationships with academic institutions to encourage the extension of the tenure clock and allow for dual hiring opportunities.

      The previous day, a related op-ed appeared in the Washington Post by Tina Tchen, White House Council on Women and Girls Executive Director, and Valerie Jarrett, a senior adviser to President Obama, which is accessible online.

      Appropriations Committee Releases Draft Labor, Health and Human Services and Education Bill

      On September 29, the House Appropriations Committee released its draft Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies bill, which contains proposed FY 2012 funding for the Department of Education. Thirty-one Department of Education programs are eliminated in the draft bill, including the Math and Science Partnership (MSP) program and two of the Obama Administration signature initiatives—the Race to the Top program and the Investing in Innovation (I3) program.

      In releasing the bill, House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers (R-KY) said, “Many of the programs and services funded in this bill protect the health and safety of the American people and provide assistance to the most vulnerable among us. However, excessive and wasteful spending over the years has put many of the programs and agencies funded in this bill on an irresponsible and unsustainable fiscal path. To protect critical programs and services that many Americans rely on—especially in this time of fiscal crisis—the bill takes decisive action to cut duplicative, inefficient, and wasteful spending to help get these agency budgets onto sustainable financial footing.”

      The bill does, however, include some significant increases for two popular formal programs, which provide money to all 50 states. In the bill, Title 1 grants to districts for disadvantaged kids would see a $1 billion boost (up to nearly $16 billion), while special education funding would also increase by $1.2 billion (up to $13.7 billion).

      House Labor, HHS and Education Appropriations Subcommittee Ranking Member Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) raised strong concerns about the draft bill, and called on Subcommittee Chairman Denny Rehberg (R-MT) to convene a meeting of the Subcommittee to discuss the bill.  At this time, no Subcommittee mark-up has been scheduled. 

      An Education Week analysis of the bill is also available online.

      President Obama Announces NCLB Waiver Process

      On September 23, President Obama outlined how states can request flexibility from the Department of Education from specific mandates contained within the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law.

      In his remarks, President Obama said, “To help states, districts and schools that are ready to move forward with education reform, our administration will provide flexibility from the law in exchange for a real commitment to undertake change. The purpose is not to give states and districts a reprieve from accountability, but rather to unleash energy to improve our schools at the local level.”
      To receive a waiver, “states will have to adopt college- and career-ready standards and tie state tests to them, adopt a differentiated accountability system that focuses on 15 percent of the most troubled schools, and create guidelines for teacher and principal evaluation systems that will be based in part on student growth and used for personnel decisions.”

      Finally, Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee Chairman Tom Harkin (D-IA) recently announced the Committee would mark-up its version of the NCLB reauthorization bill on October 18. 

      Senators Introduce Series of Bills to “Fix” No Child Left Behind

      U.S. Senators Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Richard Burr (R-NC), Johnny Isakson (R-GA) and Mark Kirk (R-IL)—all members of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee—recently introduced a series of education bills to “fix” No Child Left Behind. The legislation would end some of the federal mandates that decide which schools and teachers are succeeding or failing while maintaining No Child Left Behind requirements for reporting student performance in reading, math and science.

      The legislation would address what the senators said were major problems with the law by giving states and local school districts greater flexibility to:

      • Improve state accountability systems
      • Improve teacher and principal professional development programs
      • Consolidate federal education programs to give state and local education leaders more freedom in meeting local needs
      • Expand the number of charter schools

      The four bills are summarized as follows:

      • The Elementary and Secondary Education Amendments Act of 2011 (S. 1571), introduced by Senators Isakson and Alexander, would establish a national “college- and career-readiness” goal with accountability systems developed by states without interference by the federal government on state standards or assessments. It would eliminate the Washington-based Adequate Yearly Progress system and ask states to identify their lowest-performing five percent of schools. It also allows states to establish their own teacher licensure and certification requirements; maintains public reporting requirements; and, dramatically simplifies the Title 1 State plans to reduce paperwork and federal interference.
      • The Teacher and Principal Improvement Act of 2011 (S. 1567), introduced by Senators Alexander and Isakson, would help states and local school districts prepare, train and recruit effective teachers and principals to improve student achievement. States and local school districts would be allowed to develop their own teacher and principal evaluation systems, as well as their own needs assessments to better pinpoint professional development for teachers and principals. It would maintain strong reporting requirements to empower parents and the community. It would also authorize the Teacher Incentive Fund to allow states and school districts to compete to find ways to pay teachers and principals more for teaching well and reduce paperwork through simplified Title II State plans.
      • The Empowering Local Education Decision Making Act of 2011 (S. 1569), introduced by Senators Burr, Alexander and Isakson, would streamline 59 programs into two flexible foundational block grants. It would put states and local school districts in charge by allowing them the flexibility to choose the programs and initiatives that meet their unique needs. The bill would also create the “Fund for the Improvement of Teaching and Learning” and the “Safe and Healthy Students Block Grant.”
      • The Empowering Parents Through Quality Charter Schools Act 2011 (S. 1566), introduced by Senators Kirk, Alexander and Burr, would modernize the Charter School Program by encouraging the expansion of successful charter school models, streamlining the program to reduce administrative burdens and improving funding opportunities, allowing successful charter school management organizations and local education agencies to apply directly to the federal government, and encourages sharing of best practices between charter schools and traditional public schools.

      The text of each of the bills is available at http://thomas.loc.gov by searching by bill number.

      Commerce’s Economics and Statistics Administration Releases Third and Final STEM Report

      Acting U.S. Commerce Secretary Rebecca Blank unveiled findings from the Economics and Statistics Administration’s (ESA) third and final report on STEM jobs and education at a recent Brookings Institution forum on advancing STEM education in the United States. “Education Supports Racial and Ethnic Equality in STEM” analyzes the demographic composition and educational background of STEM workers, looking at representation disparities within these critical fields that promote U.S. innovation and economic competitiveness. 

      Findings suggest that across all racial and ethnic groups, higher college graduation rates are associated with higher shares of STEM workers, and these workers earn substantial wage premiums over their non-STEM counterparts, regardless of their background. Non-Hispanic Whites and Asians have much higher college graduation rates than Hispanics, non-Hispanic Blacks and other racial and ethnic groups (including American Indians and Alaska Natives), and are more prominently represented in STEM jobs. With greater equality in educational attainment, the report finds that demographic disparities within the STEM workforce can be diminished, helping to boost STEM employment and U.S. leadership in technology and innovation.

      Other key findings of the most recent report include:

      • Non-Hispanic Whites comprise the largest group of STEM workers, accounting for about seven out of ten STEM workers, which aligns closely with their share of the overall workforce
      • Non-Hispanic Asians are most likely (42 percent) to graduate college with a STEM degree, while the propensities of other groups are all fairly similar (17-22 percent)
      • Half of all non-Hispanic Asian workers with STEM degrees have STEM jobs, compared to 30 percent of Hispanics and non-Hispanic Black and American Indian or Alaska Native workers
      • One in five STEM workers is foreign born, of which 63 percent come from Asia
      • STEM workers in all demographic groups, including the foreign born, earn more than their non-STEM counterparts. Hispanics and non-Hispanic Blacks receive a significantly larger STEM premium than do non-Hispanic Whites

      “Education Supports Racial and Ethnic Equality in STEM” is the third in a series of ESA reports focused on science, technology, engineering and math employment in the United States. The first, “STEM: Good Jobs Now and For the Future,” released in July, profiles STEM workers and the critical role STEM jobs play in advancing American innovation and competitiveness. The second report, released in August, “Women in STEM: A Gender Gap to Innovation,” examines the gender disparity among STEM workers. The most recent report is available online.

      “Hispanic College Enrollment Spikes, Narrowing Gaps with Other Groups”: Pew Report

      Driven by a single-year surge of 24 percent in Hispanic enrollment, the overall number of 18- to 24-year-olds attending college in the United States hit an all-time high of 12.2 million in October 2010, according to a Pew Hispanic Center analysis of recently released data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

      College-age Hispanics accounted for 1.8 million, or 15 percent, of the overall enrollment of young adults in two- or four-year colleges in 2010—setting records both for their number and share of young college students. More Hispanic young adults enrolled in college from 2009 to 2010 than young blacks and young Asian Americans. The number of young whites enrolling in college decreased during that period.

      Rising educational attainment was a dominant driver of the enrollment trends for young Hispanic adults, over the long term as well as in recent years. Hispanic educational attainment rose sharply from 2009 to 2010—the share of Hispanic 18- to 24-year-olds who have completed high school increased to 73 percent in 2010 from 70 percent in 2009, and the share of young Hispanic high school graduates who are attending college increased to 44 percent in 2010 from 39 percent in 2009.

      Washington Spotlight December 2011

      Seven States Apply for RTT3 Funding

      On November 23, the U.S. Department of Education announced that seven states (Arizona, Colorado, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, New Jersey and Pennsylvania) were eligible for a share of $200 million in the Race to the Top Round 3 (RTT3) funds. These states had each narrowly missed getting funding in the last Race to the Top Round, which awarded $4 billion.

      For RTT3, each of the seven states had to complete applications, which included commitments to enhance data systems, raise academic standards, improve principal and teacher support and evaluation systems and implement school interventions in under-performing schools. In addition, by December 16, each of the seven applicants must provide a detailed narrative and budget.

      RTT3 focuses on supporting efforts to leverage comprehensive statewide reform, while also improving science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Round Three awards will be announced in late December. Award amounts within the $200 million fund are based on state population and are anticipated to range from $12 million to $49 million.

      Two other states, California and South Carolina, were also eligible to apply, but California submitted an incomplete application and South Carolina declined to apply, due to a major turnover in leadership since the last round.

      Six More States Sign on to Help Draft Science Standards

      On November 29, Achieve, the non-governmental organization that is facilitating the writing of the upcoming new Next Generation science standards, announced that six more states recently agreed to join the effort. The states are Arkansas, Delaware, Illinois, Montana, North Carolina and Oregon. Twenty-six states are now assisting Achieve.

      In the press release , Achieve’s President Michael Cohen said, “A majority of the states, educating more than 50 percent of our nation's students, have committed to developing the Next Generation Science Standards, and they should be commended.”

      Originally, Achieve was planning to have a much smaller group of states play a lead role in developing the standards, but decided instead to include all interested states. It should also be noted that just because a state is in this leadership role with Achieve, it does not commit the state to adopting the standards. But upon completion, participating states are expected to “give serious consideration” to adoption.

      The Next Generation Science Standards are based on the science framework recently developed by the National Research Council (NRC) in July 2011. For more information about this framework, please see the July 25 edition of Capitol Update.

      Congress Approves Agriculture – CJS – Transportation “Minibus”

      On Thursday, November 18, Congress approved the FY 2012 “minibus” (House Report 112-284) authorizing funding for the Departments of Agriculture and Transportation, as well as funding for those agencies under the umbrella of the Commerce, Justice and Science Appropriations Subcommittee. The package also contains a Continuing Resolution (CR) to avoid a government shutdown and continue federal operations until December 16, 2011, or until Congress completes the remaining nine FY 2012 Appropriations bills. The “minibus” was approved by a vote of 298 to 121 in the House of Representatives and 70 to 30 in the Senate. The President signed the “minibus” into law the following day.

      The CJS section of the conference report includes a base total of $52.7 billion, a decrease of $583 million below last year’s level, and a decrease of almost $5 billion below the President’s request. Specifically, the legislation funds NSF at $7 billion, which is $173 million or 2.5 percent above last year’s level but $734 million below the President’s request.

      The full 401-page conference report is available online.

      NASA Expands Women@NASA Website to Encourage Girls to Pursue STEM Careers

      The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has expanded its Women@NASA website to include Aspire 2 Inspire, a new feature aimed at helping middle school girls explore education and careers in the STEM fields.

      The site features four short films and one overview film that explore the careers and backgrounds of early-career women who work for NASA in each of the STEM areas. A list of community organizations and NASA-affiliated outreach programs with a STEM emphasis also is available. The site also features four Twitter feeds where visiting girls can interact with, and submit questions to, the young women featured in the films.

      "We have an opportunity to reach out to the next generation and inspire today's girls to pursue science and technology careers," said Rebecca Keiser, the agency's associate director for agency-level policy integration and representative to the White House Council on Women and Girls. "Expanding opportunities in these fields will give our country perspectives and expertise that will help us out-innovate, out-educate and out-build the world. It's key to our future." 

      National Competition Selects 12 Libraries and Museums to Build Innovative Learning Labs for Teens

      The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation recently announced the first 12 winners of a national competition to build 21st Century learning labs in museums and libraries around the country. The winners, four museums and eight libraries, will receive a total of $1.2 million in grants to plan and design the labs. Inspired by YOUMedia, a new teen space at the Chicago Public Library, and innovations in science and technology centers, these labs will help young people move beyond consuming content to making and creating it. The competition was announced in answer to President Obama's “Educate to Innovate" campaign, a nationwide effort to bring American students to the forefront in science and math.

      The learning labs will be based on new research about how young people learn today. Teens will use both digital and traditional media that promote creativity, critical thinking and hands-on learning. The labs will connect teens to mentors and peers, as well as anytime, anywhere access to information through online social networks so that they can pursue their interests more deeply. The winning institutions will match the funds from the competition and partner with local educational, cultural and civic organizations to build a network of learning opportunities for young people.

      The 12 recipients of this round of grants were selected out of a pool of 98 applicants from 32 states. Applications were evaluated by professionals with relevant expertise in digital media and learning and museum and library management. Winners will participate, in-person and online, in a community of practice that will provide technical assistance, networking and cross-project learning. Application materials for a second round of grants will be available in spring 2012.

      Study Highlights “Power of More Time” for Science Learning

      A report issued in mid-November by the National Center on Time & Learning laments the science achievement levels of U.S. students overall and cites studies suggesting that science instruction in the elementary grades has increasingly been squeezed out of the curriculum. The report, “Strengthening Science Education: The Power of More Time to Deepen Inquiry and Engagement,” makes the case for restructuring the school calendar to allow more learning time for science, and through a set of case studies seeks to explain promising approaches to make the most of that extra time.

      "At just the moment when science education is reaching a crisis, the dedication of public schools to teaching the subject is declining, for the simple reason that science has been edged out as a priority," says the report. It notes in particular the influence of the federal No Child Left Behind Act, with its emphasis on improving test scores in reading and mathematics.

      The case studies highlight five regular public schools that serve large populations of disadvantaged students. The report identifies a number of "key successful practices" across all five schools, from integrating more hands-on learning activities and facilitating more scientific discourse in the classroom to creating connections for students to science careers and role models through collaborations with outside partners.

      In the end, the National Center on Time & Learning contends, "Without fundamentally restructuring the school calendar—particularly at the elementary and middle school levels—to add more learning time and prioritizing science during that time, most American students will simply not spend enough time to become either proficient in, or excited about, science."

      Both a four-page executive summary and the entire report are available online.

      White House Honors Twelve Champions of Change for Girls and Women in STEM, SWE in Attendance

      On Friday, December 9, twelve local leaders in the effort to recruit and retain girls and women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields were honored at the White House as Champions of Change. The men and women being honored, who included teachers, industry leaders, students, and non-profit leaders, have each taken great strides to reduce the barriers that drive many girls and women to turn away from high-paying, highly rewarding careers as the nation’s top innovators.

      The engineering community was well represented within this group by: Shorma Bianca Bailey, a senior chemical engineering student at Howard University who hopes to pursue a Ph.D. in environmental engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the fall; Jennifer Harper Ogle, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Glenn Department of Civil Engineering at Clemson University; Karen A. Thole, Ph.D., P.E., professor of mechanical engineering and head of the Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University, and, Tamara Brown, a chemical engineer in the medical device development industry who has developed a program called TechSavvy to inspire middle school girls to consider STEM fields. In addition, SWE was mentioned both by Bailey and Thole as a great resource, while Ogle has participated in local SWE outreach activities.

      “These ‘Champions of Change’ are community heroes, helping to build the ranks of women in the nation’s STEM workforce and ensuring that America’s science and engineering enterprise is fueled by the diverse talents of all of its citizens,” said Dr. John Holdren, assistant to the president for Science and Technology and director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. “The bold work of these Champions epitomizes the president’s vision of an ‘all hands on deck’ effort by government, academia, non-profits, and industry to maintain America’s leadership in STEM fields for decades to come.”

      The Champions of Change program was created as a part of President Barack Obama’s Winning the Future initiative. Each week, a different issue is highlighted and groups of Champions, ranging from educators to entrepreneurs to community activists, are recognized for the work they are doing to better their communities.

      As part of the event, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and representatives from several federal agencies participated and hosted several small group discussions between the champions and other notable guests from varying sectors and communities around engaging and supporting girls and women in STEM. These breakouts — which focused specifically on changing the stereotypes of girls in the STEM fields, mentoring, and supporting/retaining women in the STEM workforce — were followed immediately by a larger event focused on amplifying best practices learned in each area.  SWE also had a strong presence during these breakouts, and was represented by President Melissa Tata, Government Relations and Public Policy Chair Karen Horton, SWE Executive Director and CEO Betty Shanahan, SWE Deputy Executive Director Karen Horting, and SWE Washington Representative Melissa Carl.

      Click here to read more about the aforementioned Champions.

      To view an archived webcast of the event, click here.

      Help Identify SWE's Issues and Challenges to Support Strategic Planning

      Year round the Strategic Planning Committee (SPC) seeks out issues and challenges that affect the entire SWE organization. Known as Mega Issues (MIs), these overriding matters of strategic importance cut across multiple goals or outcome areas. They address key questions that SWE must answer, illuminating choices we must make and challenges we must overcome to move toward our Envisioned Future.

      Any SWE member may submit MIs online at any time. The SPC reviews all submissions, assigns “owners” to take action, and tracks them through completion in the “Mega Issue Tracking Spreadsheet,” posted in the Governance Community in MySWE Communities.

      The SPC relies on, and greatly appreciates, your input. Please submit your ideas today!

      The Strategic Planning Committee and Senate Mega Issue Team:

      • Stacey Delvecchio, SPC Chair
      • Holli Pheil, SPC Chair-Elect
      • Sally Rautio, Senate MI Chair
      • Hope Toole, SPC MI Team
      • Prinda Wanakule, SPC MI Team

       

      Complete Your Profile Today

      Keep your member profile complete and up-to-date in the membership system to ensure other members, and SWE, can reach you!

      Simply login to your profile and tab through each field to update personal information, education and alternate contact information. Please pay particularly close attention to the completion of fields for:

          •    Company
          •    University
          •    Preferred Mailing Address
          •    Preferred Email Address

      In updating your profile, you are helping to form an accurate portrayal of SWE as a membership organization and are ensuring that your section maintains current statistics to aid in potential grant requests.

      If you have any questions on this process, please email membership@swe.org.

      2012 Wow! That’s Engineering! Signature Event Sites Announced

      Since 2006, the SWE Outreach Committee has worked diligently to find, encourage and support sections in their endeavor to influence their community by hosting a Wow! That's Engineering! signature event. This year the applications were some of the best we have seen and therefore, were among the most difficult to choose. After going through 17 applications, the top five applicants were chosen by the Wow! That's Engineering! work group. The top five were then interviewed and the four recipients selected.

      “The enthusiasm everyone demonstrated was contagious,” says Randy Freedman, Outreach Manager at SWE. “I can’t wait to plan and participate in these events.”

      All 17 applications were excellent. The four sections chosen displayed the skills and ability to successfully host an event, a commitment to hard work, dedication to teamwork and an attitude of excellence, and each worked to earn the grants to host their signature events. The recipients are:

          •    Tuskegee University
          •    Las Vegas
          •    The University of Alabama
          •    The University of Hawaii

      We congratulate each section for earning the distinguished honor of being named a 2012 Wow! That's Engineering! signature event host. We look forward to the great events coming throughout the upcoming year.

      If you were not selected for a signature event grant this year, we strongly encourage you to apply again next year. In the meantime, please consider applying for a SWE Program Development Grant (PDG). PDGs are available to support activities of SWE Professional Sections, Collegiate Sections and Members At Large, and to provide funding for Society Committee pilot projects. Learn more at the Aspire K-12 Outreach website.

      My SWE Groups

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      Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum

      Help Drive SWE's Future: Vote for FY11 SWE Leadership

      The FY11 Society and region elections will be held April 1 to May 1.  Please click here for additional information or cast your ballot now.

       

      Apply to Host a Wow! That's Engineering! Event in 2010

      SWE sponsors three high-visibility Wow! That's Engineering! outreach events each year. These events provide a fun learning experience that encourages girls to consider engineering careers.

      In May of 2009 SWE Boston hosted an amazing event that brought out 150 girls and 40 volunteers. Two more events are scheduled for this year: North Alabama on September 19 and Los Angeles on November 7.

      Apply for your section to host a Wow! That’s Engineering! event in 2010. For further assistance, please contact Randy Freedman, SWE K-12 Outreach Manager at 312.596.5232.

      About SWE

      The Society of Women Engineers (SWE) is a not-for-profit educational and service organization that empowers women to succeed and advance in the engineering field, and to be recognized for their life-changing contributions as engineers and leaders. Founded in 1950, SWE is the driving force that establishes engineering as a highly desirable career for women through an array of professional development programs, networking opportunities, scholarships, awards, outreach and advocacy activities. Today we are guided by a single mission: to stimulate women to achieve full potential in careers as engineers and leaders, expand the image of the engineering profession as a positive force in improving the quality of life, and demonstrate the value of diversity.

       

       

      SWE is centered on a helping our members succeed on their own terms and continues to evolve with the challenges and opportunities reflected in today’s engineering and technology specialties. 

       

      Explore the values, principles and priorities that guide our initiatives and learn how together, we can continue to make a lasting impact on the future.

      Apply to Host a 2011 Wow! That's Engineering! Event

      SWE sponsors three high-visibility Wow! That’s Engineering! outreach events annually, resulting in a learning experience that is fun for girls while encouraging them to consider an engineering career.

      This past March, Cleveland State University’s SWE section hosted an amazing event, and photos demonstrating the event’s success are now posted. We look forward to hosting signature events with the San Diego and Pittsburgh sections in August and September, respectively.

      November 13, 2010 is the deadline to apply for the three available 2011 signature events so apply today!

      For further assistance, contact Randy Freedman, SWE K-12 Outreach Manager at 312.596.5232.

      SWE Corporate Members

      The Power of Diversity

      Diversity in the workforce and in leadership has been correlated to improved performance results for organizations. SWE promotes diversity of gender, ethnicity, and thought in all of its programs targeting K-12 students through executive-level professionals. Through SWE membership, organizations can support their community outreach efforts, satisfy their recruitment and retention goals, and take advantage of a platform by which to support and recognize their women engineers.

      Benefits of a Corporate Membership:

      • Support the retention and advancement of women engineers in your organization.
      • Showcase your organization as a diversity advocate.
      • Join SWE in the pursuit of its mission.

      Corporate Membership Includes:

      •  Nine individual SWE memberships for employees.
      • Three registrations to the SWE National Conference held each fall for three of the employees you nominate for membership.
      •  SWE national awards information and authorization for corporate contact to "sign" nomination packages for employees as an alternative to a SWE section officer.
      •  A complimentary subscription to the award-winning SWE Magazine addressed to SWE's corporate contact.
      •  Visibility as a Corporate Member of SWE, including listing on SWE's website, in the annual conference issue of SWE Magazine and in SWE's annual report.
      •  One free 60-day online job posting (valued at $250.00) on SWE's Career Center.

      Read more about benefits.


      Cost

      The cost for Corporate Membership is $3,000 per year.

      To find out more about Corporate Membership at SWE contact Mary Carravallah at 312.596.5257 or email corporatemembership@swe.org


      Links: 

      Corporate Brochure 

      SWE Corporate Members

      Apply to Host a Wow! That's Engineering! Event in 2010

      SWE sponsors three high-visibility Wow! That's Engineering! outreach events each year. These events provide a fun learning experience that encourages girls to consider engineering careers.

      In May of 2009 SWE Boston hosted an amazing event that brought out 150 girls and 40 volunteers. Recently, the North Alabama section held a successful event on September 19 that drew more than 200 girls who traveled near and far to attend. The last scheduled Wow! event for this year will be in Los Angeles on November 7.

      Apply for your section to host a Wow! That’s Engineering! event in 2010. For further assistance, please contact Randy Freedman, SWE K-12 Outreach Manager at 312.596.5232.

      Annual Conference Sponsorship

      SWE offers many ways for your organization to commemorate outstanding achievement and to support women in engineering and technology. For more information on the awards sponsorships, listed below, please contact Karen Horting at 312.596.5223 or funddevelopment@swe.org.

      Individual Professional Award Sponsorship
      Your company is invited to help celebrate the achievements of women engineers by sponsoring an Individual Professional Award. 

      Collegiate Award Sponsorship
      Your company is invited to support the next generation of women engineers by sponsoring a Collegiate Award.

      Outreach Sponsorship
      Each year the Outreach Committee receives sponsorship from corporations to support awards for outstanding career guidance programs for collegiate and professional member sections. It is evident that there are many strong sections that dedicate their time and resources to educate students, parents, counselors, teachers, and the community about the opportunities available for women in engineering. These awards are intended to praise these efforts, and to provide funding for further career guidance programs.

       

      SWE Resources

      For members to access SWE Resources, please log in to SWE.org (at the top of the page).  A link to the SWE Resources will then display under the Membership Tab and in the footer.  For posting to SWE's Resources, please send documents here. SWE will post within one business day. 

      Have a suggestion for the leadership or staff of SWE?, send it to us.

      Membership@swe.org can help with logins, profile access, and renewal and joining processes.

      If you have an issue that has not been resolved through these systems, please contact SWE’s ombudsman.

      Sections | Regions | MAL | International

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      Baltimore/Washington (Region E)

      Baton Rouge (Region C)

      Baylor University (Region C)

      Binghamton University (Region E)

      Birmingham (Region D)

      BOD - Tiefenbach

      Karolyn Tiefenbach

      Special Director - Strategic Initiatives, FY2009

      As an automotive executive, Karolyn Tiefenbach began her career as a union designer while attending school to obtain her engineering degree. Over 16 years in night school, she earned four degrees: an associate in architectural design; a BSME; an executive MBA from Michigan State University; and a master’s in liberal studies, focusing on philosophy and world history.

      Her 30-year career with Chrysler Motors included assignments in engineering, finance, manufacturing support, international, and vehicle and component testing. Tiefenbach’s assignments continued to grow in responsibility and size. While at Beijing Jeep in Beijing, China, she instituted an on-site, hands-on training program to broaden the engineering staff’s technical skills. During her assignment at Toledo Assembly Plant in Toledo, Ohio, she hired a team of engineers to reduce warranty and be the on-site engineering support needed to meet aggressive quality improvements. During her most recent assignment, her staff of 250 people, in four locations and three shifts, supported all of Chrysler’s 52 diverse laboratories with preventative maintenance, computer simulations tools, and computer-driven technology support.

      Having worked for 37 years, Tiefenbach is currently pursuing her interests in community support with the Girls Group of Ann Arbor, while obtaining her certification to teach yoga.



      karolyn.tiefenbach@swe.org

      Membership Main

      Membership

      When you join SWE you become a part of an elite group of women engineers and technologists. Running just as deep as the camaraderie we share, are the opportunities and resources that come along with membership. SWE is the Society for women who want to advance the field of engineering and excel professionally. If you are not a member yet, you don’t want to miss out on this incredibly rewarding opportunity. Join SWE today!

      Already a SWE member? Visit SWE’s Online Member Services Center to manage all of your member activity, including membership renewal, address and profile updates. The Center is also the place to access the SWE Online Directory, upgrade your membership, enter discussion forums and much more!

       

      Aspire, Advance, Achieve

      Professional Development Main

      Professional Development

      Professional Development at SWE has a focused approach to empower women to succeed and advance in their engineering studies and careers. Our programs support the retention, recruitment and advancement of women in engineering and technology through career services, professional development programs and networking opportunities.

       

      Formal Training, Networking and Mentoring, Leadership Opportunities

      Webinars: Emotional Intelligence

      Emotional Intelligence Series

      Click here to listen to these webinars.

      Part 1

      During part one of this series you will be introduced to some of the underlying definitions of emotional intelligence (EQ). There will be discussion on what it is and why it matters. There will be additional focus on processing feedback, an assessment tool for general moods (happiness and optimism), intrapersonal assessment tools, the intersection of development strategies and diversity issues, and identify your emotional intelligence challenges.

      This webinar was generously sponsored by Bank of America.

       

      Part 2: Can't We All Just Get Along?

      Emotional intelligence is defined as the skills, behavior and ability that allow one to productively manage self and others in the diverse environment in which we work and live.  In Part Two of this three part series, we will continue our exploration of emotional intelligence skills, focusing on adaptability and stress management.  You will learn development strategies that will help you leverage your emotional intelligence for enhanced problem solving and conflict resolution.

      Part 3

      In this final Webinar of our three part series on emotional intelligence, we will explore the final component, intrapersonal skills. Individuals who are capable in this area are in touch with their emotions, feel good about themselves and feel positive about how they live their lives. Strong intrapersonal skills translate into the ability to navigate within a diverse work environment. We will wrap up the presentation with concrete ideas on incorporating emotional intelligence competencies into your ongoing career development plans.

      This webinar was generously sponsored by Medtronic.

       

      About the Presenter:

      PamFayMBAPresident and founder of Three Basic Consulting, Pamela Fay began her professional career as a management consultant nearly fifteen years ago. Earning her MBA from Dartmouth College (Amos Tuck), Ms. Fay has a rich and varied background, offering proven results to her clients in the area of leadership effectiveness, diversity and inclusion and change management.  Ms. Fay is qualified to administer a number of psychometric assessments, including Myers-Briggs and BarOn emotional intelligence instruments, and uses these tools to build leadership programs for executives and next generation leaders, as well as women and minorities.  Currently, Ms. Fay concentrates her practice on professional service firms, including many AmLaw 200 firms.  Over the years, she has consulted to a number of Fortune 500 companies, as well as emerging and entrepreneurial businesses.

       


       

      Public Policy Activities

      SWE Public Policy Activities

      Educational Efforts 
      September 15th: The National Science Board (NSB) released a new report, “Preparing the Next Generation of STEM Innovators: Identifying and Developing Our Nation’s Human Capital,” which was the culmination of the NSB STEM Innovators project, a two-year effort that explored “ways that the country can foster the development of our next generation of leading STEM professionals, entrepreneurs, and inventors.” Staff attended the report’s release at the National Press Club. 
      September 16th: As part of his “Educate to Innovate” campaign to raise American students to the top of the pack in science and mathematics achievement over the next decade, President Obama announced the launch of “Change the Equation,” a CEO-led effort to dramatically improve education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Earlier that day, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) also released its long-awaited STEM study entitled, “Prepare and Inspire: K-12 Education in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) for America’s Future.” 
      September 23rd: The National Academy and Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine released a follow-up to the Rising Above the Gathering Storm report entitled, “Rising Above the Gathering Storm, Revisited: Rapidly Approaching Category 5,” which examines the progress or lack thereof being made by the United States in confronting challenges in global competitiveness. Staff was in attendance for the report’s release. 
      October 18, 2010: President Obama hosted the first-ever White House science fair, celebrating the winners of a broad range of STEM competitions, including FIRST Robotics, EWeek Future City, and the JETS TEAMS competition. Staff represented SWE at this event. 

      March 24-25, 2010: SWE organized the 2010 "Diversity and Inclusion Fuels Innovation in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)" Capitol Hill Day. While SWE has co-sponsored other Capitol Hill Days in previous years, this was the first one in which SWE took the lead in organizing, and the first to be solely focused on issues related to diversity and STEM.  Eleven SWE leaders were in attendance at the Capitol Hill Day, and nine of those members participated in Congressional visits.

       

      The 2010 Capitol Hill Day events consisted of training for participants and a Capitol Hill reception on March 24, followed by a Capitol Hill breakfast and Congressional visits on March 25. Speakers at the training who provided attendees with insight into current policy issues related to diversity in STEM included Jacqueline Michaels from the Department of Education Office of Civil Rights; Dr. Kelly Mack, Program Director for ADVANCE at the National Science Foundation, and Dr. Arundhati Jayarao, Congressional Fellow in Senator Kirsten Gillibrand’s (D-NY) office. 

       

      During the March 24 reception, SWE presented its 2010 President’s Award to Ms. Brenda Manuel, NASA Associate Administrator of Diversity and Equal Opportunity, in recognition of her outstanding contributions to promoting diversity and inclusion in the STEM fields through her (and her team’s) recent work related to Title IX and STEM. NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, Jr. was in attendance during the reception, and helped SWE present the award.  SWE also presented a SWE Certificate of Appreciation to Representative Vernon Ehlers (R-MI), who will be retiring after this term of office and who has been a longtime champion of the need to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in America’s schools. In addition to Representatives Vernon Ehlers (R-MI), Representatives Marcia Fudge (D-OH), and Paul Tonko (D-NY) also provided remarks at the event. 

       

      On March 25, Dr. John Veysey, Senior Legislative Assistant from Representative Daniel Lipinski (D-IL)’s office, served as the breakfast keynote speaker. A Ph.D. by training, Dr. Veysey provided attendees with some tips on how to talk to Congressional staff, and more insight into the workings of a Congressional office. After the breakfast, Congressional visits were scheduled for attendees with their Congressional representatives.

       

       

      The following 17 STEM and diversity organizations co-sponsored the event: American Association of University Women; AIChE- Women’s Initiative Committee, American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, American Nuclear Society, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Society for Engineering Education, ASME Center for Leadership and Diversity, Association for Women in Science, IEEE-USA, MentorNet, National Center for Women and Information Technology, National GEM Consortium, National Society of Professional Engineers, SAE International, Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, Society of Manufacturing Engineers, and Women in Engineering Pro-Active Network.

       

      For more information, please visit the SWE Public Policy Community.

       

      January 12, 2010: SWE convened a roundtable to discuss "Practical Approaches to Attracting and Retaining Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Fields." Over 40 representatives from 28 engineering and engineering-related organizations attended the roundtable. SWE President Nora Lin served as the roundtable’s moderator. Representatives from associations of science and engineering professionals, Congressional offices, federal agencies, industry and academia were in attendance. Topics of discussion included the current statistics of women in STEM in higher education; examples of what universities and professional societies are doing to address the underrepresentation of women and underrepresented groups in academia and the STEM workforce, including the NSF ADVANCE program; and an overview of the recent NASA Title IX reviews of STEM departments. For more information, please visit the SWE Public Policy Community.
      November 23, 2009: President Obama announced his new "Educate to Innovate" campaign to improve STEM education in America’s schools in late 2009. The announcement was made at the White House with the leaders of the science and engineering community in attendance, including SWE President Nora Lin. SWE is supportive of this campaign and will be participating in two of the campaign’s signature events: National Lab Day and National STEM week. The first of the two, National Lab Day, focuses matching scientists and engineers with local classroom teachers to help with specific resources and activities. National Lab Day has developed a beta website for this initiative, and SWE’s specific web link on the site is http://www.nationallabday.org/groups/swe. For more information about the "Educate to Innovate" initiative, please visit http://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/education/educate-innovate
      November 10, 2009: The National Coalition of Women and Girls in Education (NCWGE) held a Congressional briefing entitled, "STEM Education: How Gender Bias Hurts Girls, Boys and U.S. Competitiveness." GRPP Chair, Cathy Pieronek, was one of the briefing’s primary speakers, and gave a talk entitled, "Women and STEM: The Need for Change." To view the video of Cathy’s presentation, please visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYLRIrdwJf4
      July 21, 2009: The House Committee on Science and Technology Subcommittee on Research and Science Education held a hearing entitled, "Encouraging the Participation of Women in STEM Fields." Ms. Barbara Bogue, Co-Founder and Co-Director of the SWE Assessing Women and Men in Engineering (AWE) Project, testified on behalf of SWE. Ms. Bogue provided an overview of the SWE AWE project, including the metrics and methodologies used to assess and evaluate the effectiveness of programs designed to increase girls participation in STEM, and also spoke about her experiences as head of the Women in Engineering program at Pennsylvania State University. More information about the hearing can be found here.
      June 23, 2009: Betty Shanahan, SWE Executive Director and CEO, attended a White House roundtable commemorating the 37th anniversary of Title IX. Speakers included: Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett, Education Secretary Arne Duncan, and an all-star line-up of women athletes and scientists, including Billie Jean King and Dominique Dawes. In addition to the roundtable participants, 30 local high school girls were in the audience.  The White House YouTube video of the roundtable can be found here.
      May 20, 2009: SWE co-sponsored a briefing entitled, "Bringing Innovative Computing Curricula Across the Digital Divide."  The primary sponsor was the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM), and the other co-sponsors included: Microsoft, the Computing Research Association, Computer Science Teachers Association, IEEE-USA, and the National Center for Women and Information Technology.  The briefing was held in conjunction with the House STEM Education Caucus and the Congressional Black Caucus, and approximately 70 people attended the event, including key Congressional staff.  More information about the briefing can be found here.
      April 28-29, 2009: Eleven SWE leaders participated in the 2009 Science Engineering and Technology Congressional Visits Day (CVD), which SWE co-sponsored.  Twenty-one Congressional visits were conducted with the leaders' local Members of Congress (House and Senate) and/or their staff.  In addition, SWE President Virginia Connolly, P.E. was one of the principals who participated in a CVD press conference with the Congressional Research and Development Caucus Co-Chairs.  As the only diversity group co-sponsoring CVD, the focus of SWE President Connolly's message was the need for U.S. commitment to a more diverse and inclusive U.S. workforce, which can help fuel innovation.  More information about SWE's participation in CVD 2009 can be found in the June 2009 Washington Spotlight and in the SWE Public Policy Community.
      February 24, 2009: SWE held a Congressional briefing in conjunction with the House Diversity and Innovation Caucus entitled, "The Dearth of Women in Academic Science and Engineering: Proactive Strategies for Improvement."  More than 100 representatives from Congressional offices, federal agencies, nongovernmental organizations, industry, and academia attended the event, and SWE President Virginia Connolly, P.E. served as moderator.  More information about the briefing can be found here.
      November 7, 2008: During WE08, the SWE Government Relations and Public Policy (GRPP) Committee held a breakout session entitled, “SWE Public Policy and You: How to Communicate with Congress.”  The session discussed SWE’s current public policy goals and activities, and how individual SWE members can get involved.  Then the session provided attendees with an overview of how to communicate with Congress and discussed other opportunities in Washington, D.C.  More information, including speaker presentations, can be found on the SWE Public Policy Community.
      September 18, 2008: Patricia Eng, P.E., member of the SWE Government Relations and Public Policy Committee, testified before the National Academies’ Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine (CWSEM) during their “From Doctorate to Dean or Director: Sustaining Women through Critical Transition Points in Science, Engineering, and Medicine.”  SWE’s testimony focused primarily on the major finding of the SWE retention study, which dealt with STEM industry retention for women.  Ms. Eng’s testimony can be found in the SWE Public Policy Community.
      August 29, 2008: A joint AWIS-SWE letter was sent to the two Presidential candidates, Senators Barack Obama (D-IL) and John McCain (R-AZ), which asked the candidates seven specific questions on their views on issues related to women in science and engineering.  Both candidates have recently responded.  View a side-by-side comparison of their responses.
      July 23, 2008: SWE hosted an evening reception in honor of the House Diversity and Innovation (D&I) Caucus, recognizing their efforts over the past year.  At this reception, SWE presented its first-ever President’s award to Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX) for her work to ensure a diverse and inclusive STEM workforce. Additional information can be found here.
      May 21, 2008: SWE FY 2008 President Michelle Tortolani spoke in support of the "Enhancing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Act of 2008" at the bill's introductory press conference held by Representative Mike Honda (D-CA). Photos from the press conference and Tortolani's remarks are now available for your review. image1; image2; Tortolani's Remarks

      February 28, 2008:  SWE responds to House Diversity and Innovation Caucus questions related to what barriers women and under-represented groups face entering the STEM workforce, what institutional policies or practices are in place that can mitigate these challenges, and what Congress and the federal government can do to promote and ensure a more favorable environment.

      October 18, 2007: SWE held a Congressional briefing in conjunction with the House Diversity and Innovation Caucus entitled, “The Leaky Science and Engineering Pipeline: How Can We Retain More Women in Academia and Industry?”  Summary of Congressional Briefing: October 18, 2007

      June 28, 2007: SWE held a Congressional Briefing entitled, “The Importance of the Diversity Issue to the Competitiveness and Innovation Debate.” The briefing was the inaugural opportunity for attendees to hear from members of the new Congressional Diversity and Innovation Caucus. Summary of Congressional Briefing: June 28, 2007

      June 19, 2007: Testimony of SWE Past President Margaret Edith Layne, P.E., to the House Education and Labor Subcommittee on Higher Education, Life Long Learning, and Competitiveness. The hearing was entitled, “Building on the Success of Thirty-Five Years of Title IX,” and Layne’s testimony discussed the relationship of Title IX, its impact in the past 35 years and the discrimination still existing in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields.

       

      Testimony of SWE Past President Peggy Layne, P.E. to House Committee on Education and Labor: June 19, 2007  

      February 28, 2007: SWE held a roundtable discussion on the topic of gender equity in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields at the National Academies. Thirty-eight representatives from twenty-two science and engineering professional organizations and women’s groups were in attendance. Roundtable Summary

      September 26, 2006: SWE held a Congressional Briefing in conjunction with both the House STEM Education Caucus and the Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues entitled, “Are More Women and Diversity Needed in the STEM Workforce?” Summary of Congressional Briefing: September 26, 2006

      February 21, 2006: During Engineers Week 2006, SWE held a Congressional Briefing in conjunction with the House STEM Education Caucus entitled, “ Strengthening the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Workforce: Connecting Educators to Engineering”  Summary of Congressional Briefing: February 21, 2006

       

      PD- Learning Resources

      Professional Development Learning Resources

      SWE offers a variety of resources to help you grow professionally and personally. Stay up-to-date with professional development news, read white papers on important industry topics, access our Career Toolbox to enhance or advance your career and get tips and advice for achieving successful work-life balance.

      Scholarship - Freshmen TEST PAGE

      Freshman Scholarships


      The deadline to apply for Freshman scholarships for the 2008-2009 school year has passed.  Recipients will be notified in August.

      Questions regarding scholarships can be sent to scholarshipapplication@swe.org.


      The Anne Maureen Whitney Barrow Memorial Scholarship
      Amount
      Class Majors
      Other
      1 @ $5,000^3 Renewable 4 yr. max. All classes
      All engineering
      Awarded only once per renewal cycle

      The BK Krenzer Memorial Reentry Scholarship

      Amount
      Class
      Majors
      Other
      1 @ $2,000 All classes plus graduate level All engineering  
      The Bertha Lamme Memorial Scholarship
      Amount
      Class
      Majors
       Other
      1 @ $1,200 Freshman EE U.S. citizenship required.

      For the SWE scholarship brochure, click here.

      Profiles of SWE Pioneers

      Profiles of SWE Pioneers: An Oral History Project

      Documenting the lives of pioneering women engineers, these interviews capture individual experiences within various engineering disciplines across the United States. Each personal story is unique, yet collectively they illustrate the significant achievement made by women who began their engineering careers in the 1940s, '50s, and '60s. These oral histories offer a glimpse into the private and professional lives of women engineers as well as the founding and development of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE).

      Interviews include several "women firsts" and provide first-hand accounts and personal perspectives on the development and culture of their fields, and their impact on the history of women and engineering. They address a range of questions related to women in non-traditional professions during the last 50-75 years.

      Links to biographical sketches, full transcripts, and video clips from interviews with more than thirty pioneering women engineers are available below, arranged by name, engineering discipline, and interview topics. Please read our Terms of Use before viewing.

      Copies of the full-length oral histories are available through the SWE Archives.

      Engineering Pioneers

      Betty Lou Bailey
      Eleanor Baum
      Lois Bey
      Yvonne Brill
      Patricia Brown

      Yvonne Clark
      Lois Cooper
      Stella Lawrence Daniels
      Bonnie J. Dunbar
      Margaret Eller
      Thelma Estrin
      Ann Fletcher

      Evelyn Fowler
      Isabelle French
      Ruth Gordon
      Lois Graham
      Arminta Harness

      Ivy Hooks
      F. Suzanne Jenniches
      Barbara Crawford Johnson
      Margaret Kipilo
      Anna Kazanjian Longobardo
      Alva Matthews
      Naomi McAfee

      Mary McCarthy
      Dorothy Morris

      Maryly Van Leer Peck

      Irene Peden
      Carolyn Phillips
      Elaine Pitts
      Elizabeth Plunkett
      Betty Preece
      Gloria Brooks Reinish
      Irene Sharpe
      Margaret Taber
      Josephine Webb

       

      Profiles by Engineering Discipline

      Aeronautical & Aerospace
      Engineers/Astronauts

      Yvonne Brill
      Bonnie J. Dunbar
      Arminta Harness
      Ivy Hooks
      Barbara Crawford Johnson 
      Elizabeth Plunkett

      Biomedical Engineers
      Thelma Estrin
      Gloria Brooks Reinish

      Ceramic Engineers

      Bonnie J. Dunbar

      Chemical Engineers
      Lois Bey
      Yvonne Brill
      Patricia Brown
      Evelyn Fowler
      Maryly Van Leer Peck

      Electrical Engineers
      Eleanor Baum
      Stella Lawrence Daniels 
      Margaret Kipilo
      Mary McCarthy
      Dorothy Morris
      Irene Peden
      Betty Preece
      Gloria Brooks Reinish
      Irene Sharp
      Margaret Taber
      Josephine Webb

      Engineering Educators
      Eleanor Baum
      Yvonne Clark
      Stella Lawrence Daniels
      Margaret Eller
      Thelma Estrin
      Lois Graham
      Alva Matthews
      Maryly Van Leer Peck
      Irene Peden
      Betty Preece
      Gloria Brooks Reinish
      Margaret Taber
      Engineering Illustrators
      Margaret Eller
      Ann Fletcher

      Environmental Engineers
      F. Suzanne Jenniches
      Carolyn Phillips
      (Environmental/Industrial
       Hygiene)

      Mechanical Engineers
      Betty Lou Bailey
      Yvonne Clark
      Bonnie J. Dunbar
      (Mechanical/Biomedical)
      Lois Graham
      Anna Kazanjian Longobardo
      Alva Matthews
      (Mechanical/Structural/Civil)

      Packaging Engineers
      Elaine Pitts

      Reliability Engineers
      Naomi McAfee

      Structural Engineers
      Ruth Gordon

      Technical Editors
      Isabelle French

      Transportation Engineers
      Lois Cooper

       

      Archives Terms of Use

      Terms of Use

      All content on this web site, including photographs, video clips, oral history transcripts, biographical information, and publications have been selected from material in the Archives and are intended for noncommercial educational and personal use only.  Copyright restrictions apply.  Commercial publication, redistribution, or use of the web site content is not permitted.

      Anyone wishing to use the text, image, and video files on this web site for publication, commercial use, or any other use not expressly permitted, must contact the SWE Archives.

      Society of Women Engineers Archives
      Walter P. Reuther Library
      Wayne State University
      5401 Cass Ave.
      Detroit, MI 48202
      313.577.2863
      swearchives@wayne.edu

      Archives Storycorps

      StoryCorps© Door-to-Door Project

      At the WE07 national conference in Nashville, SWE partnered with StoryCorps© as part of a four year initiative to preserve the history of individual sections and members and to celebrate the grassroots nature of SWE.  Relatives, colleagues, and friends interviewed eight participants about their experiences as women engineers in the classroom, in the workplace, and at home.

      Believing everyone has a story to tell, StoryCorps© was developed as a large-scale initiative to capture the experiences and wisdom of everyday Americans from all segments of society.  The eight interviews recorded at the WE07 national conference will join more than 20,000 others which StoryCorps© has recorded in 48 states since 2003.   The recordings have been archived at the Library of Congress American Folklife Center and in the SWE Archives at the Walter P. Reuther Library, Wayne State University.  Audio clip from the interviews will be posted shortly.

      StoryCorps© will return to the WE08 national conference in Baltimore November 7, 2008.  Additional information will be posted as it is made available.  For more information contact the SWE Archivist at swearchives@wayne.edu .

       

      Archives Storycorps - Working

      SWE Oral History Interviews

      Women engineers are innovators and educators, participating in a profession that has shaped the development of American technology. They have made significant contributions to the world of engineering, impacted our daily lives, and inspired generations to achieve. The story of SWE is in large part the collective legacies of these women's individual accomplishments and successes. More than 70 of these distinguished women have shared their experiences regarding SWE, their education, careers, and work/life balance in SWE’s oral history interviews. For more information about SWE’s oral history interviews, contact the SWE archivist at 313.577.2863 or swearchives@wayne.edu.

      WE08 Interviewees

       bierman Elizabeth Bierman and Allison Pedersen
      SWE Leaders
       tietjen Jill Tietjen, Sandra Scanlon and Kristy Schloss
      SWE Leaders and Entrepreneurs
       delvecchio Margo Bubb and Stacey DelVecchio
      Co-workers and SWE Leaders
        Mary Anderson-Rowland and Troy Eller
      University Professor and SWE Archivist
       weisman Renee Weisman, Marge Inden and Bernice Brody
      SWE leaders 
       

      Ledo and Anne Lucietto
      Father and daughter whose interview was
      featured on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition in 2008.

      WE07 Interviewees

       Lucietto Anne Lucietto and Diane Peters
      SWE Leaders
       Osborn Fran Scholl and Aubree Osborn
      Co-workers
       Grubbe James Porter and Deborah Grubbe
      Spouses
       Hickel Maggie Hickel and Katie Peterson
      Mother and Daughter
       Law Patricia and Christine Law
      Mother and Daughter
       Layne Peggy Layne and Gail Mattson
      SWE Past Presidents
      Gaylard Phyllis Gaylard and Pamela Strong
      SWE Fellows and Award Recipients
       Clark Yvonne Clark and Carol Lawson
      Mother and Daughter
      Terms of Use

      These oral history interviews were recorded as part of StoryCorps, a nationwide initiative of Sound Portrait Productions to record and collect oral history interviews. Excperts were selected and produced by the SWE Archivist. Audio excerpts may be used for research and educational purposes only.

      Delaware

       


      DelMar Peninsula Section Scholarship for entering freshman students
       

      Contact:
      Lynn Srivastava, P.E.
      SWE Scholarship Chair
      SWE Delmar Peninsula Section
      Email: lynn.srivastava@pepcoholdings.com

       

      Requirements: 
      The SWE DelMar Section has at least five scholarships available for a minimum amount of $1,000 each. To qualify, the applicant must be a female high school senior who is entering college as a freshman and intending to study engineering, engineering technology or a field related to engineering, including scientific disciplines. The applicant must have a GPA of 3.0/40 or better.

       

      She must also have minimum SAT scores of:

       

      Math: 600, Verbal: 500, Writing: 500

       

      and minimum ACT scores of:

       

      Math: 29, English: 25

       

      Applicant does not need to attend a Delaware or Maryland university but must attend an
      engineering program at a university/college that has been accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET-EAC). An applicant may be disqualified if the school is not ABET-EAC accreditated.

       

      Assemble the Application in the following order:
      (do NOT use a report binder)

       

      1. Application

       

      2. Teacher Recomendation (at least two)

       

      3. Employer Recomendation (optional) 

       

      4. Essay (maximum 500 words)

       

      The essay should discuss your interest in engineering, your major area of study and area of specialization, and the occupation you propose to pursue after graduation. What are your long-term goals and how do you hope to achieve them? The essay may also include any other information that is relevant to your career plans. The essay should be a typewritten or computer printed essay of no more than 500 words, double spaced. Put your name, SS#, and major field of engineering at the top of the page.

       

      5. Official Transcripts (must be in sealed envelope)

       

      Your high school transcript should indicate your courses for the first semester of the 12th    grade.  It should also clearly indicate on the transcript all courses that are included in the high school "honors" or "advanced placement" programs, any courses completed from a college or university curriculum for which high school credit is earned; and any credits earned from a special industry program.  This information will be used to award supplemental credit to the applicant.

       

      6. SAT/ACT Scores 

       
      For More information and to download an application go to

       

      http://www.geocities.com/swedelmar/scholar 

       

      Deadline for all applicants is December 5, 2008

       

      Past Award Recipients - Counselor

      Outstanding SWE Counselor Award Recipients


       Year

      Award Recipient

       2009 Diana Madden
       2008
      Heather A. Doty
       2007   Jennifer Chen Morikawa

      For Past Recipients of other Awards, click here

       

       

      Past Award Recipients - Advisor

      Outstanding SWE Faculty Advisor Award Recipients


       Year

      Award Recipient

       2009
      Candace Sulzbach, P.E.
       2008 Beth A. Todd, Ph.D.
       2007   Catherine F. Pieronek

      For Past Recipients of other Awards, click here

       

       

      SWE Scholarship Eligibility and Requirements

      For Upperclass Students ONLY 

      • The Society of Women Engineers Scholarship is only open to women.
      • The applicant is enrolled in a baccalaureate ABET/CSAB accredited engineering or computer science degree program, or the applicant is accepted for enrollment in a baccalaureate computer science program at an ABET approved school. Please go to www.abet.org for more information.
      • The applicant is in a position to accept the scholarship in the school year for which it is being awarded.
      • The minimum GPA is 3.0/4.0 for upperclass applicants.
      • The applicant is not the current recipient of a renewable SWE Scholarship (i.e. is not already designated to receive a SWE scholarship payment in the coming academic year.) The applicant must be a full time student, except for reentry applicants.
      • The applicant must be a US citizen or permanent resident of the US for some scholarships. The applicant is not receiving full funding for education from another organization (e.g. members of the Armed Services attending US Military Academies, students receiving full reimbursement from an employer).  

      PLEASE NOTE: In order for your application to be VALID and ELIGIBLE you must do the following:

      1. Fill out the online Scholarship Application and submit the application.
      2. Send in a current official transcript from your college and from other schools where you have taken courses, if applicable. The transcript cannot be an electronic copy, and it must have a school stamp and signature.
      3. Send in two (2) letters of recommendation. One letter of reference must be from a teacher or college professor in a STEM (science, technology, engineering or mathematics) field familiar with the student's work in their respective field and/or STEM.  The other must be from a person who has known the applicant for two or more years and who is not a relative or member of the applicant’s family. For example, the second letter can be from a coach or a family friend. There is not a specific format for recommendation letters.        

      All hard copy materials must be mailed in ONE ENVELOPE OR PACKAGE postmarked by the deadline of February 2, 2009 in order for your application to be valid and eligible. Please mail all materials to:

      Scholarship Selection Committee-Upperclass
      Society of Women Engineers
      203 N La Salle Street, Suite 1675
      Chicago, IL 60601

      If you have any questions, please email scholarshipapplication@swe.org.  

      Webinars: Career Futuring

      Career Futuring Series

      Click here to listen to these webinars.

      Part 1 of Career Futuring Series: The Career Security Profile

      In the webinar Lynne shares 3 truths about career security (most people refuse to accept these and fail to act as if they are true!), and provides 3 tools to become more “psychologically self-employed,” no matter who’s signing your paycheck. We’ll introduce you to all 5 strategies for creating more career security – no matter what happens to your job. We’ll show you how to change the way you think about your relationship with your employer and how to make career futuring a # 1 priority.

      Part 2 of Career Futuring Series: Career Risk Assessment

      During the webinar Lynne gives you strategies for identifying “adjacent” careers that you could move to if your's disappears, 20 ways to go beside up, a template for deciding what to learn next to keep your skills market ready, ways to fit learning into your already busy life, tips for getting a better job faster if you do get laid off, and ways to act your wage so that you’re ready to weather periods of paychecklessness.

      Part 3 of Career Futuring Series: Your Network Strategy

      During the webinar Lynne will look at the last of the 5 strategies for futurizing your career: strategic networking. Since 75-80% of all jobs are found through the people you know, the length of your job search will depend on the strength of your network. Our research shows that only 15% have the network they need to get the job done – or to get the job.  We’ll show you how to manage the 3 key moments of networking, what to do and say to advance through the stages of trust building so people want to help you, who to teach people what kinds of opportunities to send you way, and how to make the Reciprocity Principle work for you.

      This webinar iseries was generously sponsored by ALCOA.


      About the Presenter:

      LynneStarSuitLynne Waymon is the co-author of The FireProof Your Career ToolKit and a nationally known professional speaker and trainer. For 18 years she’s worked with Fortune 500 companies and major associations to help their employees and members develop and advance their careers.  She’s also the co-author of Make Your Contacts Count (AMACOM, 2007). 

      Recent clients include Heery International, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, Deloitte Financial Advisory Services,  Kraft Foods, DuPont, Corning, PricewaterhouseCoopers,  Booz-Allen Hamilton, First Horizon Bank, HSBC Bank, National Geographic Society, Marquette University, Georgetown University, the Howard County Economic Development Authority, Consumer Electronics Association, American Council of Engineering Companies, Society of  Women Engineers, American Institute of Architects, Treasury Executive Institute, U.S. Departments of State, Agriculture, Commerce, & Navy, the NIH, FDA, NASA, Presidential Fellows Program.  In 2002 Lynne received the highest award given by the National Capital Speakers Association for platform excellence.  

       

      *By registering for these webinars, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Webinars: Work/Life

      Work/Life Effectiveness Series

      Click here to listen to these webinars.

      Part 1: The Balancing Act

      Does your work (and life) feel out of control?  Do you feel burdened with too many responsibilities and not enough time for personal enjoyment?  Part one of the Work Life Effectiveness Webinar series will present practical tips on how to bring more balance into your life by determining your priorities and developing a personal action plan for success.

      This webinar was generously sponsored by Abbott

       

      Part 2: Managing Workplace Stress

      Nearly 50 percent of all U.S. workers feel overwhelmed by a growing number of job tasks and longer working hours.  High levels of stress in the workplace often lead to job burnout, resulting in lower productivity.  How can you effectively manage this stress and become more effective in today’s demanding work environment?  This Webinar addresses this question and more.

      This webinar was generously sponsored by Honeywell.

       

      Part 3: Taking Control of Your Time

      Are you feeling overwhelmed with your workload?  Do you have too much to do in too little time?  This Webinar shows you how to take control of your schedule and your time.  You will learn strategies and tips on how to deal with overload, plan and prioritize, and stay focused on your priorities.

      This webinar was generously sponsored by Abbott.

       About the Presenter:

      KathleenBartonOver twenty years ago Kathleen Barton realized her life was out of balance. She spent all her time working, going to school, and studying. She didn’t have time for her husband much less herself.  Faced with the prospect of losing her marriage, she realized she had totally lost sight of her priorities. That was the start of her life balance journey. 

      In the ensuing years, Kathleen worked in alternative work arrangements to bring more balance into her life. In 1987 Kathleen found a job-share partner and sold the concept to her boss. She worked in the job-share while she completed her MBA.  After her first child was born, Kathleen went back to work full-time while her husband, "Mr. Mom" as he called himself, stayed home with their daughter. When their second child was born, Kathleen took six months maternity leave, and then went back to work part-time. Today Kathleen has teenage kids, and runs her own business from a home office. She often refers to herself as a "reformed workaholic."   

      Kathleen has presented to a variety of audiences, including professional women’s associations, high technology and healthcare. Key clients include Hewlett-Packard Company, M&M/Mars, Nationwide Insurance, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Society of Women Engineers and Veterans Healthcare Administration, among others. Kathleen’s dynamic and interactive programs will inspire your audience to achieve better life balance.

      Kathleen is the author of Connecting with Success, Finding Your Purpose and Passion in Life, and The Balancing Act: Managing Work & Life audio/workbook. Kathleen’s work has been featured in a variety of publications including The Executive, Real Life Healthcare, and The Wall Street Journal Online.

      *By registering for any of these webinars, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Webinars: Managing Your Workload

      Managing Your Workload: How to Set Limits and Say "No"

      Kathleen Barton will discuss how to set limits and say “no” in order to focus on your most important work priorities. You will learn how to: prioritize your most important projects; determine what you can realistically accomplish; say “no” to yourself; say “no” to others–diplomatically and tactfully; break out of the “people pleaser” trap; and negotiate the scope or deadline of projects.

      This webinar was held September 25, 2007. This webinar was generously sponsored by BAE SYSTEMS.

      Temporarily Offline.

      About the Presenter:

      KathleenBartonOver twenty years ago Kathleen Barton realized her life was out of balance. She spent all her time working, going to school, and studying. She didn’t have time for her husband much less herself.  Faced with the prospect of losing her marriage, she realized she had totally lost sight of her priorities. That was the start of her life balance journey. 

      In the ensuing years, Kathleen worked in alternative work arrangements to bring more balance into her life. In 1987 Kathleen found a job-share partner and sold the concept to her boss. She worked in the job-share while she completed her MBA.  After her first child was born, Kathleen went back to work full-time while her husband, "Mr. Mom" as he called himself, stayed home with their daughter. When their second child was born, Kathleen took six months maternity leave, and then went back to work part-time. Today Kathleen has teenage kids, and runs her own business from a home office. She often refers to herself as a "reformed workaholic."   

      Kathleen has presented to a variety of audiences, including professional women’s associations, high technology and healthcare. Key clients include Hewlett-Packard Company, M&M/Mars, Nationwide Insurance, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Society of Women Engineers and Veterans Healthcare Administration, among others. Kathleen’s dynamic and interactive programs will inspire your audience to achieve better life balance.

      Kathleen is the author of Connecting with Success, Finding Your Purpose and Passion in Life, and The Balancing Act: Managing Work & Life audio/workbook. Kathleen’s work has been featured in a variety of publications including The Executive, Real Life Healthcare, and The Wall Street Journal Online.

      SWE Logos

      SWE Logos

      To download SWE Logos, please visit the Communications Resources Community on My SWE Communities.

      Webinars: Engineers Week

      Engineers Week Webinar: SASS-E Girlz

      This webinar introduces a new lesson plan package, SASS-E Girlz, that is designed to encourage girls to consider a career in engineering. SASS-E Girlz is a comprehensive career awareness program that SWE members can implement in conjunction with middle school counselors that focuses on girls developing the Skills, Attitude, Science, and Smarts for Engineering!

      Through the development of school and community partnerships, SWE members and school counselors have an opportunity to foster girls' interest in math and science, and ultimately, impact the career decision making of female students.  Dr. Lisa Hinkelman will discuss the critical issues that impact girls' career development and will train participants on how to effectively implement the new SASS-E Girlz lesson plan package. Specifically, SWE members will learn how to reach out to their local schools and collaborate with school counselors to implement SASS-E Girlz. The SASS-E Girlz program is generously funded by the Dorothy M. and Earl S. Hoffman Trust.

       

      News Release 08 - Craig

      Carol Craig Receives 2008 Society of Women Engineers Entrepreneur Award        

      Craig recognized at WE08, the Society of Women Engineers national conference.


      Chicago, IL November 10, 2008 – The Society of Women Engineers (SWE) is pleased to announce Carol Craig as the recipient of the 2008 Entrepreneur Award for building a successful small business with a large business infrastructure based upon entrepreneurial spirit, personal integrity, and commitment to clients and employees.

      “Carol Craig epitomizes a successful business woman and engineer. She has built a company from the ground up, starting as a single consultant and growing her business to include 150 employees nationwide. Her outstanding determination and business acumen can be exemplified by her numerous recognitions,” said Virginia Connolly, SWE President.

      Craig is the founder and owner of Craig Technologies, Inc., a provider of information technology solutions for commercial and government entities. The company provides executive oversight and professional engineering services to give clients superior, cost-effective solutions and answers to the technological demands of the aerospace, defense and Government operation.

      Craig Technologies was recognized as ITFlorida’s 2007 “High Growth Company of the Year.” It was also twice recognized as one of Hampton Roads’ top 25 rising companies. Craig Technologies, Inc. has had a 300 percent gain in revenue per year since 2003, with a total estimate contract value of $50 million to date.

      As an employer, Craig offers a working environment that promotes employee well-being and success. She does this by supporting the professional and personal growth of her employees through such activities as training and continuing education. Her extraordinary attention to employee well-being has resulted in a 92 percent retention rate.   

      “As an entrepreneur and successful woman engineer, Carol Craig demonstrates the qualities of a well-rounded and intelligent person of great potential.  Starting a multi-million dollar technical firm from her home office, Carol possesses the highest-degree of focus and forward-thinking in managing a nationwide company. She truly epitomizes work/life balance: Carol is true leader in the business of technology, but she also balances family life and lends support to the betterment of her community,” said Kathy Whitcomb, Publicity Chair of the SWE Space Coast section.

      Prior to being an entrepreneur, Craig served active duty as a Navy P-3C Orion aviator and specialized in Surface and Substance Warfare. She has in-depth knowledge of military IT security resulting from her tenure as the Automated Security Information Security Manager for the Strike Fighter Weapons School, Pacific in Lemoore, Calif.

      Craig holds a B.A. in computer science from Knox College, a B.S. in computer engineering from the University of Illinois and a M.S. in electrical computer engineering from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in electrical computer engineering at the Florida Institute of Technology.

      The SWE Entrepreneur Award honors a SWE member who starts and/or maintains her own engineering, scientific, or technology-based business. The recipient is skilled in technical, business planning, administrative, and financial techniques and excels in business leadership; and is a role model for those who have risked financial security for the possibility of uncertain rewards.

      The Entrepreneur Award was presented on Nov.7 at WE08, the Society of Women Engineers national conference. WE08 was held at the Baltimore Convention Center, Nov. 6-8, in Baltimore, Md. The more than 5,000 attendees included professionals from every discipline of the engineering profession and engineering students and educators. The WE09 conference is scheduled for Oct. 15-17, 2009 in Long Beach, Calif.

       

      About SWE

      The Society of Women Engineers (SWE), founded in 1950, is a not-for-profit educational and service organization. SWE is the driving force that establishes engineering as a highly desirable career aspiration for women. SWE empowers women to succeed and advance in those aspirations and receive the recognition and credit for their life-changing contributions and achievements as engineers and leaders. For more information about the Society please visit www.swe.org or call (312) 596-5223.

       

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      News Release 08 - Morse

      Terri F. Morse Receives the Society of Women Engineers Distinguished Service Award        

      Morse recognized at WE08, the Society of Women Engineers national conference.

      Chicago, IL November 10, 2008 – The Society of Women Engineers (SWE) is pleased to announce Terri Morse a recipient of the 2008 Distinguished Service Award for dedication to the Society of Women Engineers’ mission, supporting it externally and internally, at all levels of the organization, while fostering the growth and vitality of the sections and regions.

      “Sixteen years ago Terri founded Team Tech—an engineering design competition for SWE sections around the country. As a result of her leadership and vision, more than 500 collegiates from more than 35 universities have gained valuable engineering experience and leadership skills,” said Virginia Connolly, SWE President.

      Morse is director for engineering, operations & technology technical excellence at the Boeing Company. She is responsible for defining and overseeing strategy and investment levels for the company with external technical affiliation programs providing strategy, guidance and processes connecting Boeing Business Unit activities. Morse recently led the engineering design for the Phantom Works Lean & Efficient Thrust.

      Morse joined Boeing 28 years ago when she began her career in aerodynamics. Over the years, she has held various engineering and management positions developing flight controls, autopilot/auto throttle and more. Morse has also been a part of the original design teams for airplanes such as the 747-400 and the 787.

      Morse is a Life Member of SWE and has held various positions on the section, region and national levels. She co-chaired the SWE 1996 National Conference and served as SWE national bylaws chair. She is currently the national leadership coach where she serves as a professional section resource for training and consulting. Morse has also been involved with the establishment of the SWE Corporate Partners Council and the Emerging Leaders Awards. Morse received the Hewlett-Packard Innovation Award for creating Team Tech, the SWE national student section competition sponsored by Boeing.

      “Terri has been a consistent and valuable contributor to SWE at the local, regional and national levels for many years.  Her work with the Team Tech National Collegiate Competition and national leadership coaching is extremely valuable to the society,” said Tamaira Ross, SWE Pacific Northwest Section President.

      Morse graduated Summa Cum Laude from Central Washington State University.

      The Distinguished Service Award recognizes a SWE member, affiliate or associate who has made a significant contribution to the Society of Women Engineers (SWE), especially at the local and regional levels, or on national SWE committees. The award recognizes committed service, leadership and devotion to SWE, with focus on efforts that have enabled the Society to successfully fulfill its mission.

      The 2008 Distinguished Service Award recipients were recognized Nov.8 at WE08, the Society of Women Engineers national conference.WE08 was held at the Baltimore Convention Center, Nov. 6-8, in Baltimore, Md. The more than 5,000 attendees included professionals from every discipline of the engineering profession and engineering students and educators. The WE09 conference is scheduled for Oct. 15-17, 2009 in Long Beach, Calif.

       

      About SWE


      The Society of Women Engineers (SWE), founded in 1950, is a not-for-profit educational and service organization. SWE is the driving force that establishes engineering as a highly desirable career aspiration for women. SWE empowers women to succeed and advance in those aspirations and receive the recognition and credit for their life-changing contributions and achievements as engineers and leaders. For more information about the Society please visit www.swe.org or call (312) 596-5223.

       

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      News Releases 08 - FY09 BOD

      The Society of Women Engineers Installs FY2009 Board of Directors        

      Virginia Connolly Serves as 46th President of SWE


      Chicago, IL September 2, 2008 – Virginia Connolly, P.E. was installed as the 46th President of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) at a ceremony on August 1, 2008. During the ceremony, the members of the Society’s Board of Directors and Board of Trustees for fiscal year 2009 were also formally inducted. Connolly, a Lean Sigma Master Black Belt for Medtronic, Inc., will serve as SWE president for one year (July 1, 2008 – June 30, 2009).  A SWE member for more than 20 years, Connolly has held various leadership positions within SWE including Region Director, Director of Education and, for three terms, Speaker of the Council. She was also awarded the Phoenix Section’s Outstanding Member Service Award in 1997.

      “Virginia Connolly has been a tireless champion for SWE’s new strategic plan,” said Michelle Tortolani, SWE immediate past president. “Under her leadership as president, the Society and the broader engineering profession will benefit from SWE’s achievement of the plan goals.”

      As president, Connolly’s duties and responsibilities include representing SWE to the public and presiding over all meetings of the board of directors and membership.

      “The Society’s new strategic plan has presented our new board of directors with important goals for advancing SWE and women in engineering,” said Connolly. “Our focus will be on enhancing the member experience and increasing the number of potential leaders in the pipeline; the quality of professional development programs; and the number of discussions with industry, government and academic influencers”

      At Medtronic, Connolly is a leader in medical technology, where she studies health care disparities and employee retention issues. Prior to working at Medtronic, Connolly had positions in development engineering, manufacturing and information technology in the aerospace industry. Connolly has a B.S. in mechanical engineering and a M.S. in industrial engineering from Arizona State University.

      Also serving on the Society’s FY09 Board of Directors are:

      President-Elect
      Nora Lin, manager of Supportability Engineering for Northrop Grumman Corporation

      Secretary                                                   
      Fran Stuart, partner of Stuart Technical Services

      Treasurer
      Joan Graf, IT manager for Qwest Communications

      Director of Membership Initiatives
                      
      Erin C. McGinnis, chief of staff for Commercial and Civil Satellite Programs for Boeing Space and Intelligence Systems

      Director of Education
      Siddika Demir, manager of corporate services, Six Sigma for Bechtel Corporation

      Director of External Affairs

      Melissa Tata, senior project strategy manager for Dell, Inc.

      Director of Professional Development

      Bernice Brody, executive project manager for IBM Global Services

      Director of Regions
      Alyse Stofer, principal product engineer for Transoma Medical

      Special Director of Strategic Initiatives
      Karolyn Tiefenbach, retired from Chrysler LLC

      Speaker of the Council                               
      Diana Joch, senior systems engineer for Northrop Grumman Corporation

      Executive Director and CEO
      Betty Shanahan

      Collegiate Board Representative
                      
      Brittney Elko, process engineer for The Clorox Company

       

      Serving as the Society’s FY09 Board of Trustees are:

      Chair
      Carolyn Phillips

      Secretary
      Kathryn Cunningham

      Treasurer
      Marge Inden

      Members
      Jeffrey Alan Brody
      Michele Fitzpatrick
      Angela Nickels

       

      About SWE

      The Society of Women Engineers (SWE), founded in 1950, is a not-for-profit educational and service organization. SWE is the driving force that establishes engineering as a highly desirable career aspiration for women. SWE empowers women to succeed and advance in those aspirations and receive the recognition and credit for their life-changing contributions and achievements as engineers and leaders. For more information about the Society please visit www.swe.org or call (312) 596-5223.


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      Webinars: Communication Styles

      She Said/He Said: How to Understand and Leverage Communication Style Differences   

      Participants will discover the implications of their Myers-Briggs Type on interpersonal effectiveness and uncover strategies to improve their communication skills across gender and diverse work teams.  Pam Fay will discuss why feedback matters, how to ask for and use feedback received, and how to deliver feedback that works for various people. The absence of feedback is frequently cited among the top reasons for employee disengagement and attrition. Feedback provides valuable information, reinforces positive changes and contributions, and helps professionals feel valued. We will also focus on conflict resolution using some proven communication strategies. The ability to successfully manage conflict centers around assertive communication skills, active listening and the ability to create a cooperative environment. Part 1 is generously sponsored by BAE Systems, Part 2 is generously sponsored by Boston Scientific, and Part 3 is generously sponsored by FM Global.

      Click here to listen to this webinar series.

       

      Part 1:

      What’s all the hype about type?  Have you ever wondered about the implications of personality type on how you work and communicate with others, particularly those of the opposite sex?  In a traditionally male-oriented field like engineering, it’s particularly important to understand communication style differences. During the first session, we will discuss the 16 personality types… and why they matter. This webinar was held May 7.

      Part 1 of this webinar series was generously sponsored by BAE SYSTEMS.

       

      Part 2:

      In session two of this three-part series, we will apply what we have learned about personality type to the effective use of feedback. Specifically, we will discuss how to use feedback for your own professional development, as well as how to deliver high-impact feedback to others. The ability to effectively use feedback is a critical workplace skill that provides valuable information, reinforces positive changes and contributions, and helps professionals feel valued. This webinar was held May 27.

      Part 2 of this webinar series was generously sponsored by Boston Scientific.

       

      Part 3:

      In the final workshop of the series, we will focus on conflict resolution using type based communication strategies.  The ability to successfully manage conflict centers around assertive communication skills, active listening and the ability to create a cooperative environment. This webinar was held June 9.

      Part 3 of this webinar series was generously sponsored by FM Global.

       

      About the Presenter:

      PamFayMBAPresident and founder of Three Basic Consulting, Pamela Fay began her professional career as a management consultant nearly fifteen years ago. Earning her MBA from Dartmouth College (Amos Tuck), Ms. Fay has a rich and varied background, offering proven results to her clients in the area of leadership effectiveness, diversity and inclusion and change management.  Ms. Fay is qualified to administer a number of psychometric assessments, including Myers-Briggs and BarOn emotional intelligence instruments, and uses these tools to build leadership programs for executives and next generation leaders. Currently, Ms. Fay concentrates her practice on professional service firms, including many AmLaw 200 firms.  Over the years, she has consulted to a number of Fortune 500 companies, as well as emerging and entrepreneurial businesses.

      Minimize the Pain of Change and Maximize Your Results

       Jointly produced by:
       
       swe-logo2.jpg  aichecolor_web.jpg



      About the Presenter:

      j_lamarsh.jpgJeanenne LaMarsh works in a consultative capacity with organizations committed to effective organizational change. She is internationally recognized as an expert in helping companies to implement successful change. Jeanenne works with senior management, key change agents, and people who need to change; helping them to understand change and build effective change management strategies. Jeanenne founded LaMarsh & Associates in 1979 as a firm that addresses the human factors that support successful change. While serving as both a consultant and teacher of the Managed Change™ model to LaMarsh & Associates clients, Jeanenne has certified over 700 Masters of Managed Change™ throughout the world: people in LaMarsh & Associate’ clients who can teach and consult as an extension of LaMarsh & Associates and as an internal resource to their organizations. Jeanenne’s most recent book, Surviving the Delta State, will be published in late 2009. Master Change, Maximize Success, co-authored with Rebecca Potts, is published by Chronicle in the United States and Duncan Baird in London. To date it has been translated into seven languages around the world. Her first book on change and change management, Changing the Way We Change, is published by Addison-Wesley. In addition, she has written numerous articles and book chapters and is a frequent contributor to conferences in a variety of industries.

       

      About the "Minimize the Pain of Change and Maximize Your Results" Webinar:

      Although leaders and managers often have the best intentions, they can set a change initiative up to fail without being aware of the danger signs. Jeanenne LaMarsh, CEO and Founder of LaMarsh & Associates will facilitate a dynamic and thought provoking webinar on the value of effective change management. Participants will learn how to identify sources of organizational resistance and proactively build and launch a plan for active, visible and ongoing sponsorship support before change begins to fail. This webinar is generously sponsored by Booz Allen Hamilton.

      Date:
      May 21, 2009 @ 5:00 p.m. EDT


      This Webinar is generously sponsored by

      booz.gif

      Scholarships - Iowa

      Iowa

      Quad Cities/Muscatine Scholarship

      Contact:
      Brenda Murphy
      SWE Quad Cities/Muscatine Section Scholarship Chair
      murphyb@honcompany.com
      563-272-4382

      The Quad Cities/Muscatine section is offering (1) $250 scholarship to a junior or senior female engineering student.   

      One scholarship is available annually for female, junior or senior college students attending an ABET accredited engineering school.  Applicant’s home address must be inside the SWE-Quad Cities/Muscatine section boundaries.  Applications are due May 31.
       
      For more information, please visit www.societyofwomenengineers.org/quadcities.

       




       

      Webinars: Sharpening Your Interviewing Skills

      Sharpening Your Interviewing Skills: Practical Tips for Career Fairs and Company Visits

      Jada Phillabaum prepares you to handle an interview in both informal and formal settings with company representatives. This Web seminar will discuss how to have a lively conversation at a reception, stand-out at a busy career fair, and be remembered when exchanging the right words while waiting for your latté. You will also learn how to successfully vary your interviewing style--whether seated in the oak-paneled conference room or walking through the factory floor.

      This webinar was held October 9, 2007. This webinar was generously sponsored by Abbott.

      Click here to listen to this webinar.

      About the Presenter:

      Phillabaum Jada

      Jada Phillabaum works in the Global Marketing Talent Division and recruits and supervises technical marketing representatives as they start their careers at Caterpillar Inc. She graduated from Purdue University with a degree in agriculture engineering. Jada’s problem solving skills from engineering school have assisted her work with Caterpillar dealers to develop marketing plans, launch new products, and understand customer-buying requirements for Caterpillar equipment and services.
       


       

       

      *By registering for this Webinar, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Webinars: Discover Personal Ingredients for Success

      Discover Your Personal Ingredients for Success

      Dr. Pamela McCauley-Bell discusses how collegiate students, early-career professionals, and all those aspiring for more can learn how to break out of the ordinary and be all that they dreamed and more than they ever imagined. This Web seminar will guide you through a proven step-by-step plan for success that will inspire all who have the courage to dream and to make those dreams a reality. The five steps include the following: Goal setting, Planning, Hard work, Good association and Believing in yourself.

      This webinar was held November 7, 2007. This webinar was generously sponsored by Alcoa Foundation.

      Click here to listen to this webinar.

      About the Presenter:

      Dr. McCauley-BellDr. McCauley-Bell is a nationally recognized motivational speaker, entrepreneur, educator and technologist. She is the author of Winners Don't Quit...Today They Call Me Doctor and The Winners Don't Quit Kit. Dr. McCauley-Bell is also president and owner of Tech Solutions, Inc., a small business that provides technical consulting and research services to government and private industry clients. Tech Solutions, Inc. specializes in the areas of operational test and evaluation, chem-bio defense, ergonomics, safety, artificial intelligence, human factors and simulation. Additionally, she maintains her position as a tenured associate professor of industrial engineering and management systems at the University of Central Florida.

       

       
       
       
      *By registering for this Webinar, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

       

      Webinars: Campus to Cubicle

      From Campus to Cubicle: What to Expect Your First Year on the Job

      In this webinar for our collegiate members, Connie Shoemake will discuss what to do once you've landed your dream job. She will tackle such questions such as what is the global marketplace, and how to you ensure that you are ready for it. She will provide you advice on how to make the transition to the workplace where you are expected to collaborate with individuals from different cultures and backgrounds, to cooperate with diverse personalities, to be a team player, and to work on projects with strict deadlines. Moreover, the social norms, dress, and etiquette in college will be different in the workplace, as will the time constraints placed upon you. As a new engineer, you were hired for your talents and skills. On the job you will need to utilize those skills to demonstrate your value to your coworkers, your management, and your company. This Web seminar will help make your transition from college to the workplace a smooth and successful one. 

      This webinar was held February 20, 2008. This webinar was generously sponsored by IBM Corporation.

      Temporarily offline.

      About the Presenter:

      Connie ShoemakeConnie Shoemake is Vice President of Sales for IBM’s 14-state Central Region.  Connie is responsible for sales within the public sector, specifically local/state government, K-12/Higher Education, Healthcare Payor/Providers, and Pharmaceutical clients. 

      Previously, Connie was the Director of Sales Operations. In this role, Connie was responsible for strategic and tactical enablement for the regional sales force, $8 billion in revenue and over 13,000 employees spanning the hardware, software, services business, crossing mid-market, emerging and large accounts. 

      Connie has held various executive and management positions in sales and technical development throughout her career.  She joined IBM as a software sales engineer in 1981.

      Webinars: Diverse Perspectives

      Diverse Perspectives Drive Innovation

      What drives innovation within organizations? Research shows the quality of ideas improve when participants appreciate and build on the diverse perspectives of the team. Having diverse thinking styles on your team enhances problem solving ability and ultimately results in more robust innovation.  Innovators within organizations continually realize and leverage the value of diverse thinking. 

      Mary Ellyn Vicksta, a Creative Innovation Pioneer at Kimberly-Clark, will review examples of innovation when diversity was valued, and when it was ignored, in order to highlight the role and impact of diverse thought, experiences, and skills in powering innovation.  Key questions will be discussed to help participants identify their problem solving preferences and evaluate their thinking style.  Participants will be introduced to practical tools that effectively utilize differences in thinking style and perspective.  Near the end of the webinar, each person will be able to define key milestones that will bring diverse thinking preferences into their everyday life.

      This webinar was held November 20, 2008. This webinar was generously sponsored by Kimberly-Clark.

      Click here to listen to this webinar.  

      About the Presenter: 

      me_vicksta_picMary Ellyn Vicksta is a Creative Innovation Pioneer working within Global Learning and Development for Team for Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Mary Ellyn is responsible for the creative capability within Kimberly-Clark which involves creativity training, exploring best practices in the field of creativity and innovation, and leading idea generation workshops. Within Kimberly-Clark, she has developed and run training courses in creativity, understanding diverse thinking styles, and enhancing creative facilitation skills. Additionally, she supports a wide array of advanced courses and serves as an internal consultant to the various facilitators and project teams within Kimberly-Clark providing advice on innovation, creativity, and creative problem solving. She started a creativity center within Kimberly-Clark which provides an inspiring environment for workshops and training and has compiled an extensive resource area with books and other visual materials to support creativity endeavors.

      Mary Ellyn holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin, and she is a lifelong believer that diverse thinking leads to better innovation.

      *By registering for this webinar, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Webinars: Women Leading

      Women Leading the Diversity Advantage

      Have you ever been asked to "share the woman’s point of view?" As a leader do you sometimes feel your efforts being judged as a “woman engineer” rather than as an engineer? Lenora Billings-Harris will explore ways to successfully lead without carrying the burden/responsibility of all of womankind. You will end the session with actionable tips and techniques that build upon your strengths and will enable you to experience future career successes.

      This webinar was held December 13, 2007. This webinar was generously sponsored by Abbott.

      Click here to listen to this webinar.

      About the Speaker

      Billings-HarrisLenora Billings-Harris, is an international consultant, certified speaking professional (CSP), and author of The Diversity Advantage: A Guide to Making Diversity Work. With more than 25 years of experience in the public and private sectors, Lenora has developed a unique way of presenting sensitive topics in a high-energy, thought-provoking and non-threatening way. She designs and delivers presentations and helps coordinate initiatives for Fortune 500 companies as well as professional associations and educational institutions. She also served as an adjunct professor for Arizona State University, and is currently on the adjunct faculty of the Bryan School of Business and Economics, University of North Carolina-Greensboro. Lenora has presented to audiences in South Africa, Spain, Germany, Belgium, Russia, Ukraine, Mexico, Canada, the Caribbean, Canada and the South Pacific as well as all across the United States. Lenora served as president of the National Speakers Association for 2006-2007.

      Lenora received her M.A. degree from The University of Michigan and her B.S. degree from Hampton University. 

      *By registering for this Webinar, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Webinars: Glass Ceiling

      The Glass Ceiling for Asian Women

      In this webinar, Dr. Lily Tang discusses the challenges faced by Asian women in the workforce today. Although technology and scientific industries in the private sector are among the top 10 industries employing Asian women, these are also the industries where Asian women have the lowest probability of moving from professional and technical positions into management roles. What are additive challenges for women who are Asian? What culturally based behaviors and attitudes might hold implications for personal career strategies? This webinar will highlight research on women in high tech and scientific positions and provide tips on creating a personal roadmap into the leadership pipeline. As you peer through the glass ceiling, learn what you can do to position yourself for advancement opportunities and engage the talent of others.

      This webinar was held April 29, 2008. 

      Click here to listen to this webinar.

      About the Presenter:

      Lily2Dr. Lily Tang is a consultant, educator, and coach helping organizations more deeply access diverse talent and more effectively create inclusive work environments. She is experienced in global organizational assessments and has led organizational development projects for Fortune 500 companies across four continents. She is trained in participant-centered facilitation and relationship-systems coaching. She is also engaged in the development of Web 2.0 educational platforms. 

      Formerly an assistant professor of psychology and instructor in intercultural communications, Dr. Tang is a co-active partner in the Integrative Strategies Group and an affiliate of The FutureWork Institute. She actively contributes to the work of non-profits groups including Leadership Education for Asian Pacifics, and the Anti-Defamation League. She serves on the board of directors of the Asian Women Leadership Network and the Charles B. Wang Community Health Centers of New York City.

      *By registering for this Webinar, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Webinars: MySWE

      My SWE Communities

      Maureen Mandel, an expert in helping associations and non-profits execute their online communities of interest strategies and goals, will lead a webinar on how to use MySWE Communities—the great new feature of the recently re-designed swe.org. The training session will provide an overview of the entire platform as well as a step-by-step explanation of how to use each of the modules. You’ll learn how to do everything from accessing MySWE and joining communities to sharing documents and conducting association business, and much more. You’ll also find out how to locate information that was on the previous website and moved into MySWE.

      This webinar was held July 29, 2008.

      Click here to listen to this webinar.

      *By registering for this webinar, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Webinars: Executive Coaching

      Executive Coaching: How It Can Boost Your Career

      The skills and expertise that enable a technical contributor to move ahead in her career are most often different from the skills that enable her to succeed as a leader. Michele Vitti will discuss how this critical shift involves moving from technical know-how and superior problem solving skills to using emotional intelligence competencies to work through others.  These are competencies that are best developed in an intentional way, practicing behavioral changes over time. An executive coach can provide targeted support and resources to help you develop the learning experiences you need to develop leadership proficiency.

      This webinar was held January 15, 2008. This webinar was generously sponsored by FM Global.

      Click here to listen to this webinar.

      About the Presenter:

      Vitti

      Michele Vitti, founder and principal of Sunata Consulting, has been a consultant to businesses around leadership and team development for 15 years and has many more years of experience as a coach. Michele’s expertise is in helping leaders sharpen their inner edge; that is, building their capacity to know and use their unique talents; to understand, motivate and influence others; and to navigate through organizational culture and political dynamics.

      Michele is an adjunct faculty member at Smith College Executive Education for Women, was a founding board member of the Executive Coaching Forum, and is a frequent speaker to professional groups. Michele holds an M.A. degree from Lesley University. 

       

      *By registering for this Webinar, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Webinars: Women's Way

      Women's Way of Leadership: Being a Leader and Leaving a Legacy

       

      About the Presenter:


      CCK_Color_jpgBorn and raised along the border in a small barrio in Laredo, TX, LTC Consuelo Castillo Kickbusch is all too familiar with the challenges of poverty, discrimination and illiteracy. Although she grew up without material wealth, she was taught by her immigrant parents that she was rich in culture, tradition, values and faith.

      The values she learned as a child were reinforced throughout her career in the U.S. military. During that time, she broke barriers and set records in the military where she became the highest-ranking Hispanic woman in the Combat Support Field of the U.S. Army. When the opportunity to assume a command post arose, LTC Castillo Kickbusch shocked the military by deciding to retire.  She chose to honor her mother's dying wish to get back to her roots and become a community leader.

      In addition to being an advocate for education, Consuelo serves as a featured motivational speaker with corporations and government agencies to develop the leadership and peak performance of their employees. She firmly believes that businesses need strong leaders and a talented, diverse workforce in order to compete successfully on the global stage.

      Through a thoughtful and introspective presentation, Retired Lieutenant Colonel Consuelo Castillo Kickbusch will discuss leadership, service, and leaving a legacy. With her 20+ years of experience in the U.S. Army, she knows a thing or two about leading and about being a woman in a male dominated field! Her insights on leadership will help you reflect upon your own leadership style and will inspire and challenge you to not only lead - but to leave a legacy of distinction.

      This webinar was held December 4, 2007. This webinar was generously sponsored by Bank of America.

      Click here to listen to this webinar.

      *By registering for this webinar, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Webinars: Gaining

      Gaining the Competitive Advantage Through Building a Strategic Network

      In this webinar, Kathryn Mayer discusses key strategies in developing a peer network that facilitates career acceleration.  The research on successful leaders demonstrates that your network needs to be comprised of Pacing Partners™ or many types of mentors.  Pacing Partners™ are defined as colleagues whom you collaborate with to stimulate each of you to your best performance.  The relationship can function on four levels based on varied degrees of trust and expertise:  friendly competitor, challenger, mentor, and role model.  While most programs focus on finding and developing mentors, this seminar provides practical tips and techniques for cultivating strategic peer relationships in order to broaden your network and accelerate your career.

      This webinar was held September 18, 2008. This webinar was generously sponsored by the Kellogg Company.

      Click here to listen to this webinar.

      About the Presenter:

      MayerMs. Mayer founded KC Mayer Consulting, Inc. in 2003 to provide sophisticated and customized leadership development solutions for Fortune 100 to 1000 companies to drive their efforts to attract, develop and retain emerging and high potential business leaders. KC Mayer Consulting works with clients in the United States and Europe in competitive industries ranging from investment banking to pharmaceuticals, with a special emphasis on women in the workplace and diversity issues. KC Mayer clients include Credit Suisse, Citigroup Europe, Lehman Brothers, Merrill Lynch, Symbol Technologies, Glaxo Smith Kline, Henry Schein, United Entertainment Media, Price Waterhouse Coopers, and Selective Insurance, among others.

      Ms. Mayer has a proven 20-year track record of coaching business professionals, guiding companies through transformative change, and designing learning systems to transition professionals into new roles, develop leaders, enhance team dynamics, strengthen core competencies, and change behavior. She began her business career in the highly demanding and competitive investment banking and business consulting industries where she honed her unique approach to leadership and developed a proprietary strategic leadership model called Collaborative Competition.™  Ms. Mayer’s vision of competition offers clients a strategy to maximize the value of their greatest asset—human capital—to the fullest potential by building on strengths and through collaboration, developing areas that need improvement. It is a win-win strategy. Ms. Mayer wants everyone to find their competitive sensibilities and calibrate them to their greatest competitive advantage.  Ms. Mayer’s passion for competition dates back to her career as a ranked junior tennis player. She was a top ranked amateur tennis player for 25 years. This is where Ms. Mayer first discovered the power of learning from your competition rather than fearing it. 

      She has recently completed a book on how women can succeed in the most competitive industries and enjoy it, Collaborative Competition ™: A Woman’s Guide to Succeeding by Competing.  Kathryn has interviewed successful and powerful women around the country.

      *By registering for this Webinar, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

       

      Webinars: Emerging Strategies

      Emerging Strategies for Leveraging a Global Workforce

      The questions facing global business today are numerous. How do companies recruit people who understand and respond to challenges across borders and cultures — not to mention developing, motivating and retaining employees located in different regions of the world?  Perhaps most important, how does a global company bring its far-flung employee base together, working as one team, sharing common values and driving toward the same strategic goals?  Drawing on her 20+ years of experience leading diverse teams and organizations across Caterpillar, Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Tana Utley will describe the strategies she has employed to leverage the skills and perspectives of a global workforce to deliver product development excellence. 

      This webinar was held February 12, 2008. This webinar was generously sponsored by Booz Allen Hamilton.

      Temporarily Offline

       

       About the Presenter:

      Tana Utley
      Tana Utley is Chief Technology Officer and Vice President with responsibility for the Technology and Solutions Division (T&SD) at Caterpillar Inc.

      T&SD is the research and development arm of Caterpillar.  Caterpillar spends more than $1 billion dollars on R&D each year, and T&SD’s nearly 3000 employees worldwide are responsible for a third of this investment.  With facilities in the US, UK, India and China, T&SD controls engine, machine, and systems and components research, design and testing, product development and new technology introduction. 

      Utley joined Caterpillar in 1986 and has held a variety of engineering, strategic planning and management positions throughout the company. Prior to joining T&SD in 2007, she led the Electronic & Electrical Systems business unit in Caterpillar’s Motion & Power Control Division, and served as the director of Engine Design at the Large Engine Products & Fuel Systems Division.

      Utley holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Bradley University and a master of science degree in management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

      *By registering for this Webinar, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Webinars: Excelling

      Excelling as the Technical Guru

      In this Webinar, Dr. Carrie Leonard will show you how to become one of those Subject Matter Experts that populate most engineering companies. She will show you how to transition (or even envision) a career that takes you from working on one task or project to multiple projects. She will show you how to advance in a technical path without becoming a Manager. This webinar will address those questions and the role of a senior scientist or engineer in an Engineering organization.

      This webinar was held May 28, 2008. This webinar was generously sponsored by BAE SYSTEMS.

      Click here to listen to the webinar.

      About the Presenter:

      Leonard

      Dr. Carrie Leonard has over 15 years experience in ocean optics, including ocean color analysis, physical/biological interactions, and spectral target detection.She received a B.S. in Oceanography from Humboldt State University and a PhD in Physical Oceanography from University of Maryland. Dr. Leonard currently is the BAE Systems Honolulu manager of scientists and software engineers responsible for the development, application, and integration of target detection methods for hyper- and multi-spectral imagery. 


      *By registering for this Webinar, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Webinars: Building

      Building a Successful Career in the Traditionaly Male-Dominated Engineering and Technology Industry

      CJ Popp and Lauren Silverman discuss how you can succeed in a male-dominated industry. By sharing their personal stories, hear how they built careers on Wall Street in the technology sector. In today's world, we like to believe that women are viewed as equals to our male counter-parts in the business world; however, we are still an obvious minority in the technology and engineering sectors that are dominated by male managers and peers. CJ Popp and Lauren Silverman will share some of the lessons that they learned along the way about how to maneuver to the senior ranks and be recognized and promoted for their accomplishments.

      This webinar was held November 29, 2007. This webinar was generously sponsored by Lehman Brothers.

      Click here to listen to this webinar.

      About the Speakers

      CJPopp
      CJ Popp has 18 years of experience in the technology sector, and works in the Information Technology division for Lehman Brothers as a Project Manager on the Data Center Strategy team as well as managing the Communications and Marketing initiatives for the Infrastructure & Engineering Support division. In her current role, CJ is the IT Project Leader responsible for the build out of Lehman Brothers new 446,000 square foot Data Center currently under construction.  She is one of three females on a project team of over 80 people.  

       

       


      SilvermanLauren Silverman is the global head of Database Support for Lehman Brothers. In this position she interacts globally with the business and technology divisions of the firm, setting strategic priorities and ensuring global initiatives are managed and completed successfully. Lauren currently is responsible for more than 80 database professionals with a presence in every region, supporting 5 database platforms and over 1,000 servers containing 13,000 databases on a 24x7 basis. All application groups in the firm rely on her group’s services. 
       

       

      *By registering for this Webinar, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Webinars: The Secret to Career Acceleration

      The Secret to Career Acceleration: Enjoy the Stretch Zone

      How comfortable are you with taking career risks? As engineers, you are focused on helping companies minimize risk. In contrast, women who advance to senior leadership roles have learned to get comfortable taking smart career risks. Smart career risk taking comes from understanding the four zones of performance: blah, comfort, stretch, and yikes. The stretch zone is characterized by trying out new behaviors that energize and allow growth without causing a "breakdown" response or significantly diminishing your effectiveness. The goal of this web seminar is to increase self-awareness of your stretch zone and what interpersonal and environmental elements you need to grow professionally. Join Kathryn Mayer as she teaches you how to become more comfortable with taking career risks.

      This webianr was generously sponsored by ITT.

      Click here to listen to this webinar.

      About the Presenter:

      MayerMs. Mayer founded KC Mayer Consulting, Inc. in 2003 to provide  sophisticated and customized leadership development solutions for Fortune 100 to 1000 companies to drive their efforts to attract, develop and retain emerging and high potential business leaders.

      Ms. Mayer has a proven 20-year track record of coaching business professionals, guiding companies through transformative change, and designing learning systems to transition professionals into new roles, develop leaders, enhance team dynamics, strengthen core competencies, and change behavior.

      She began her business career in the highly demanding and competitive investment banking (Goldman Sachs and Citigroup) and business consulting industries (Deloitte and Touche) where she honed her unique approach to leadership and developed a proprietary strategic leadership model called Collaborative Competition.™  She has recently completed a book on how women can succeed in the most competitive industries and enjoy it, Collaborative Competition™:  The New Strategic Mindset for Women in Business.  A Women's Guide to Succeeding by Competing.  Kathryn has interviewed successful and powerful women around the country.

      Webinars: Member Services

      New SWE Member Services Center Open House Training

      Watch either of these webinars for a tour and overview of the new Member Services Center that was launched April 15. One webinar is for members and one is for leaders. The webinars should enable a seamless transition to this important SWE online tool.

      Member Open House Webinar

      The Member Open House covers:

      Login with new User ID
      Your SWE profile update
      Sample member renewal
      Access of member database
      Member searches

      Member Webinar Replay


      Leader Open House Webinar

      The Leader Open House covers all of the above plus items for SWE leaders who regularly retrieve data and reports from the Member Services Center:

      Login with new User ID
      Your SWE profile update
      Sample member renewal
      Access of member database
      Member searches
      Section roster downloads
      Description of these features:
      Region, section, and MAL leadership updates
      National committee member updates
      Annual financial reports

      Leader Webinar Replay

       

      *By registering for this webinar, you agree to SWE's Terms of Use.

      MEMBER - Leadership Report

      SWE Reporting Center Overview

      SWE is pleased to provide Section leadership with access to the newly released SWE Reporting Center. The Reporting Center provides Section/MAL Presidents, Treasurers, and Data Officers with real-time membership reporting capabilities. Three membership reports are now available for on-line printing in either Adobe PDF or Microsoft Excel format; these on-line reporting capabilities replace paper reports previously mailed once per month from SWE Headquarters to the Section President.

      The Reporting Center is available 24/7/365, and reflects real-time data, thus Paid and Unpaid Listings that a leader runs today will reflect the section’s actual paid and unpaid membership as of today. SWE anticipates this will provide greater flexibility and convenience to section leadership to manage their membership; a roster report could be run immediately prior to a section meeting, for example, or the New Section Members report could be run twice per month to contact new members more quickly.

      To access the reporting module, section leadership need only log in to the SWE web site and go to www.swe.org/membershipreports or click on the link on the Member Services page. Then follow the on-screen instructions or the steps below to print reports.

      Paid and Unpaid Listings (a.k.a. Roster Reports)

      To produce a Paid and/or Unpaid Listing report, simply click on the Roster Report hyperlink located on the main Reporting Center screen. A NEW WINDOW will appear in your task bar for entry of report parameters; click on the window and maximize it.

      Choose either the PDF or Excel report format option in the first drop down box. Select the Payment Status option (Paid, Unpaid or Both) and the Member Type option (Professional, Student or Both) for the report as well. The BOD, Region Governors and Membership Committee have extended options for Region and/or Section selection as well. Click Run Report. You may either save the report to file, or open the report. Close the Roster report window when done, and return to the main Reporting Center screen. Keep in mind the Paid and Unpaid Listings will reflect real-time data as of the moment you are running the report.

      New Section Members Report (a.k.a. Change Into a Section Report)

      To produce a New Section Members Report, simply click on the New Section Members hyperlink located on the main Reporting Center screen. A NEW WINDOW will appear in your task bar for entry of report parameters; click on the window and maximize it.

      Choose either the PDF or Excel report format option in the first drop down box. Select the Beginning and Ending Dates for your report, changing months if necessary using the symbols to the left and right of the month name. The date range you specify will return all individuals who were placed into your section during that period. Note that if you use today’s date in your query as your end date, you’ll want to use that same date as your beginning date the next time you run the report. The BOD, Region Governors and Membership Committee have extended options for Region and/or Section selection as well. Click Run Report. You may either save the report to file, or open the report. Close the New Section Members report window when done, and return to the main Reporting Center screen.

      Former Section Members Report (a.k.a Change Out of a Section Report)

      To produce a Former Section Members Report, simply click on the Former Section Members hyperlink located on the main Reporting Center screen. A NEW WINDOW will appear in your task bar for entry of report parameters; click on the window and maximize it.

      Choose either the PDF or Excel report format option in the first drop down box. Select the Beginning and Ending Dates for your report, changing months if necessary using the symbols to the left and right of the month name. The date range you specify will return all individuals who moved out of your section during that period. Note that if you use today’s date in your query as your end date, you’ll want to use that same date as your beginning date the next time you run the report to ensure you don’t miss any activity. The BOD, Region Governors and Membership Committee have extended options for Region and/or Section selection as well. Click Run Report. You may either save the report to file, or open the report. Close the New Section Members report window when done, and return to the main Reporting Center screen.

          

      Career Center - PD Article - Flying Forces

      Frequent Flying Forces Family Flexibility

      by Jean Panos and Dawn LeKang

      In the nearly 20 years since I began my engineering career, I've observed a great increase in the amount of business travel expected of engineers. There seem to be a number of causes, many of which reflect the changes in engineering and manufacturing during this time period. Also, because of e-mail, telecommuting, the internet, cell phones, etc., the work of an engineer (or any profession for that matter) can be conducted on the go. However, despite the fact that an e-mail message can be retrieved from anywhere, attendance at a child's school open house can't be done on the go. Thus the challenges of combining work related travel with the responsibilities associated with parenthood. Many parents have come up with some imaginative ways of coping with the travel itself, and the ramifications on their careers.

      • Certainly everyone is traveling more, as evidenced by the packed flights so typical of both business and leisure travel. As an engineer, I wonder, have engineers been singled out to do more traveling? Given the changes in American industry in recent years, I think they have. In my opinion, the changes are a result of the following.
      • Companies have outsourced functions and operations that used to be done in-house. This forces engineers to follow manufacturing work at far-away (sometimes international) suppliers.
      • Engineering functions have become blurred as interdisciplinary teams have taken over. Home office engineers get sent to do what field and plant engineers used to do, and those full-time field and plant positions have been eliminated. This is a quality improvement in the sense that functions are no longer "thrown over the wall" and possibly misunderstood. However, it puts a lot more responsibility on the shoulders of a single engineer.
      • Emphasis on relationship development and customer satisfaction finds designers joining the sales and marketing people to meet their customers.
      • The crisis management mentality that continues to permeate most corporations finds people "managing" crises by throwing their weight around -- in person. This also leads to much last-minute travel.

      Special concerns of women business travelers

      The reality is that women still carry much of the day to day workload at home. Travel, especially last-minute travel, presents inflexible barriers. There are statistical data that show that the representation of women in other traditionally male, professional fields such as law and medicine has increased much faster than in engineering. Neither of these fields is known for its short hours, but neither field requires a lot of travel. Your customers are usually in your community and come to you. You may work long hours but they are regular, and are generally compensated in a way that permits you to hire sufficient help. Frequently there is some flexibility in scheduling. I know practitioners who take their kids into the office after school for a few hours (unheard of in most corporations) or take an extended dinner break with the family and return to work late in the evening.

      Travel sounds glamorous to those who don't do it too often. Think of the TV ad with the worn out traveler slumping down the hotel hall and the voice-over asking if he did it..."for the miles." Not only is the travel itself exhausting, but there are the responsibilities at home that don't go away while you are gone. Caregivers must scramble for alternate (and frequently, complicated) arrangements; meals must be cooked by someone else; the lawn must be cut in your absence. Some things simply cannot be hired out for example, attending a school function or soccer game. Having a stay-at-home spouse mitigates such disruption at home. These days, a stay-at-home spouse is more the exception than the rule, and progressive companies operate under this reality.

      In some cases, travel is impossible for women. Obviously, travel is restricted to women who are toward the end of a pregnancy. The single mom or dad may not be able to travel if there is no one who can care for the children. In other cases, the mom or dad may be home bound because the other spouse is on travel. These situations call for both unique solutions and understanding bosses and co-workers.

      Judicious use of travel

      So what's the answer? Travel can not be eliminated and it certainly should not be just because it is "challenging". However, in some instances, it is possible to eliminate the travel and still accomplish the 'goal'. We have all been in situations where travel was impossible and somehow we managed. Travel budget frozen? It gets done by phone, fax, and e-mail, doesn't it? Relationship building is important to business, but does every member of the team have to go on every trip? When I was unable to travel during my pregnancy, another employee traveled in my place. This created an opportunity for the other employee and an opportunity for me to 'train' a colleague. I was available via phone for support. The whole situation was quite positive for my colleague, the supplier and myself.

      Unfortunately there are some engineers who use travel as an escape from their home responsibilities. They consider it a job perk and assume this feeling is shared by others. It may be necessary simply to speak up and alert them that you consider travel one way, but not the only way, to get the job done.

      The challenge for the one who can not travel is to find "solutions". Make sure the goal of the trip is well understood. Anticipate the questions that supervisors and peers will have and be ready to answer those questions. Also, if travel is not possible in "certain" situations, clearly articulate those before the situations come up. For example, a colleague of mine can not travel when her husband is on travel. When she knows those dates, she lets her supervisor know so that, if possible, she can arrange travel around those dates. If something does come up for those dates, she offers several alternative ways to "get the job done". The key here is planning, communication and innovative solutions.  

      Travel coping strategies

      If all the travel is really necessary, how do people cope? Most rely heavily on family members although nowadays, Grandma herself may be working and traveling. Some engineers are lucky enough to have colleagues who understand their situation and will trade off or cover their travel at inconvenient times. Still others help out co-workers and friends with overnight child care in exchange for the same service. Many traveling parents become masters of the one-day trip - leaving the home in the wee hours of the morning to catch the first flight out and staggering back in from the last flight back. This can't be done day after day, but really does minimize the disruption your children perceive, as you are really only gone for one dinner/evening period.

      Dual career couples with children need advance notice of travel to be sure both are not out of town at the same time. Sometimes, one half of a dual career couple will not have a lot of travel but will need some flexibility at work to pick up the slack when the partner goes out of town. Several engineers take their children along on trips with them when they can -- in one case, the child visited with the family of the engineer's customer, had a terrific time, and mom got the job done.

      One important factor to keep in mind is that travel inconveniences do not solely apply to parents. A colleague once griped, "Why does everyone assume I want to do all the traveling just because I'm the single one?" True, she was taking courses toward her engineering master's degree, and obviously, the frequent travel caused her to miss classes. Some people with heavy travel schedules must skip a semester or two and take more time to earn their part-time degree. Realize a single woman may also have care giving responsibilities -- for her own parents. Since the critical mass of women engineers (such as it is) began basically with the baby boomers, this is not yet a hot issue. Wait about 10 years. Not too many of today's mid-career 40-year-olds have an 80-year-old mother as I do. But guess what, folks? Many of your kids will!

      Career coping strategies

      If one is unwilling or unable to travel, it makes the most sense to try to find a job function that is not too far off your career path, but that requires little or no travel. One single mom who tired of seeing her young son only on weekends sought a single-plant project engineering function. Corporations would be wise to try to keep a variety of jobs with light travel requirements, although most engineers who get off the travel track perceive negative career implications. Corporations need to learn further that a cutback for child rearing (or elder care) consumes maybe 10 years of a 40-year or more career. I believe, to write a good employee off for such a short period of self-imposed travel limits is a costly mistake.

      Unique Travel Solutions

      SWE (Society of Women Engineers) has included offerings for children at their annual conference since the 1980's. The program for school aged children has continued to evolve, and the 2000 conference in Washington DC will include trips to many sites in the nation's capital. The philosophy has been to offer a fun learning experience, with a technology slant, which takes advantage of places unique to the conference city. SWE-2000 is also offering a Family Lounge to help conference attendees with very young children find a place to relax and play during the conference days. Providing child care at conferences is becoming more and more common. Some parents are finding this a unique way to combine work related travel with parenthood responsibilities.

      Travel and family life can be compatible, but it is a challenging balancing act. Engineers need to use their personal travel "energy" budget wisely, and understand that relationship building in the home is just as important as the relationship building they seek by visiting their customers and colleagues.

      Contact the Authors:
      Jean Panos 717/747-9304 rjmjpanos@sprintmail.com
      Dawne LeKang 703/263-9099 dlekang@rst.inri.com 

       


       

      Career Center - PD Article - Employee Retention

      Employee Retention

      By Tricia Berry, November 30, 1998

      Introduction XXX Corporation Internal Newsletter

      Jennifer Doe is retiring from XXX Corporation after 42 years of dedicated service. Jennifer Doe began her career at XXX after graduating from ZZZ University. After beginning in the mail room, Jennifer worked her way upwards in XXX to the position from which she is retiring. After spending numerous years sacrificing time away from family and friends to be dedicated to the job, Jennifer will spend her first month of retirement traveling to visit relatives.

      Turnover is becoming a serious problem in todayâs corporate environment as the economy continues to expand and the labor market continues to tighten. Retirement notices like the one above will likely land in the history books as employees are shifting from a view of lifelong employment with one company to a view of varying jobs and varying corporations every few years. In addition, employees are increasingly demanding a balance between work and family life and are not willing to sacrifice everything for their careers and their employers.

      Retention and turnover are economic issues and corporations have a financial incentive to retain top employees (Branch). A major portion of a corporationâs wealth is invested in its intellectual capital - the knowledge, skills, and abilities of their employees. Companies lose money when these items walk out the door. One study shows that turnover can cost as much as four times the departing personâs salary (Harkins, ãWhy Employees Stay - or Goä). It is to a companyâs economic advantage to reduce turnover so that the costs of turnover - marketing costs to attract applicants, hiring and processing costs, lost production costs, lost customers, inferior quality, lower employee morale, and inefficiency - can be reduced (Herman, ãReducing Costly Employee Turnoverä).

      Comprehensive retention strategies involve assessing current situations, measuring turnover and retention costs, evaluating retention strategies and programs, and planning for expected turnover and a changing workforce culture (Harkins, ãAMEP = Four-step Strategy for Retaining Employeesä). Retention strategies must begin at the time of selection and then continue through employment and the time when an employee seeks to leave the organization (Davison). All aspects must be considered in order for a strategy to be fully implemented and effective.

      pdarticle_employeeretention.gif

       

      Source: "Five Ingredients for an Employee Retention Formula." David Stum. HR Focus, Sept. 1998.

      In order to decrease turnover rates, employers must understand the reasons behind defections. By determining the significant factors behind each defection, employers can optimize programs to best retain valued employees. Corporations must be willing to invest in the efforts necessary to gather this information in order to evaluate for consistencies and opportunities for improvement. Figure 1 describes some of the key factors in employee retention comparing satisfaction levels in employees planning to leave a corporation and those committed to stay. A Workforce/E-span survey provided similar information from 471 responses out of 2000 surveys sent to business week subscribers with managerial or professional titles. Figure 2 details these survey results of issues influential in the decision to stay with a corporation or leave.

      From these two surveys, it can be seen that there are four basic components that a retention strategy must address in order to retain top employees: effective management, career development opportunities, life-work balance benefits and programs, and compensation and recognition. The effective management component deals with such issues from the surveys as respectful treatment, ability of top management, coaching and feedback from management, and culture and values. Training, opportunity to learn new skills, career advancement opportunities, and job responsibilities fall under the career development opportunities component. Child-care considerations, convenience to home and ease of commute, benefits packages, and relationships with co-workers fall under the life-work balance benefits and programs component. Issues such as pay or salary, recognition for a job well done, and long-term rewards fall under the compensation and recognition component. A corporation must take into account each component and incorporation appropriate measures within each into its retention strategy in order to retain top employees and remain competitive in the labor market of today.

       

      pdarticle_stayleave.gif 

      Source: Workforce/E-span Survey. Workforce, June 1998.

      Retention Strategy Components

      Effective Management

      Effective management includes effective hiring of skilled employees, equitable treatment, and strong leadership (Bohl and Ermel). According to Phil Harkins in his 1998 Workforce article ãWhy Employees Stay - Or Goä, in order for management to reduce turnover, it must follow five basic guidelines:

      1. Pay attention to top employees to make sure they are being developed, rewarded, and recognized for their contributions to the organization.
      2. Build and maintain relationships with top employees so that departure from the organization would be a personal, very difficult decision for the employee.
      3. Increase confidence and hope among employees through a participative vision and strategy.
      4. Build loyalty, commitment and trust so that employees can offer these back to the organization.
      5. Create clear communication pathways so that employees always learn important information first hand.

      By paying attention to top employees, managers may be able to intervene and eliminate costly turnovers when top employees begin to evaluate opportunities. This attentiveness to top employees can help lead to strengthened relationships and increased commitment and trust - all of which are results of respectful treatment of employees. These relationships and a participative vision and strategy help top employees have a sense of connection to the corporation, thus a personal commitment to its success. All of these turnover reduction actions by management, however, cannot flourish unless the corporate culture is one where retention of top employees is a priority and employees are treated as individuals, as entrepreneurs, and as valued entities within the organization.

      Intervention

      Effective management within a corporation must be able to identify potential retention issues before they arise and address issues with employees before they give their two week notices. Signs will be evident when employees are beginning to evaluate other opportunities and look outside their current opportunity. Employees may begin to withdraw from others and reduce participation with team members and fellow employees both inside and outside of work activities (Alexander). Productivity may begin to decrease and work hours may begin to fluctuate or suffer due to increased discontentment (Alexander).

      By paying close attention and approaching discontent employees prior to announcements of departure, managers may be able to retain more employees. Sometimes a simple effort by the manager and some quality listening time may be all that is required to relieve the frustration of the employee and to convince her to remain (Alexander). An important question to ask an employee who is considering leaving is, ãwhat are you looking for that you âre not getting in your current jobä (Baker). By asking this question and listening intently to the employee, simple solutions may be evident. The employee could list desires and wants for a job, thus showing what may be lacking in her current position and allowing for potential changes and counteroffers to be made in order to retain the employee (Baker). Positions or other opportunities within the company may be available for the employee, thus allowing for a repositioning of the employee in order to keep her. The employee could also be asked to discuss the pros and cons of an alternative job offer and the manager could express to the employee his or her value to the company (Baker). By forcing an employee to make the pros and cons evaluation, all items may be considered and the employee may decide that their current position is actually the better one. A managerâs chance of retaining employees increases when an employee understands that she is valued and that the manager and company desire her to stay.  

      Respectful Treatment

      Employees want to be treated in the same manner as customers would be treated. Employees demand open and honest communication along with unrestricted information required for superior job performance. Employees want to be empowered to make the decisions necessary in their position and must have the required tools and information easily and readily accessible. If employees do not feel they are being treated respectfully, they may likely seek out another position where they will.

      Empowerment / Full Accessibility

      "Too many rules and regulations may overwhelm employees and inhibit their judgment and individuality. Provide them with the necessary tools and authority to serve the customerä (Cosenza and Taylor). Employees must have all information readily available at their fingertips to make the decisions necessary to complete their jobs effectively and efficiently. Oren Harari says in an April 1998 Management Review article, ãyou canât have people taking on the responsibilities of businesspeople if they donât have free, unfettered, unfiltered access to the information and conversations that businesspeople require.ä Trust is lost when people are kept in the dark and not provided the information they need to perform. When trust is lost and individuals are not able to adequately perform their jobs due to the corporate infrastructure, frustrations rise and turnover will inevitably increase.  

      Communication

      Generation Xers, the people born between 1965 and 1981, want supervisors who are interested in their work and communicate regularly how they are doing (Calabria). Supervisors and management must communicate the truth to employees no matter what. Companies can easily utilize an internal newsletter or an intranet to encourage involvement in new corporate projects and to announce and discuss corporate or industry developments. In addition, communications should include announcements of employee achievement and individual or team successes. Cosenza and Taylor, in an October 1997 HR Focus issue, remark, schedule team meetings regularly to exchange information and negate rumors. Successful marketing demands constant customer contact, interaction and attention. Don't your valued employees deserve the same?

      Another aspect to communication is that management must communicate directly with employees to determine their wants and their needs. Employees must be able to communicate what they require out of a position if employers are going to be able to attempt to retain these employees. Employers must also be willing to ask employees how they can better help the employees do their job. This relates back to management intervention as described previously.

      Sense of Connection

      Employees must feel that their ideas and their values are evident within the corporate culture. A corporationâs vision must be inspirational and able to be shared with all employees. When employees help to define the corporate vision and the corporate goals, employees feel more connected to the corporation and more committed to their work (Calabria). Harley-Davidson Inc. has employees so connected to its purpose that many employees have the company name tattooed on their bodies. ãEmployees are energized by the sense that theyâre somehow making a contributionä (Caudron).

      Employees have a better chance of feeling connected to a corporationâs bottom line if they completely understand the system in which they are working. Companies such as Springfield Remanufacturing train employees to read financial statements so that they can be more informed. Coors Brewing Company trains employees on economics so that they understand their impact on Coorsâ bottom line (Ettorre). The Dow Chemical Company holds training classes on the corporate vision, sales and profit goals, and financial calculations so that their employees have a sense of connection to the corporate goals and can understand their roles for the success of the organization. By increasing employee knowledge on the inner workings of the corporation, employees will become more connected, more committed and less likely to leave to another corporation.

      Entrepreneurial Attitude

      Minimal layers of bureaucracy and a free flow of information between employees who need to communicate in order to effectively complete their jobs are required in todayâs new business model (Harari). Employees need to be free to make quick decisions and to be accountable for them. Top performers typically want to get out there and try things as quickly as possible when they see the potential for great gains. The mindset must be there for employees to gather information, generate a hypothesis, test it quickly, gather feedback, and start all over again (Harari). The ãletâs try itä entrepreneurial attitude must prevail and companies must encourage employees to act on their own when they feel that they can make a difference and contribute to the company’s bottom line (Harari). If employees are not able to get out there and try things and act as entrepreneurs within the corporation, they may end up out on their own as entrepreneurs competing for the same customers and same markets.  

      Corporate Culture

      Corporations such as Ernst & Young have come to the realization that keeping good employees is key to business success and are making retention a part of their corporate culture. Ernst & Young has created an Office for Retention to evaluate retention strategies and to assist in the customization and individualization of policies and strategies in order to retain the best employees (Branch). Companies should believe in reciprocal investment where employers invest in the professional and personal development of employees with the intent that employees will invest their energy and abilities within the company (Calabria).

      Corporate culture is so important to employee retention, that companies are even joining together to share notes on effective programs. For example, in 1995 twenty-six firms including Marriott and ConAgra formed a consortium in New York called the Employer Group with the purpose to provide a forum for personnel managers to ãcompare notes on affordable programs for worker recruitment, retention, and reliabilityä (Denton). These companies are committed to learning from each other and modifying their culture in order to retain top employees and provide employees with greater opportunities.

      Generation Xers are redefining corporate culture and defining todayâs corporate coolness. They are demanding jobs that are exciting and entertaining. Employees are attracted to companies that offer a cause and an adventure where they can grow professionally and thrive intellectually (Harari). A positive reputation of a corporation can lead to increased interest in employment with the company and, thus, increased retention. Employees today want to work in an environment where they can express themselves and have a good time. The more friendships that can develop and the more interpersonal support, the better the chance to retain the top employees. Department or company parties, celebrations, sport event outings, and other social events help foster the exciting, fun environment that employees are demanding today (Harari). In addition, cool companies must celebrate diversity and not simply tolerate it or set quotas to achieve it. Diversity on every level, from affirmative action diversity to diversity in thought, work style, temperament and opinion, must be celebrated and encouraged (Caudron). Todayâs coolest companies have a turnover rate of 6.9 percent, almost 5 percent below the national average (Caudron). Coolness is a requirement for todayâs employees and corporate cultures must accommodate in order to attract and retain the future generation of workers.  

      Career Development Opportunities

      Employees want to make a difference with the work that they do. By providing employees with open career and advancement opportunities and broad skills training, employees will be able to define their own careers and make the difference they desire (Cosenza and Taylor). By providing the opportunities that they will not get elsewhere, employees will stay (Harari).

      The link between opportunities for advancement and training is very close. Employees who are given the opportunity to train and develop can contribute to the value of a company, thus providing the opportunity for employees to learn and grow within the corporation. With increased training and development, employees gain increased power to influence decisions and work cross-functionally despite perhaps a more rigid corporate structure (Bailey). Employee success stems from broadened experiences, expanded learning, and increased development - all provided through some form of training.

      Opportunities for Advancement

      Corporations can offer many means for advancement of employees such as internal job posting systems for employees, strategies of promoting from within, assessments and resources. Employees must feel as if they can advance within a corporation or they will move to another corporation where they can advance. 

      Internal Job Posting Systems

      Large companies have the opportunity to offer employees a wide range of career paths. If people are limited in the opportunities within an organization, they will leave to find opportunities elsewhere. By utilizing internal job posting systems, employees are able to see potential career paths and interview for positions they may otherwise have looked for external to the corporation. As an example, The Dow Chemical Company has an internal Job Announcement System (JAS). Jobs across the company are posted within the system and any employee within the company that meets the specified job requirements and has the skills and competencies desired may apply for the position. Through the system, Dow Chemical employees are able to determine what positions typically come available that they may be eligible for and can direct their career development activities accordingly. Open viewing, posting, and selection of positions within any corporation allow for employees to try for jobs for which they may have not otherwise been considered. In addition, an internal job posting system allows employees to search for new positions and expand their opportunities without having to look external to the corporation, thus reducing employee turnover.

      Promoting from Within

      Companies such as Mobil have searched through their corporate layers to identify the leaders of the future for the company. By providing these internal leaders with increased opportunities within the company, retention of the best and the brightest employees increases. With Mobil, each identified future leader rotates through various functional areas across the business and is assigned to a manager who is not his or her supervisor (Branch). Without an internal promotion strategy such as Mobilâs, employees will begin to see leaders come from external organizations and understand that their advancement opportunities are limited since outsiders move into the key leadership positions. By promoting from within, corporations provide opportunities internally that employees may have otherwise sought externally.

      Skills Assessments

      Employees should have the opportunity to assess the current skills they possess so that the skills can be compared to those required in desired positions within an organization. Skills assessments provide a means for employees to learn where they stand and provide a basis for goals that employees may develop for advancement and additional career opportunities. Companies such as Union Carbide and The Dow Chemical Company offer employees the opportunity to take skills assessment tests to determine areas of strength and weakness. By understanding their strengths and weaknesses, employees can determine what they need to do and what they need to concentrate on their development in order to broaden their career advancement opportunities.

      Developmental Resources Skills development occurs most effectively on the job. Early in a personâs career, technical skills and career development may be the most critical training issues. As careers progress, however, additional skills development in leadership and management areas may become the focus of training programs. By coaching new employees and providing assignments that broaden employee experiences, employees continue to learn and contribute to the corporation. Companies such as DELSTAR, an airport retail specialty shop owner and operator, provide development opportunities to employees to help them move up within the company. DELSTAR offers a supervisory training program, and assistant manager training program, an inventory training program, and advanced selling techniques (Calabria). Each of these programs is aimed at providing employees with career development opportunities and a means of advancement. Classroom training on specific items may also be required and memberships to professional associations, subscriptions to journals, access to industry experts, and online resources can help extend the development capabilities of an organization (McMorrow).

      Training

      Ninety-four percent of companies surveyed in Watson Wyattâs Strategic Reward survey use training as a retention tool, thus making training the number one retention tool found in the survey (Bailey). Companies must promote lifelong learning in order to keep todayâs employees who want to feel as if they have gained knowledge over the workday and throughout their career (Caudron). Training and education must be viewed as an investment into the future capital of companies and not as a cost that is taken from the bottom line (Harari).

      Orientations

      DELSTAR invests extensively in training as a majority of its employees are disadvantaged and have never worked in the retail industry (Calabria). Orientations introduce new employees to the retail business and two week selling goals are set. The Director of Training and Development for DELSTAR evaluates the goal achievement of new employees and offers personal training as needed when employees are struggling (Calabria). By making this initial investment, employees are more likely to succeed, achieve personal satisfaction, and remain with the corporation.

      Mentoring

      Mentoring programs foster a learning environment within an organization and provide employees with a confidant and an advisor. Mentoring allows new employees to learn how to be productive at the start of employment, thus providing employees greater satisfaction and a greater sense of connection to the organization. Employees with mentors may be able to obtain career guidance, project assistance, and corporate culture advice that cannot be obtained easily from a manager. Figure 3 shows some of the direct benefits of having a mentor as given from an accountemps mentoring survey. This increased satisfaction and increased productivity at the beginning of a new position helps address some of the key retention issues with employees.

       

      pdarticle_benefitsmentor.gif
       
       

      Source: "Mentoring: Building Your Companyâs Intellectual Capital." Max Messmer. HR Focus, September 1998.

      Life-Work Balance Benefits and Programs

      Employees are placing increased importance on programs and benefits that help provide a balance between work and home life (Bailey). Programs that emphasize employee satisfaction are key and are ranging from flexible schedules to onsite massages to virtual teams to child care assistance. Employers must realize that individuals have lives outside of the office.

      The Calvert Group, an investment firm, has seen the benefits to life-work balance programs first hand. The Calvert Group includes such benefits for employees as 15 minutes of free massage therapy each week, tuition reimbursement for any class, flex time, casual dress, and 12 days of community leave per year. ãBy tying benefits to employeesâ basic survival, emotional, psychological and spiritual needsä, the company has reduced turnover from an industry average of 20% to 5% (Dutton, ãNurturing Employees and the Bottom Lineä). Other companies should take note if they want to compete and retain top employees within their corporations.

      Flexible Schedules

      According to Watson Wyattâs Strategic Rewards survey, flexible work schedules were the second best retention tool for the 614 U.S. employers surveyed (Bailey). A poll of all employees at Ernst & Young found that 65% of employees would have left the firm had flexible schedules not been available (Branch). These numbers show that employees today are demanding flexible schedules and companies must accommodate in order to keep them. Flexible schedules are also increasingly important for the older workforce. With the number of qualified workers decreasing, older, experienced workers must be enticed to remain with companies and flexible schedules is one way to do this.

      Flexible schedules can include the following types of programs: part time such as a reduced hour work week, casual employment programs where skilled retirees may work up to some number of hours each year without jeopardizing pension benefits, flexible work schedules, nontraditional part time such as a one week on / one week off schedule, phased retirement where hours are reduced over a period of time, rehearsal retirement where older workers may work part time with their employer while working non-paid hours at a volunteer organization, and job sharing where older workers share time with a younger employee (Fyock). As an example, companies such as BASF Corporation and The Dow Chemical Company offer 9-80 schedules where employees can work 80 hours over 9 days and have every other Friday off to spend with family. Aerospace Corporation allows skilled retirees ãto work up to 1000 hours each year without jeopardizing their pension benefitsä (Fyock). By being flexible in the work schedules offered, corporations can keep employees who may have looked for flexibility elsewhere.  

      Household Chore Assistance

      Many corporations are beginning to offer household chore assistance such as laundry services and handyman services. Solutions to employee household problems and challenges that could decrease employee productivity are typically minimal in cost to the employer yet provide incredible benefits through increased productivity andincreased employee satisfaction. Productivity stays high when people do not have to worry about the little things in life.

      Two examples of companies offering such household chore assistance are Wilton Connor Packaging Inc. and Andersen Consulting. Wilton Connor Packaging Inc., a Charlotte, North Carolina company of 450 employees, offers such services as an onsite laundry center and a handyman service for emergency-type home repairs. Wilton Connor looked for ways to simplify the lives of their employees and has done so for only $0.15 per employee per hour ($540 per day) with the return on investment of minimal turnover, high quality rankings on product, and a productive workforce (Dolan). Andersen Consulting offers a concierge service that will arrange for someone perform such duties as pick up subway tokens, wait for furniture delivery or the cable person, and pick up cars from repair shops (Dolan). By spending a small amount of money on these employee assistance efforts, Andersen Consulting and Wilton Connor Packaging are saving on employee turnover and benefiting from employee devotion and satisfaction.

      Child Assistance

      Corporations that understand employee child-care needs provide such things as sponsored public schools, on-site day care, or child-care subsidies. Companies such as Sequent, American Bankers Insurance Group, and Hewlett Packard have schools on site that meet the educational requirements of the local school district. At American Bankers, parents are encouraged to visit children at lunchtime and after school and the company has seen employee turnover drop from 13%, on average, to 5% for employees with children in the school (Dolan). Sequent also has an on-site child care center for employee children and many companies are providing local school evaluations and adoption assistance. When employees are satisfied with the care and education of their children, they may be less likely to move elsewhere where child assistance may not be equivalent.

      Wellness and Fitness Centers

      By keeping their employees fit and well and providing means of achieving personal wellness goals, companies are finding that employees are more satisfied and more productive and perhaps less likely to defect. American Bankers has a fully equipped gym that employees are encouraged to use before and after work and during lunch. One employee interviewed by Forbes thanks the company for helping her lose 173 pounds through the wellness and fitness center. She claims she ãwill always be indebted to the companyä (Dolan). Northern Telecom also found the benefits of a fitness center when a survey of employees indicated that 91% felt the facility would reduce stress and increase the quality of work time (Dolan). Saturn offers a facility that has a gym, barbecue pits, basketball hoops, and a baseball diamond at its plant. Mobil Oil has a jogging path at its headquarters (Dutton, ãThe Re-Enchantment of Work). Celanese offers a 9 hole golf course at its Clear Lake facility. Dow Chemical offers a fitness center at its corporate headquarters and offers subsidized membership to a local fitness club at its Freeport facility. All of these wellness and fitness facilities cost the corporations money, but the benefits of employee satisfaction, commitment, and retention outweigh the expenses.

      Sabbatical Programs

      Some companies are introducing sabbatical programs in order to recruit and retain top employees. Patagonia, Inc., a California based company, provides personal growth opportunities to employees through its Internship Program. The Internship Program allows employees to take a paid leave-of-absence from their jobs at Patagonia for any length of time between one week and one month to work for a nonprofit organization of their choice (Calabria). Patagonia has found that the program ãimproves employee morale, increases their loyalty to the company and, in turn, probably makes better workersä (Calabria). Xeroxâs sabbatical program allows several employees each year to take paid leaves of absences to work for charitable organizations. The belief by Xerox is that, while the bottom line impact to the company is likely not measurable, the benefit to the company comes in the ability to attract and retain top people and the new skills that the employees bring back to the organization after a sabbatical (Dolan).

      Telecommuting

      Companies like Gandalf Technologies, Inc., a computer networking company in California, are allowing employees to spend several days each week telecommuting (Dolan). Employees are finding that they are spending more quality time with their families and working longer hours than they were previously. Thus, employers are left with happier, more productive employees. By allowing employees to be flexible and acknowledging the technological advances available, employers can retain employees who may have otherwise looked for positions closer to their homes or families.

      Compensation and Recognition

      Employees today are not motivated by traditional pay programs and pay has become an ãexpected reward for coming to workä (Davison). According to Bill DeGenaro of DeGenaro & Associates, a management consultant firm, ãLack of recognition is a common thread among both political defectors and disenchanted employees - the feeling that oneâs contributions donât matterä (Dutton, ãThe Re-enchantment of Workä). Recognition today must be meaningful, highly visible and show how an individual has made a significant contribution to the organization.

      Meaningful Recognition

      Employees want to be recognized for the work that do and the goals they accomplish. Meaningful recognition occurs in a timely and equitable manner. Such things as spot cash awards, certificates presented at department meetings, recognition meals, or even a simple verbal thank you can go a long way to increase employee satisfaction and improve employee morale (Bohl and Ermel). Meaningful recognition can also come in the form of what people are recognized with. By understanding the hobbies and interests of employees, meaningful recognition can include tickets to sport events or theater events or gift certificates to fancy restaurants (Dolan). Without meaningful recognition, employees may begin to feel their accomplishments and contributions are going unnoticed and are unimportant. With increased dissatisfaction comes an increased chance for turnover.

      Pay Equity

      Employees should be paid what they are worth on the open market and not what the corporate guidelines require. Employees not paid relative to their worth will seek other employment opportunities where they may feel better compensated for the skills and attributes that they possess (Harkins, ãWhy Employees Stay - Or Goä). With the availability of information today through professional organizations, the Internet, and salary surveys, employees have little trouble finding out their true market worth and, if the incentive is large enough, will seek to be compensated at these values either within the corporation they are currently employed or elsewhere.

      Short-term Rewards

      Short-term rewards for employees include such things as retention bonuses, annual or quarterly bonuses, and financial target bonuses. Retention bonuses are paid to employees once they have completed some length of employment with the company. Motorola, for example, has a benefits package that includes a bonus of up to $5000 for employees who have remained with the company for ten years (Dolan). Retention bonuses are also designed to encourage employees to stay throughout some project or throughout such things as a corporate merger or takeover (ãThe Network Discussesä). Annual and quarterly bonuses focus on the short term goals and can be tied in to financial targets such as sales or economic profit (Bohl and Ermel). These short-term performance based bonuses reward employees for high performance and can encourage employees to focus on specific time targets and encourage employees to remain with the corporation as each financial target can be easily viewed and aimed at.

      Skill-based Pay

      Rewards should go to those who learn from experiences and creatively use the knowledge they gain. Companies should focus on improving the quality of thinking within their organizations and reward those who make an extra effort to broaden their knowledge base. By rewarding people for making this extra effort, employees will feel appreciated and continue to strive to expand their capabilities (Calabria). Skills-based pay encourages employees to learn and enhances employee satisfaction of top employees, thus decreasing turnover.

      Summary and Conclusions

      Retention has become a major issue within corporations as employers are struggling to keep the best and the brightest of their employees and reduce costly turnover. Employees are increasingly demanding a balance between work and family life and are not willing to sacrifice everything for their careers and their employers. Lifelong employment with one company is no longer a desired or necessary option to many employees and employees are continually searching out the best benefits, culture, and work environment. With turnover costs running as much as four times a personâs salary, corporations must make retention of top employees a priority and address the retention issues of employees in order to remain competitive in the marketplace. In order to retain top employees, corporations must have an effective comprehensive retention strategy that addresses four key components - effective management, career development opportunities, life-work balance benefits and programs, and compensation and recognition. While retention strategies of a given corporation may focus on one specific area, all four of these areas must be considered when looking to retain top employees within a corporation. Corporations who pay attention to these components and make concerted efforts to address them with corporate programs and policies will retain top employees, reduce costly turnover, and remain competitive in the marketplace.  

      References

      Alexander, Steve. ãHints of Discontent.ä  Computerworld.  Dec. 8, 1997, v31, n49, pp 62.
      Bailey, George.  ãTraining as a Recruitment Tool.ä  HR Focus. July 1998, pp 11-12.
      Baker, Marci.  ãHow to Hang on to Your Stars:  Even if You Canât Promise More Money, There are Plenty of Ways to Keep Top Performers in the Fold.ä  Working Woman., April 8, 1996, v21, n4, pp 19-20.
      Bohl, Don and Lauren Ermel.  ãResponding to a Tight Labor Market:  Using Incentives to Attract and Retain Talented Workers.ä  Compensation and Benefits Review. Nov.-Dec. 1997, v29, n6, pp 25-30.
      Branch, Shelly.  ãThe New Economy:  You Hired ÎEm. But Can You Keep ÎEm?ä Fortune. Nov. 9, 1998. pp 247.
      Calabria, David.  ãWhen Companies Give, Employees Give Back.ä  Personnel Journal. April 1995, v74, n4, pp 75-83.
      Caudron, Shari.  ãBe Cool!  Cultivating a Cool Culture Gives HR A Staffing Boost.ä  Workforce April 1998, pp 50-61.
      Cosenza, Robert and Susan Taylor.  ã10 Thoughts on Employee Retention.ä  HR Focus. Oct. 1997, v74, n10, pp S14.
      Davison, Barbara.  ãSpecial Report:  Strategies for Managing Retention.ä  HR Focus. Oct. 1997, v74, n10, pp S3.
      Denton, Keith.  ãReengineering the Employee Recruitment:  Retain the Best that Remains.ä  Business Forum. Spring-Fall 1997, v22, n2-3, pp 13-18.
      Dolan, Kerry.  ãWhen Money Isnât Enough.ä  Forbes. Nov. 18, 1996, v158, pp 164-171.
      Dutton, Gail.  ãNurturing Employees and the Bottom Line.ä  HR Focus. Sept. 1997, v74, n9, pp 1-4.
      Dutton, Gail. ãThe Re-Enchantment of Work.ä  Management Review. Feb. 1998, v87, n2, pp 51-55.
      Ettorre, Barbara.  ãEmployee Retention: Keeping the Cream.ä  HR Focus.   May 1997, v74, n5, pp 1-3.
      Fyock, Catherine.  ãUnretirement:  A Golden Opportunity.ä  HR Focus.  Jan. 1998, pp 15.
      Harari, Oren.  ãAttracting the Best Minds.ä  Management Review.  April 1998, v 87, n4, p23-27.
      Harkins, Philip.  ãAMEP = Four-step Strategy for Retaining Employees.ä Supplement to the October 1998 Workforce. Oct. 1998, pp 1.
      Harkins, Philip.  ãWhy Employees Stay - Or Go.ä  Workforce. Oct. 1998, pp 74-78.
      Herman, Roger.  ãReducing Costly Employee Turnover.ä  HR Focus.  June 1997, v74, n6, pp 15-16.
      McMorrow, John. ãTalent Alliance: Learning for Longevity.ä HR Focus. Sept. 1998, pp S15.
      Messmer, Max.  ãMentoring:  Building Your Companyâs Intellectual Capital.ä HR Focus. September 1998, pp S11-S12.
      Stum, David.  ãFive Ingredients for an Employee Retention Formula.ä HR Focus. Sept. 1998, pp S9-S10.
      ãThe Network Discusses:  Overtime Pay, Retention Incentives, and Bonuses and Other Perks.ä  Compensation and Benefits Review. July-Aug. 1997, v29, n4, pp 30-36.
      Workforce/E-span Survey. Workforce. June 1998, pp 49.

       

      Career Center - PD Article - Benefits

      Making the Most of Your Benefits Package 

      by Ginger Atwood

      A common mistake women often make is not taking full advantage of all of the company benefits that you are offered. You should know what is available and, whenever possible, take advantage of these opportunities to make your life easier and maximize your pay. Common benefits that should be evaluated include life insurance, retirement, disability, educational assistance, and other benefits.

      Life Insurance

      Most companies offer life insurance. Accept any insurance that is paid for by the company. However, before you automatically accept a company policy, compare it to an independent policy. Young and middle age women can frequently get a policy at a cost significantly below a group plan. When I first started working, I took a life insurance policy with the utility where I worked. I later found I was paying five times the rate I could have gotten on the open market. The company policy was prices based on having a lot of workers in high-risk jobs (such as lineman). Their pool insurance costs made the insurance a good deal for employees in their 50s and 60s but a poor deal for younger employees particularly women.

      Retirement Plan Understand how your retirement plan is calculated. Follow any changes proposed by the company. Most retirement plans are either "Defined Contribution" or "Defined Benefit" plans. Defined contribution plans put a fixed amount in every year and calculate your retirement based on what it is worth at the time you retire. Defined benefit plans use a formula to say what you get when you retire at a certain age. Defined contribution plans are good for young and middle age workers who switch jobs a lot. Defined benefit plans are good for middle age and older workers and workers who plan to stay at the same job for a long time.

      Many companies are considering switching from Defined Benefit plans to Defined Contribution plans. For some long-term employees, their retirement can be significantly reduced based on this conversion. Pay attention to any special notices you receive about your retirement plan. I had one past employer not contribute anything for three years to the retirement plan because of over-performance of assets. I recently received a notice from a past employer who planned to divert tens of millions of dollars from the pension policy to pay retirees medical benefits. What they did not say was that this money was planned to offset an additional company contribution for medical costs. Fortunately, this was legally challenged and the plan was stopped.

      Vesting

      If you plan to switch jobs, be knowledgeable about when you vest. Use your own records to cross check the date you vest. A friend of mine was told she was vested when she was considering leaving her company. As she was walking out the door, they told her that she was vested at the beginning of her anniversary month for the purpose of company contributions in her 401k but vested in the retirement plan on the exact anniversary of her departure date. She left two weeks before her retirement plan vesting. Also, a relative of mine left an Internet startup six weeks before he was eligible for an additional chunk of stock options that have since skyrocketed. In both of these cases, a little more knowledge would have allowed these individuals to delay their departure and take full advantage of vesting.

      401K

      Put every penny you can spare into a 401k if there is a company match. Even if there is not, putting the money into a 401(k) can significantly reduce your taxes and be a painless way to partially save for retirement. It is generally a bad idea to put your 401(k) into company stock. If the company falls on hard times, both your job and retirement savings are in jeopardy.

      Disability Insurance

      Consider taking Long Term Disability if you do not have your own policy. You are more likely to face disability than death, so Long Term Disability is generally a good idea. Consider your level of savings and the cost of the policy when deciding whether you want to take short-term disability. If the benefits are small and limited, you may be better off keeping enough money to live on until your Long Term Policy kicks in rather than buying a short-term policy.

      Medical/Dental Coverage

      One catastrophic illness can cost your life savings in medical bills. You need medical insurance. However, if you are covered by two policies (for example, yours and a spouse's) be aware that most policies now have clauses that prevent you from collecting more than the cost of the bill. For example, if both policies pay 75%, the primary policy will pay 75% and the secondary will pay 25%. This will make the cost benefit of the second policy higher than you may be willing to pay. If your policy includes glasses every two years, get a new pair.Ê You can always use a pair of prescription sunglasses. Consider using a medical saving account.

      Other Benefits  

      Look in your employee brochure and find out what other benefits you are eligible for. Also, ask around and check with your supervisor. Not all benefits are spelled out in the employee handbook. Examples of other benefits are outlined below:

      • Take advantage of any educational assistance programs that are offered. Check into whether your company will let you adjust your schedule to accommodate classes.
      • Subsidized childcare or onsite day care is a very popular benefit. Do not forget to take advantage of this benefit if it is available.
      • Many companies are becoming more receptive to letting employees work flexible schedules or partially work at home. An every other Friday off schedule can allow you to spend more time with your family or accomplish chores that cannot be done on the weekend.
      • Look into whether your company will allow paid time for community service or professional activities. Many of my friends are able to get their company to pay their salary while they attend the National SWE Convention and/or to pay travel expenses.
      • If your company will not let you keep frequent flier miles from business trips, see if they will let you use them on professional activities (such as the Regional Conference).
      • See if your company will pay for training that will enhance both your current value to them and your future employability.
      • Some companies offer legal advice plans, discounts on local activities, or free tickets to local events. Take advantage of these whenever possible. Remember, that it is your right to take full advantage of your company benefit package.  

      SWE Mailing Lists

      What is a List Serv or Mailing List?

      A mailing list is basically a collection of e-mail addresses linked to a single "list" e-mail address. When an individual sends e-mail to the list address (known as posting a message to the list) the message is sent to everyone who has subscribed to the list. This allows for everyone on the list (and therefore has an interest in the topic) to receive e-mail anonymously without exposing their current e-mail address to the world, at least until they respond back to the list with a posting of their own.

      The process of adding your name to the list of e-mail addresses is called subscribing to the list. When you make a request to join a list your e-mail address is added to the list and you start receiving messages people send to the list. If you wish to stop receiving messages you must unsubscribe from the list (have your address removed from the list).

      Lists have two key attributes: who can post to the list, and who can subscribe to the list.

      Lists can be used for multiple purposes, some of which may restrict posting and subscribing. SWE lists normally comprise one or more of the following uses:

      • Contact E-mailing Lists for SWE Leaders – In this case a list, which is maintained by a chairperson (or designate), contains the e-mail addresses of committee members or participants. Rather than each participant having to keep track of the current list composition and current e-mail addresses for individuals, all group correspondence can be sent to the list for distribution. These lists are normally closed to outside subscribers, but may allow posting to the list by anyone if the purpose of the list is to gather outside comment or input.

      • Conversational Lists - This is a traditional use of a list serv in which a group of individuals send e-mails to the list of voluntary participants who have subscribed to the list. As e-mail volume has increased, use of lists in this manner has become less effective. An alternative to such a list is a web-based threaded group or "Discussion Board". SWE has implemented Discussion Board capabilities as an alternative to generating the large volumes of e-mail that this type of list typically creates. For additional information on Discussion Boards, please click here.

      • Announcement Lists – The most common use of a list serv is one in which members voluntarily subscribe to the list in order to receive an occasional newsletter or informational update. Generally these lists are closed to non-subscriber posting or can be moderated by the list owner to make sure SPAM is not posted to the list. Sometimes, an Announcement List may be posted to ONLY by the list owner or designated list members.

      • No list should be used to distribute documents or files to large numbers of users. SWE, at its discretion, will provide other web-based solutions for providing access to documents that are to be distributed to large numbers of users.

      How do I join a mailing list?

      The SWE mailing lists are managed using list serv software. You interact with the list serv software by sending commands to the SWE e-mail address, listmanager@swe.org. The command to join a list is known as the subscribe command. The e-mail should have a blank subject line and must have only the following in the body of the e-mail:

      subscribe {listname} {subscribername}

      where {listname} is the name of the list to which you want to subscribe and {subscribername} is your name (for example, Jane Doe.) Note that regardless of the subscribername entered, you will ONLY BE SUBSCRIBED FOR THE E-MAIL ADDRESS THE MESSAGE COMES FROM.

      Some other list serv software packages allow you to specify the e-mail address as part of the subscribe command; SWE's list serv does not support this to reduce the likelihood that SPAMMERs will subscribe and post unwanted messages to the list.

      How do I get myself removed from a mailing list?

      Getting yourself removed from a SWE mailing list is called unsubscribing. As you did when you subscribed, you send an e-mail to the listmanager@swe.org. In order to unsubscribe successfully, you MUST send this e-mail from the same account that you used when you subscribed to the list. The e-mail should have a blank subject line and must have only the following in the body of the e-mail:

      unsubscribe {listname}

      where {listname} is the name of the list from which you wish to unsubscribe.

      The list serv will send you an e-mail confirming a successful unsubscribe.

      How do I remove myself from a mailing list if I subscribed using an alias (under the previous list serv system) or no longer have access to the e-mail account I subscribed under?

      Send an e-mail to owner-{listname}@swe.org (where {listname} is the name of the list in question) requesting that you be unsubscribed and specifying the e-mail address that is to be removed.

      I tried to remove myself from a mailing list and got a message with the subject line "Unsuccessful Unsubscribe".

      This message means the list serv software was unable to match the e-mail address you sent your unsubscribe request from to an e-mail address existing in the list serv. This can occur for several reasons. First, you may have originally subscribed from one e-mail address but attempted to unsubscribe from another -- for example, if you originally subscribed from your company e-mail but tried to unsubscribe by sending an e-mail from a personal account. In this instance you will want to reattempt your unsubscribe command from your other e-mail account. A second reason may be because you originally subscribed using an alias or an e-mail account to which you no longer have access. If this second scenario is the case, send an e-mail to owner-{listname}@swe.org requesting that you be unsubscribed and specifying the e-mail address that is to be removed.

      How do I find out if I'm on a mailing list?

      The simplest way to determine whether you are subscribed to a list is to attempt to unsubscribe yourself. If you successfully unsubscribe and wish to stay on the list, 

      simply add yourself back in with the subscribe procedures above. Keep in mind that you could be on the list with a different e-mail address than you tried to unsubscribe from.

      How do I send a message to the mailing list?

      To send a message to a list simply address your e-mail to {listname}@swe.org where {listname} is the name of the list.

      It is good netiquette to sign your e-mail messages and list your e-mail address at the end of the message so list readers can easily respond to your message.

      How do I get additional help as a list user?

      • Send a message to listmanager@swe.org. In the body of the message type only the word "help" without quotation marks to receive a return e-mail with a short summary of commands and procedures.

      • Contact owner-{listname}@swe.org where {listname} is the list you have questions about. This mail will go to a real person who is the list owner and can tell you more about the purpose of the list as well as assist you with basic list commands.

      • If you do not receive a response from the list owner, send an e-mail to listadmin@swe.org who may be able to assist you.

      What are the basic protocols for using a list serv?

      When you post to a list, put your name and e-mail address at the bottom of your message so that others may reach you privately if they need to.

      Be careful to send subscribe and unsubscribe messages to the proper e-mail address, listmanager@swe.org, not the list serv e-mail address itself! If you are having trouble understanding how to subscribe or unsubscribe, contact the list owner at owner-{listname}@swe.org where {listname} is the name of the list you're having trouble with. This e-mail will go to a real person who can assist you.

      Keep to the topic of the list so the number of messages posted to the list remains manageable.

      If you change e-mail addresses, don't forget to unsubscribe your old e-mail address from any lists you might have joined.

      On occasion you may post a message to the list and get back a message saying the e-mail could not be delivered to a specific individual. This is a bounced message and typically happens when a subscriber changes her e-mail adress but forgets to unsubscribe from the list. If this happens, simply forward the bounced e-mail to the list owner at owner-{listname}@swe.org where {listname} is the name of the list you had posted to. The list owner can then remove the problem e-mail address from the subscription list.

      What are the SWE Terms and Conditions for list serv use?

      SWE List Servs: Terms and Conditions

      Introduction

      A list serv provides an automated way to communicate with large numbers of individuals quickly and hold discussions among many people. List serv mailing lists are provided to the Society of Women Engineers community as a means of sharing information and holding discussions on issues of importance to women engineers and the profession. List serv lists are available to SWE groups provided the following requirements are met:

      • Lists must serve a purpose associated with the mission of SWE.
      • Lists must not duplicate an existing list.
      • Lists must have an owner who can provide adequate information regarding the purpose of the list and support individuals' interaction with the list (i.e. for issues regarding subscribing, unsubscribing, posting, etc…)
      • Lists must conform with all email policies.
      • Lists must use shared SWE resources responsibly.

      Authorized List Owners

      A list owner must be a SWE member in good standing with a valid email account to receive questions and administrative notices.

      List Owner Responsibilities

      • Monitor day-to-day activities of the list.
      • Acquire knowledge and skills required for list administration and maintenance by reading the list administrator documentation and FAQs.
      • Identify and solve subscriber problems.
      • Provide adequate information regarding the purpose of the list and the people for whom list participation is designed.
      • Respond to questions regarding the list's use, content, and routine functions such as subscribing and unsubscribing.
      • Unsubscribe subscribers through the web interface when requested by the subscriber.
      • Set individual list policies, and communicate and enforce rules so the list may successfully serve its purpose.
      • Maintain list features such as the welcome message, help, header and trailer messages.
      • Monitor the list for appropriate use.
      • Respond to requests from the SWE Headquarters List Administrator at listadmin@swe.org.
      • Contact the SWE Headquarters List Administrator at listadmin@swe.org to report unresolved list serv issues and potential violations of SWE list serv policy.
      • Stay informed about list serv policies.
      • Agree not to load and subscribe users from databases.
      • Agree list subscription is voluntary and anonymous to all but the list owner.

      Transfer of Ownership

      The SWE Headquarters List Administrator (listadmin@swe.org) must be contacted directly by the original list owner regarding the transfer of list ownership. The List Administrator will remove orphaned lists (lists with no list owner).

      Authorized List Subscribers

      List subscribers may include any individual approved by the list owner, including individuals who are not members of SWE. The list subscriber should have a relevant association with the purpose of the list.

      List Subscriber Responsibilities

      List membership is not a right of the individual. List owners reserve the right to unsubscribe list members who abuse the list by sending inappropriate mailings. List owners are responsible for determining what constitutes inappropriate mailings.

      Unacceptable Use of Lists

      • Any illegal purpose or discussion.
      • Sending off-topic e-mail.
      • Sending abusive or offensive mailings to the list serv.
      • Sending large attachments to a list serv with many subscribers.
      • Under no circumstances can a list be used to participate in or promote activities that would reflect poorly on or cause harm to the Society of Women Engineers.

      Lists are not confidential. The List Administrator reserves the right to remove any poorly managed or improperly used lists. The List Administrator will periodically review lists for activity and conformance to list server policies. Lists that are inactive or that fail to conform to policies will be removed. No list archives of postings to lists will be made available.

      Creation of New List Servs

      Requests to create new lists should be submitted via email to the SWE Headquarters List Administrator at listadmin@swe.org. New list requests are subject to approval by the List Serv Administrator and the Executive Director of the Society of Women Engineers.

      Credit goes to Meredith College Technology Services for the basis of this document.

      What do I do to request creation of a new list serv?

      Requests to create new lists should be submitted via email to the SWE Headquarters List Administrator at listadmin@swe.org

      I am a list owner (administrator). Is there additional information available to help me administer my list?

      SWE List Serv Administrator FAQ

      To become familiar with typical tasks and settings a list owner needs to know, please see the Quick Start List Serv Guide. Comprehensive information on SWE list servs is also available as "Help" for administrators. Please contact listadmin@swe.org for additional assistance

      SWE Email Aliases

      What is a SWE e-mail alias?

      A SWE e-mail alias is an e-mail address created for the swe.org domain (that is ending in @swe.org). This e-mail address automatically forwards all mail to a designated e-mail account. The alias is NOT an e-mail account that can be logged into to review e-mail but simply a pointer to a real e-mail account where message review is possible. As an example, if Jane Doe requests an alias, SWE will create a jane.doe@swe.org e-mail alias and point it to Jane's real e-mail account at jane.doe@yahoo.com. All e-mails received for jane.doe@swe.org will then automatically forward to jane.doe@yahoo.com.

      Why would I use an e-mail alias?

      There are two principal advantages to using an e-mail alias. First, you can provide your collegues, friends, and family with your swe.org e-mail address. Should you change jobs or your personal internet service provider, you simply notify the SWE Alias Administrator of the new e-mail address to which your alias should point, rather than having to notify everyone that your e-mail address has changed. Secondly, using a SWE alias is a great way to show your commitment to the Society of Women Engineers and create awareness for the organization.

      Who can use a SWE e-mail alias and for what purposes?

      SWE creates aliases for two general purposes:

      A single "Personal" Alias will be created and maintained for no charge upon the request of any current SWE member as a member benefit. This provides the member with a permanent e-mail address that does not have to change regardless of whether a member’s underlying e-mail address changes due to a change in Internet service providers or company e-mail addresses.

      Because swe.org aliases generally utilize a consistent firstname.lastname@swe.org format, ease of communication and identity recognition between members is increased.

      SWE also may provide "Special Purpose" Aliases to individuals, groups (including regions and sections), and parties related to or volunteering for SWE. These special purpose swe.org aliases are especially valuable for volunteers who may need to pass the alias on to a future volunteer or for volunteers who will be publicly posting the e-mail address on a web site and therefore may be subject to discovery by SPAMMERs.

      What are the terms and conditions for using SWE Aliases?

      SWE Aliases Terms and Conditions

      Introduction

      An alias is an e-mail address created for the swe.org domain (that is ending in @swe.org). This e-mail address automatically forwards all mail to a designated e-mail account. The alias is NOT an e-mail account that can be logged into to review e-mail but simply a pointer to a real e-mail account where message review is possible. SWE creates aliases for two general purposes:

      A single "Personal" Alias will be created and maintained for no charge upon the request of any current SWE member as a member benefit. This provides the member with a permanent e-mail address that does not have to change regardless of whether a member’s underlying e-mail address changes due to a change in Internet service providers or company e-mail addresses.

      Because swe.org aliases generally utilize a consistent firstname.lastname@swe.org format, ease of communication and identity recognition between members is increased.

      SWE further recognizes that member use of a swe.org address increases the visibility and awareness of the Society of Women Engineers outside of the organization.

      SWE also may provide "Special Purpose" Aliases to individuals, groups (including regions and sections), and parties related to or volunteering for SWE. These special purpose swe.org aliases are especially valuable for volunteers who may need to pass the alias on to a future volunteer or for volunteers who will be publicly posting the e-mail address on a web site and therefore may be subject to discovery by SPAMMERs.

      SWE Alias Policies and Procedures

      • Only one Personal Alias will be issued.

      • Personal Aliases will be created in the form firstname.lastname@swe.org. Members may request that the first name be their commonly used name at the time of setup. For example, Judith.Doe may be setup up as Judy.Doe. Similarly, members who prefer to be known by a professional last name or maiden name can normally be accommodated.

      • Name changes (for example, due to marriage or divorce) will be handled as follows: upon request, a new alias reflecting the name change will be created. Members should immediately begin contacting parties using the old alias. The original alias will remain active for a period of 180 days and will be deactivated thereafter.

      • Members may request deactivation of an alias at any time.

      • Members may request redirection of the alias to another e-mail address at any time. Typical turnaround is 3-5 business days and is subject to verification of the request’s authenticity.

      • Personal aliases should never be posted on a web site as contact information or provided to any untrusted 3rd parties; your alias may become the target of SPAM as a result of electronically registering a product, signing up for product updates or otherwise opting in to an e-mail list. SWE is not responsible for stopping SPAM generated by your use of your e-mail alias nor will SWE provide you with a replacement personal alias.

      • Personal Aliases are for SWE members. A personal alias will be deactivated if membership lapses.

      • All aliases are provided at the sole discretion of the Society of Women Engineers, which reserves the right to deactivate an alias at any time. Possible reasons for deactivation include but are not limited to:

      Unsolicited E-Mail. Engaging in SPAM generation related activities. Posting of irrelevant messages to newsgroups or blanket posting of messages to multiple newsgroups, or distributing chain letters or "junk" e-mail or unsolicited e-mail of a business or commercial nature.

      Mail Bombing/Flaming/Harassing E-mail. Malicious impediments to another person’s use of their electronic mail services or news media by sending them e-mail numerous times in succession (e.g. Mail Bombing). Any mail that is sent to another that is annoying, harassing, threatening, or otherwise malicious.

      Fraudulent E-Mail. Forging any message header, in part or whole, originating or passing through the Society of Women Engineers electronic systems.

      Aliases are subject to approval by the Alias Administrator and the Executive Director of the Society of Women Engineers.

       

      How is my SWE e-mail alias related to the e-mail addresses in my Membership Profile?

      Your SWE e-mail alias is not associated with your SWE Membership Profile. That is, if you make a change to your Membership Profile e-mail address, the e-mail address to which your alias points will not automatically update. Conversely, if you request your alias be updated to forward to a new address, this will not automatically change any e-mail addresses in your Membership Profile. Please use the link below to request an update to where your alias points, and remember to update your Membership Profile as necessary as well. If you wish, you can use your alias as your preferred e-mail address in your Membership Profile.

      How do I request a personal SWE e-mail alias if I've never had one before?

      Request creation of a SWE email alias

      How do I change the underlying e-mail address that my existing SWE alias forwards to?

      Please send an e-mail to aliasadmin@swe.org, in order to request an update to the e-mail address to which your alias points. Please include your name, your alias, your old e-mail address, and the new e-mail address your alias should forward to. If appropriate, please update your Membership Profile to reflect your new e-mail address as well.

      My name has changed. How do I get a new personal alias to reflect that name change?

      Please send an email to aliasadmin@swe.org, in order to request a renamed alias. Include your name (first and last) that will be used to rename the alias as well as your old e-mail alias and the e-mail address to which your renamed alias should point. Please be sure to update your Membership Profile to reflect your name change as well as any e-mail address changes as appropriate. Please see the Terms and Conditions for additional information on transitioning from one alias to another after a name change.

      How do I request a special use SWE alias?

      Request creation of a SWE special purpose alias

      How do I have an alias deleted?

      Please send an e-mail to aliasadmin@swe.org, in order to request deletion of a SWE e-mail alias. Include your name (first and last) as well as the alias name to be deleted and an e-mail address we can reach you at if we have any questions.

               

      Life Membership

      Life membership in the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) is an investment which benefits both you and SWE. 

      Simply make the required contribution to the SWE Endowment Fund Inc. - Headquarters Account, and life membership privileges can be yours. 

      Contributions remain permanently in the SWE Endowment Fund Inc. - Headquarters Account which is administered by the Board of Trustees.  The principal of the fund remains intact; annual interest is used to further SWE's goals. 

      Why you should consider a life membership in SWE: 

      • Life membership in SWE carries prestige.  Even if you change professions, you will always be recognized as an engineer.

      • Once your life membership contract is paid (you can take as long as 5 years, if you wish), your SWE dues are waived.

      • Your influence will live on and help other women engineers long after you are able to help directly.

      • Your life membership annually will generate more income for SWE than would be derived from annual dues.

      • Income from your life membership provides a stable financial foundation for the Society.

      • Any future dues increases will not affect you.

      Membership Information

      Obtain a copy of a Life Membership Contract, review the payment options, fill out the form, and return it to SWE. 

      You will be expected to make a contribution of $2,000 to the SWE Endowment Fund Inc. - Headquarters Account. This contribution is payable in cash, stocks or other assets equivalent to $2,000. The contribution can be paid at the time the contract is signed, or in 3 year installments.  However, if you select an extended plan, you must continue to pay annual dues until your contract is fulfilled. Once you have fulfilled the contract, life membership privileges become yours. 

      The SWE Endowment Fund Inc. - Headquarters Account is qualified as tax exempt under section 501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Tax Code. If you have any questions, check with your accountant on the deductibility of your contribution under the current laws. 

      If you are already a life member of SWE, you might want to provide inspiration and lend encouragement to a younger member by contributing a life membership to one who may not yet have become financially established in the profession. 

      It would be an especially appropriate gift for the young graduate engineer who needs the continuity of a strong support group. 

      BECOME A LIFE MEMBER TODAY!

          

      SWE Statement on SPAM

      SPAM is an Internet-wide issue for personal and professional e-mail systems, hitting record numbers in volume. AOL has reported it was blocking over 1 billion unwanted e-mail messages PER DAY, and SPAM volume continues to increase. The impact SPAM has is enormous: it takes time to delete, is a distraction from reading important e-mail, takes up network resources to store the e-mail messages and bandwidth to receive, deliver and bounce messages, and it can be offensive.

      Headquarters Efforts Completed to Date

      Unfortunately there is no single method or software to detect and eliminate all SPAM from the normal flow of e-mail communication. SWE approaches the problem from a number of directions to filter those communications that are clearly not legitimate. Among the techniques currently used are:

      Connection Filtering

      Real-time Blackhole Lists (RBL) are third party services that include domain names and IP addresses of known spammers. SWE currently uses four separate providers of these lists and removes e-mail before delivery if the e-mail sender is listed by three of the four RBL’s.

      Content Filtering

      Bayesian statistical filters use SPAM’s characteristics against itself. Words in messages are analyzed based on how frequently they appear in good e-mail versus bad e-mail. Then the message is assigned a probability of being SPAM. When a probability threshold is reached, the message is redirected and deleted.

      Phrase Filtering searches for phrases in the body of the messages. Lists are updated periodically to capture the latest internet fads and scams.

      Blacklist URLs Filtering searches for known SPAMMER web site addresses that appear in SPAM messages (most SPAM e-mails contain a call to action to visit a web page and these URLs can be detected and the message deleted).

      Relay Prevention

      SWE has implemented technology to prevent the mail system from being used as a relay by junk mailers to launch their junk mail - often making it look like the source of the SPAM is SWE.

      List Serv Lockdowns

      SWE has provided an easy-to-use list serv interface for list serv administrators, and this interface includes options which make it more difficult for SPAMMERs to reach individuals through list servs. List management features (valid poster lists) can be defined by SWE list owners through a web interface. SWE has removed the ability to request the list of SWE list servs or a list of members on a list serv. This makes it more difficult to hijack and abuse list servs.

      Virus Sniffing

      SWE offers basic virus protection to reduce the chance that messages containing common viruses, which might damage recipient systems or utilize them as SPAM generators, are deleted before delivery. As with any virus solution, it is not fool proof and users of SWE services should maintain local up-to-date virus protection on their machines and systems.

      E-mail Publishing Best Practices

      Where ever possible, e-mail addresses, including aliases and list servs, are published on the web site in the members-only portion of the web site as appropriate. By limiting access to web pages with e-mail addresses, this limits the impact of tools used by SPAMMERs such as crawlers and scrapers which read every accessible page on the site and grab any e-mail addresses within the content.

      We have also developed recommendations for region gatekeepers and section webmasters regarding the use of e-mail addresses in site content.

      What SWE Members Can Do

      Consider setting up an e-mail account specifically to receive SWE e-mail with a system utilizing SPAM filtering technology, such as Yahoo!, Hotmail or AOL.

      If you are utilizing a SWE alias and you would like to point it to a new account using SPAM filtering, please email the Alias Administrator to request an update to your alias.

      If you have subscribed to any list servs (mailing lists) and would like to have those messages delivered to another account, please unsubscribe using your old e-mail address and re-subscribe using the new address. Instructions on this process can be found at SWE Mailing Lists.

      NEVER respond to any SPAM, even to request removal from their distribution list. Making such a request simply confirms your e-mail address is valid and will likely increase the amount of SPAM you receive.

      If you are serving in a volunteer capacity for SWE and need to post a contact e-mail address on a web site to reach you, DO NOT USE A PERSONAL E-MAIL ADDRESS OR PERSONAL SWE ALIAS. Instead, use a generic SWE alias that can be discarded at a later date if the SPAM volume becomes unbearable. You can read about SWE email aliases and request a special use aliases at SWE Email Aliases.

      SWE Headquarters will never be able to block all SPAM but with the technology in place and your help we should be able to limit it substantially.

               

      SWE Virus Statement

      E-mail viruses, worms and trojan horses, as well as fraudulent e-mails are a significant concern to all of us who rely on e-mail for communication. Recent strains of viruses are becoming more sophisticated, both in terms of how they deliver their viruses, worms, etc.. and in how they disguise themselves as legitimate e-mail. To that end, please be aware of the following:

      1. SWE will NEVER e-mail you a FILE ATTACHMENT and tell you that you must click on it to maintain, update, or activate your "account", your e-mail, etc… If you receive an e-mail that looks like it's from SWE with a message such as this and a file attachment, IT IS A VIRUS AND YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY DELETE THE E-MAIL WITHOUT CLICKING ON THE FILE.

      2. All e-mail sent to swe.org addresses that have .zip file attachments will be rejected and will not be delivered to the recipient. Because many new viruses are using the zip file attachment to propagate, we will no longer allow zip files through our mail system. Please send files in native formats such .doc, .xls or .pdf. If you must send a zip file, rename the file extension to .xip and notify the recipient that he or she will need to rename the extension back to .zip prior to attempting to open the file.

      3. Never assume that because you know the sender, an e-mail and/or file attachment is safe from viruses. Mass mailing viruses often work like this:

        Jane opens an infected attachment in an e-mail and her machine becomes infected. This turns Jane's machine into an e-mail broadcast server - the virus goes through Jane's address book, and in latest virus versions, subdirectories on her harddrive and network connections. The virus picks out anything that looks like an e-mail address and generates new copies of the infected e-mail which are sent from Jane's computer. Hundreds of emails can be sent per minute and appear as if they were correspondence between ANY two people listed in the Jane's address book. So if both Sue and Diane are listed in Jane's address book, the infected email may show up in Sue's box as an email from Diane, or it may show up in Diane's box as an email from Sue, or it may show up in Sue's box as an email from Jane, etc….

        As an aside, assume for the moment that Diane has good virus protection and received the infected e-mail generated by Jane but showing Sue's e-mail address as the sender. It is Sue, not Jane who may receive notification that she sent an infected email, even though Jane's machine is really the culprit.

      4. Fraudulent e-mails, also known as spoofing, imposter, or phishing e-mails, are e-mails in which the sender address has been forged so it looks like a legitimate e-mail from a particular organization (such as SWE). These are usually designed to trick you into providing sensitive personal information that can be used for identity theft by having you reply to the e-mail or by sending you to web site link that requests you enter information. It's sometimes hard to detect a fraudulent e-mail. That's because the e-mail address of the sender often seems genuine (such as management@swe.org), as do the design or graphics. To protect yourself, be aware that SWE will never ask you to e-mail your credit card number or sensitive personal information such as your social security number. All credit card transactions with Headquarters should be done via our secure server, via phone, or via fax.

        To further protect yourself from viruses, be sure your computer is running a local virus scanning program and that virus definition files are regularly updated at least once per week. Never open an attachment directly from an email. Always save the attachment to your harddrive or the network first (depending on your organzation's recommendations), then open the file from there. Virus scanning software will not always recognize an infected file as accurately when opened directly in email.

        Lastly, never attempt to open a file that looks suspicious, comes from a completely unknown sender without explanation, or comes from a known sender without explanation. If you're not expecting a file from Jane and you get a message that reads "Here's the file we talked about", assume it's a virus. Contact Jane FIRST to see whether she really sent you a file.

               

      SWE Discussion Groups

      SWE Discussion Groups are essentially electronic bulletin boards where messages can be posted to promote the exchange of information, ideas, and viewpoints from SWE members, and to provide an efficient means for SWE volunteers and groups to conduct SWE-related business.

      To learn more about how SWE Discussion Groups work, please review the frequently asked questions below. To request creation of a new Discussion Board Forum (for example, for a committee or a special interest group), please click here.

      Why would I use a Discussion Group instead of a list serv to communicate?

      Discussion Groups can be an effective alternative to list serv communication for several reasons. First, when utilizing a Discussion Group in place of a list serv, you will virtually eliminate SPAM. List servs addresses that have been posted on web pages and for which there are no posting restrictions will inevitably receive some SPAM. Discussion Groups, by design, allow only SWE members to login to view postings and therefore are not a tool that a spammer can easily exploit.

      A second advantage is the frequency with which you receive legitimate e-mails regarding Discussion Board postings. If you choose not to enter an e-mail address in your profile and not to subscribe to any forums or threads, you will not receive any e-mails at all; you will, however, need to review postings on your own initiative. If you enter an email address and subscribe to forums or threads, you will receive less e-mail because you will only be notified of the first new posting related to your subscription. You will not be notified again until you login and view the forum, beginning the notification process again.

      How do I get to the SWE Discussion Groups?

      Open up a web browser and type www.swe.org/sweforum

      How do I get a username and password?

      If you are a current SWE member, your username and password already exist. They are the same as the username and password you use for the SWE Member Service Center. If you have been invited to join a private discussion group, you may have to login to SWE Discussion Groups at www.swe.org/sweforum to activate your Discussion Group account, then notify the forum administrator so that you can be added to the private forum. (Note that a private forum will not be visible until the forum administrator has made you a member.)

      I forgot my username and password. How do I find out what they are?

      Go to the "Retrieve a lost password" link on the Member Data Services home page.

      What information is maintained in my SWE Discussion Groups Profile?

      Only your first and last names and a "display" name are maintained by default. (Note that we encourage you to use your real name as your display name whenever possible). If you wish to use forum or thread subscription services, or to receive notification of private messages via e-mail, you must enter a valid e-mail address in your profile by selecting the Control Panel/Edit Profile option.

      If I change my profile information for the Discussion Groups, will the changes show up in the SWE MemberService Center?

      No. All information in the Discussion Boards profile is keep separately from your Member Service Center profile. If your name changes or you want to update your e-mail address, you’ll need to edit both your member profile in the Member Service Center and your Discussion Board profile.

      What are SWE Discussion Groups forums?

      Forums are individual discussion groups that are defined either by an area of interest or by a specific group of individuals. As an example, the SWE Council of Representatives has its own forum specifically for use in COR-related business. Individuals may also request creation of a forum for topical issues of interest to general SWE membership. An on-line form is available at the link at the top of this page for requesting creation of a forum.

      What is the difference between private and public forums?

      Public forums are available to all SWE members. Private forums are available only to members who have been granted access by the forum administrator. A private forum would typically be designated as such for working leadership groups such as the COR, whereas public forums would typically be on general areas of interest to many SWE members.

      Are there restrictions on who can post and reply to a forum?

      SWE forums typically allow anyone to post or reply to a forum to which they have access. This means if a forum is public, anyone with a SWE login can post and reply to the forum. If a forum is private, anyone with rights to access that specific forum can post or reply to it but individuals without access rights cannot.

      It is possible for a forum administrator to restrict postings so that only the administrator can post a new thread but others with access to the forum can reply to it. It is also possible for the administrator to require replies by users be approved by the administrator before they appear. A final possible setting is to completely restrict postings and replies to the administrator only, in essence creating an announcement-only forum. If you are having difficulty posting or replying, it may be because these functions are restricted for that particular forum. See Why can’t I reply or start a new topic? below for additional information.

      What is a thread (topic)?

      A thread is an original message along with all posted replies related specifically to that original message. A thread is essentially the equivalent of a conversation between message posters about a specific topic.

      How do I read threads (topics)?

      Once logged in to the Discussion Groups, simply click on the name of a forum to display all available threads (topics) within that forum. Then click on a topic to read postings.

      How do I post a reply to a thread (topic)?

      There are two ways to reply. While reading postings for a topic, you can reply using the "Quick Reply" section at the bottom of the postings page. You can also click the "Post Reply" button, which provides additional functionality such as the ability to attach a file or create a poll.

      How do I start a new thread (topic)?

      Once inside a forum, simply click the "New Topic" button.

      Why can’t I reply or start a new topic?

      Some forums are read only. A padlock on the "New Topic" or "Post Reply" buttons indicates a read only forum.

      I need to find an important posting, but I can’t remember where it is. How can I find it?

      You can search the forums by clicking the "Search" button near the upper right-hand corner of any page. You can also sort a forum’s topics or threads by selecting one of the options in the drop down list next to the New Topic button in the upper left corner of the forum screen. These options include sorting by Topic, Started By, number of Replies, number of Views, and Last Comment.

      What does it mean to subscribe to a forum or thread?

      At the top of a forum or thread is a link that allows you to subscribe or unsubscribe to a specific forum or thread. When you are subscribed to a forum and you have a valid e-mail address in your user profile, you will receive an e-mail from the SWE Discussion Group system when a new posting to that forum is made. Once the SWE Discussion Groups system has notified you of one new posting, it will not notify you of additional new postings until you've logged in and viewed the forum.

      Thread subscriptions are similar to forum subscriptions, however they pertain only to postings made to a specific thread, not to the forum as a whole.

      How do I use the polling option?

      To use the polling option you must click the New Topic button within a forum and click the checkbox for Post a poll with your forum post. After you click the submit button you will be prompted for the poll question and up to 6 possible responses. The polling feature within the Discussion Groups system is to be used only for straw polling and not for official SWE voting.

      What is Private Messaging?

      Private messaging allows users to send each other messages that are not visible as part of a topic. You will receive notification via e-mail when you receive a private message only if you enter an e-mail address in your Discussion Groups Profile. To send a private message, click on Private Message in the upper left corner, hit the New PM tab, and click the Lookup User hyperlink to find the individual you want to send the message to. Note that the list is in alpha order by first, not last, name. To read a private message click on the Inbox hyperlink in the Private Message area.

      What should I do if I see an inappropriate posting?

      Please report any inappropriate postings to the forum administrator. In an emergency, the SWE Discussion Groups system administrator may be reached by e-mailing discussiongroupadmin@swe.org. Remember that messages posted to the SWE Discussion Groups will be read by other people. Please think before you post.

      What are the Terms and Conditions for using the SWE Discussion Groups?


      SWE Discussion Groups: Terms and Conditions

      Introduction

      Society of Women Engineers (SWE) Discussion Groups have been established to promote the exchange of information, ideas, and viewpoints from the diverse array of SWE members and to provide an efficient means for SWE volunteers and groups to conduct SWE-related business. Although security for SWE

      Discussion Groups exists (it can be accessed only by logging in as a SWE member), participants and administrators should treat forum discourse just as they would a public meeting -- as if discussions and documents posted in a forum could be copied and re-posted in a publicly accessible location.

      Messages posted to SWE Discussion Groups by SWE members are solely the opinion and responsibility of the person posting the message and are not confidential. SWE is not responsible for messages posted by SWE members. Individuals are responsible for their own posts.

      SWE retains the right to temporarily or permanently close any Discussion Group Forum at any time. The SWE Discussion Group Administrator will periodically review forums for activity and conformance to policies. Forums that are inactive or that fail to conform to policy rules will be removed.

      Forum Administrators

      Each Discussion Group Forum with the exception of the Announcements and General Chat Forums, must have a volunteer administrator. The administrator must have a valid email account to receive questions and perform administrative tasks.

      Forum Administrator Responsibilities

      • Enter and maintain a valid email address in her Discussion Group profile.

      • Monitor and moderate the forum on a day-to-day basis for appropriate use per current Discussion Group Policies.

      • Acquire knowledge and skills required for forum administration and maintenance by reading the Administrator FAQ and Online help as needed.

      • Identify and solve participant posting problems.

      • Respond to questions regarding forum’s use, content and routine functions.

      • Perform individual forum policy-setting, communicating and enforcing rules so that the forum may successfully serve its purpose.

      Transfer of Ownership

      he SWE Headquarters Discussion Group Administrator (discussiongroupadmin@swe.org) must be contacted by the original forum owner regarding the transfer of forum administrative tasks to another person. Orphaned forums (forums with no active administrator) will be deactivated.

      Unacceptable Use of Forums

      The following types of postings are cause for immediate post removal, warning, or an individual’s suspension from the site. Other inappropriate postings not listed below may also warrant removal and/or suspension from the site. SWE reserves the right to remove any post without warning or further notice.

      • Posting contact information about another individual.

      • Posting material containing profanity, vulgarity, or hate speech.

      • Posting material threatening, harassing, stalking, abusive, or otherwise in violation of the legal rights (including rights of privacy and publicity) of others.

      • Posting defamatory, infringing, obscene or other unlawful material or information.

      • Posting material (graphic or text) that is obscene, pornographic or adult in nature.

      • Using JavaScript, active or other coding, making repetitive posts, or other actions that interfere with site operations.

      • Posting material with the intent to impersonate SWE staff or a SWE member through the use of similar IDs or any other method or device.

      • Encouraging others to violate SWE policies.

      • Advertising job postings, merchandise, auctions, services or commercial web sites, including offers to trade, or charitable solicitations.

      • Refusing to follow SWE staff instruction or direction.

      • "Wanted" posts, or posting solicitations of interest in the sale of an item or service.

      • Inappropriate threads started in the wrong discussion group forum

      • Only persons aged 18 or over may post to the boards, without regard to whether an adult actually owns the registration or parental/guardian permission.

      • Posting copyrighted items without the permission of the copyright owner.

      Creation of New Forums

      Requests to create new forums should be submitted via the Discussion Board request form, which can be found at https://www.swe.org/MSC-SWE/memberforms/forumrequest.aspx. New forum requests are subject to approval by the Discussion Board Administrator and the Executive Director of the Society of Women Engineers.

       

       

      I'm a Forum Administrator. Is there an Administrator FAQ?


      SWE Discussion Groups Administrator FAQ

      This FAQ is intended to provide answers to the most basic administrative tasks associated with dotNetBB SWE Discussion Groups. We encourage forum administrators to first become familiar with the SWE Discussion Groups User FAQ. Administrators must enter and maintain a valid e-mail address in their Discussion Board Profiles. Please follow the instructions in the User FAQ to enter a valid e-mail address.

      The "dotNetBB Administration Panel" is a powerful tool, which, if used improperly, could cause severe problems. If there are any questions about completing tasks that are not specified in this FAQ, please send an e-mail to discussiongroupadmin@swe.org.

      How do I get to the Admin tools?

      Log into the SWE Discussion Groups at www.swe.org/sweforum. If you have administrator rights, you will see an "Admin" button in the upper left of the screen. Click on it to get to the Admin tools.

      How do I add users to a private forum?

      On the Administration Panel under Forum Tools, click on "Private Forum Access". Click on the Edit Members link of the private forum you want to edit. Then specify the users who should have access to this forum by moving the individuals from the left box to the right box. (Highlight the user and click on the >> button to move the user to the right box.)

      If someone you want to add to a private forum is not already set up as a SWE Discussion Board user, they will first need to log in (which will set up their discussion group account based on their SWE member service center profile.) After that has been completed, you can then log in and access the admin features to add them to the private forum.

      How do I clean up stale postings?

      On the Administration Panel, click on "Thread Pruning". Specify the oldest posting age in days, choose the forum to prune, and click "Go". Please be very careful when using this tool as deleted postings cannot be recovered. Note that it is not possible to indicate specific threads to be pruned.

      What are Sticky Threads?

      'Sticky Threads' are thread messages that are locked to the top of the forum, preceding all other posts regardless of the last post date. Click on "Sticky Thread in the Administration Panel. Select your forum and click Go. Then select an existing thread to make it "Sticky" or to "Unstick" a thread.

      SWE encourages all forum administrators to create a sticky thread containing basic information regarding the forum, such as the purpose or topic and intended audience as well as a contact e-mail address for the forum administrator.

      How do I move a thread?

      Occasionally users may start a thread in an inappropriate forum. You may move such a thread from one forum to another, provided you have administrator rights to both forums. To do this, click on the Move a Thread link on the Administration Panel. For assistance moving a thread to a forum for which you do not have administrator rights, please send an e-mail to discussiongroupadmin@swe.org.

      How do I censor offensive words?

      If you find that offensive words are being used, you can censor them using "Word Censoring". On the Administration Panel, click "Word Censoring". Specify the word to be censored and enter the replacement text. Keep in mind that the Word Censor automatically does partial matches. For example, entering the word "dog" in the filter would also catch and replace the first three letters of the word "dogma".

      How do I control offending users?

      Please notify SWE Headquarters of offending users by sending an e-mail to discussiongroupadmin@swe.org.

      How do I stop a discussion that’s out of control?

      From time to time, discussions will meander so far from the original subject that they need to be stopped by the administrator. Please notify discussiongroupadmin@swe.org if you feel a forum or a thread needs to be locked.

      How do I clean up Orphan Attachments?

      On the Administration Panel, click "Attachment Editor". This tool is designed to assist in attachment maintenance. Since forum members cannot remove attachments from their posts, regular maintenance may be necessary. Occasionally attachments will become orphaned when a member uploads a file, but does not complete their post message. These orphans are totaled in the first section titled "Orphan Attachments". You can delete these orphans by clicking on the delete button.

      What do I do if I have further questions?

      You can access the help files by clicking "Help" on the button near the upper right-hand corner of any page. If the help files do not answer your question, click the link that says "Need Support?" at the bottom of any page to send an e-mail to the discussion groups system administrator, or email discussiongroupadmin@swe.org.

       

               

      MEMBER - Directory Update

      SWE Online Directory FAQ

      SWE has recently updated the Online Member Directory to include new functionality. These frequently asked questions describe the latest features. Should you have additional questions on directory usage, please email hq@swe.org.

      How have the search criteria features changed in the SWE Online Member Directory?

      Several additional fields have been added to enhance the search experience:

      • To provide SWE members who travel internationally with a better mechanism for networking with SWE members temporarily or permanently located outside the U.S., we have added a Country drop down field.

      • A new Section field is now available which allows for text entry of Section Codes (i.e. A001, B059, etc…) Because this is a text field instead of a drop down selection, the wild card character % can be utilized. This will be especially useful when searching for all Members At Large (use the criteria “%049”) or when searching for individuals in a specific region rather than a specific section (use the criteria “A%” to return all Region A individuals).

      • On the lower left search criteria there are now two new “Leadership” oriented search fields. These two fields, used either together or singly, provide the ability to search for Section, Region and National SWE leaders.

      The Leadership Position drop down displays a variety of positions within the organization ranging from Section President to Region Governor to specific committee chairs and board members. If you wish to search, for example, for all COR Representatives, simply select that option from the drop down list. When searching on Leadership Position, keep in mind the following special circumstances.

      • There are four distinct positions you may wish to search for related to COR Representatives. These positions are Alternate COR Representative, COR Representative, COR Deputy Speaker and COR Speaker.

      • When searching for individuals on specific committees, you’ll want to do two separate searches – one on the “Chair” position and one on the “Member” position – in order to pull together a comprehensive list.

      • The Leadership Position field can be used in conjunction with other search criteria, such as the Section text box. For example, to pull a list of all Region A Section Presidents select Section Presidents from the Leadership Position drop down and enter A% in the Section text box. Use the Member Category field to select either only Professional or Student Section Presidents if you wish to further restrict the search.

      The Leadership Group drop down displays a variety of groupings within the organization ranging from specific sections to specific regions to National Committee Chairs, Board of Trustees, and Board of Directors. If you wish to search for the entire Board of Directors, simply select that option from the drop down list rather than searching for each BOD Leadership Position separately. When searching on Leadership Group, keep in mind the following special circumstances:

      • To simplify the search process, all committees which draw their membership from all regions of SWE are considered “National Committees”. National Committees therefore include Task Forces, Special Committees, Miscellaneous Committees, and National Committees as defined elsewhere.

      • Region leadership groups consist only of leadership at the region, not the section level, therefore selecting Region A as the Leadership Group will return the Region Governor, the Region’s Student COR Representative, and the Region’s Student Coordinator but not Section Presidents, Treasurers and the like.

      How have the Search Results Changed in the Online Directory?

      Search results now contain an additional column for Current Leadership Positions. (You may need to scroll to the right to see this column.) The column reflects the positions a given individual holds for the current fiscal year.

      We’ve also added the ability to see historic leadership service on an individual’s detailed profile. To review a specific member’s SWE service, simply click on the individual’s hyperlinked name and view the Leadership Positions area of the web page. This historical information currently reflects fiscal year 2003 and forward; in the near future we will be populating the system with additional service records.

      Many column headings are now hyperlinked to provide both ascending and descending sorting of the returned data set.

      What else has changed in the Online Directory?

      Security protocols have been further strengthened. Should you forget your User ID or Password, you can still use an automated process to help you gain access to the directory. We now, however, email your User ID along with a specially encrypted url which allows you to reset your password. By using this methodology we have eliminated the need to send your password in a plain text email. In addition, we’ve strengthened password requirements; should you choose to change your password it is now required to have both upper and lower case letters as well as at least one numeral, and must be 8 characters long. Brut force password guessing is prevented by “locking” an account for a period of time after three unsuccessful login attempts.

      Another change is the implementation of style sheets which allow us to more closely match the look and feel of the Member Service Center to that of the SWE web site as a whole.

      You’ll also notice the addition of a new hyperlink in the lower left area of the Search Criteria screen. This new link, Edit My Profile!, takes you straight to your member profile where you can update your contact information, education and work experience, or provide SWE with valuable data on why you are a member, so that we can continue to communicate with you effectively and provide the member benefits you desire.

      Are there new features for SWE Leadership?

      Yes! The on-line directory previously included special download rights for those in specific leadership roles. With this release of the directory we have greatly expanded the file formats which can be downloaded to, and provided alternate data outputs containing just the information a leader might need to prepare a mailing or send an eblast. Individuals in leadership positions will see a series of drop downs immediately below the search results. The first of these drop downs defines the leadership role you wish to utilize while downloading your information – an asterisked role indicates that you have download rights. The second drop down provides a list of data output options ranging from the Original Directory Format to All Preferred Contact Information or simply an individual’s name and email address in the Preferred Email Address format. The third drop down provides a variety of file formats include Microsoft Excel, Tab Delimited, Comma/Quote Delimited and XML. Once these three fields are entered as desired and you’ve run your search, simply click on the Download button and save your file for use outside the directory. SWE leadership who utilize the directory agree to abide by individual members’ privacy wishes and use the data in accordance with the stated privacy and usage policy posted on the Directory page.

      Who should I contact if I have additional questions about the SWE Online Member Directory?

      Please contact SWE Headquarters at hq@swe.org or call us at 312.596.5223.

               

      Career Center - PD Article - Start Own

      Are You Ready to Start Your Own Company?

      by Ginger Atwood

      There are many factors to consider before deciding to start your own business. Currently women are starting new businesses at twice the rate of men and own nearly 40% of all firms in the United States. Common reasons to own your own business include flexibility, ability to do things your way, getting rewarded for hard work, and bypassing glass ceiling limitations. This column provides advice based on my experience with two startups in the last ten years.

      Before starting a business, make sure you have covered the following areas:

      • Marketable skills, experience and credentials: A successful engineering company sells the talents, skills, experience, and credentials of its owners and employees as its product. Make sure you have a marketable combination before starting a company. Perform informal surveys of your potential customers and find out what competition exists. Make sure that you are able to distinguish yourself from existing companies.
      • Business Planning: Before you commit to startup a company, develop a business plan.
      • Questions to consider include:
        • Who are your customers and what is your market niche?
        • Why will they hire you?
        • Where will you be located?
        • What are your rates and how do they compare to the competition?
        • What type of company are you forming (i.e. sole proprietorship, partnership, C corporation, S corporation)?
        • What types of benefits will you offer and how do they fit into your rate structure?
        • How will you finance the business?

      There are many good books available on business planning that go into more detail of what should be considered.

      • Initial Capitalization and Financing: Make sure you have access to enough cash to pay company and living expenses for at least the first year. If you need capital to run your business, line up financing. Remember that even after you win the contract and perform a service, it may be several months until you get paid.
      • Business and marketing skills: All companies need to maintain books, collect accounts due, pay taxes, and market. Make sure you have the skills in your company or can hire someone to assume these duties. There are several good software packages on the market that let you do the majority of bookkeeping and billing and use a specialist only when needed. Every small business needs its owners and employees to be able to market. You need to be comfortable selling others on your capabilities if you plan to start your own business.
      • Know what needs to be done to make the business succeed: Contrary to popular belief, owning your own business involves more work up front than being an employee of a corporation. As a startup, you may have to work late and weekends to help out a critical client. If you are not willing to put in this effort and deal with this uncertainty, then starting a business may not be for you. You may be required to deal with paperwork requirements that take you away from the billable business. You may also have to travel more than you would like.

      If you decide that you are going ahead with the business, here are some common pitfalls to avoid:

      • An incredible amount of paperwork is required if you use the word ãengineeringä in your company name. In addition, at least one owner must be a registered professional engineer. This is why many startup companies formed by engineers use other terms such as technology in their company name.
      • If you are undercapitalized, you may starve for cash when you get slow paying clients. You can sometimes make special arrangements for quick pay as a startup small business. Do not put too much money into things that are not needed for company success. Fancy office space and unnecessary equipment may cripple your initial cash flow.
      •  Sometimes there is dissent among partners on the direction that the company should go and how the business should be run. It is best to work these details out up front if possible. I left the first startup I was involved in after a year and a half when our senior partner, ãTony Billabilityä, wanted the company to make legal and financial decisions that I considered questionable.
      • Once the company is started, you must support its commitments. You may have to turn down promising job offers because you have commitments to the company and to clients that would not be fair to back out on. I have canceled vacations and worked on the floor of airports to meet client deadlines.
      • Every business has to be marketed. I usually carry business cards and brochures in case a marketing opportunity arises. I sometimes have to force myself to follow through on business leads. You can provide the best service in the world and you wonât stay in business if no one knows about it.
      • Don't be a one-client business. If you devote all of your attention to one client, you may find yourself without any work when that client is on a down business cycle. I know a business owner who turned down several other clients and canceled a vacation to help his main client through a poor planning initiated crisis. The project was pulled out on schedule and under budget and the deliverables received positive reviews. Two weeks later, they cut his contract in favor of a friend of the boss.
      One good source of information for starting your own business is the Womenâs Business Ownership page. It can be found at www.sba.gov/womeninbusiness/. This page has helpful articles and advice and links to funding sources.

       

      Career Center - PD Article - Big Girls

      Big Girls Do Cry But Not At Work

      by Ginger Atwood

      Most working women share a fear of losing control and crying at work. While crying is expected for extreme situations (i.e. breaking an arm, or a death in the family), it is considered taboo for professional women in response to normal work situations. We have all seen men lose their temper at work (remember that anger is an emotion), however, nothing reinforces the negative stereotype of women being ruled by emotions rather than professionalism like a crying woman professional. Here are some tips to minimize this concern.

      • Anticipate and rehearse difficult situations in advance
      • Terminate any situation if you are losing control
      • Disassociate what is said from what is meant
      • Learn your crying triggers and break them
      • Have a recovery plan

      If you know that a difficult situation is coming up, mentally rehearsing will help you keep control. Anticipate possible hard spots and the best way to react to the different directions that the situation can take. In some cases, it is good to take reinforcements into a difficult meeting to give you moral support. For example, I once had to lay off a man who had worked for the company for fifteen years and who did not believe that he could be affected in a layoff. My company prohibited me from giving him any advanced warning that this was a possibility. I was able to correctly anticipate that he would react with anger and was able to deal with his anger and frustration and provide him information to ease his reaction. I also had a second person with me when he received the news since I correctly anticipated that he might react explosively.

      When you feel yourself losing control, excuse yourself, terminate the meeting, and go to a location where you can regain control. This sudden departure is usually interpreted as a way to deal with anger rather than an attempt to avoid crying. Strangely, leaving to "control your anger," particularly if you do not have a reputation for flying off the handle, enhances rather than weakens your professional reputation. I have left a meeting with a statement like, "We will have to continue this discussion later when we have all had a chance to cool down." Later I overheard positive comments about my being particularly hard nosed on the issues we were discussing.

      When you feel you are being attacked in a meeting, try to disassociate what is being said from why it is being said. Sometimes, if you know what motivates the other person, you can be more objective about what is said and not take insults personally.

      Find out what breaks your crying trigger. I know women who swear that you cannot cry and drink ice water at the same time. I know others who pinch themselves surreptitiously under the table to break the trigger. I have to get out of the room if someone starts asking if I am upset because the question itself is likely to trigger a cry from me.

      If you are vulnerable to crying, keep a "crying kit" in your office. It should include a mirror, Kleenex, makeup, eye drops, and other comfort items. The mirror can be a pocket mirror or a small mirror on the back of your office door. It will tell you when you no longer look like you have been crying and can safely venture out into the office. Even if you don't normally wear makeup, makeup helps cover up crying blotches or complexion reddening due to upset. Early in my career I worked for a "boss from hell" who regularly tore into his employees, I kept one of those small glass jars that sample jams come in (with a diameter about the size of a nickel) filled with foundation for just such an occasion. If your eyes get red when you get upset, you may want to invest in a bottle of "get the red out" eye drops. I also kept a small bottle of my favorite perfume and hand cream to cheer me up while I regained control.

      While you are upset, call or meet with a friend for moral support. Do not confront the people who upset you or put anything in writing while you are upset. I usually try to wait until the next day to make sure that I cannot be accused of reacting emotionally. If all else fails, consider taking an early lunch, or the morning or afternoon off to regain control.

      • Remember the following tips to help you deal with the potential for crying at work:
      • Anticipate and rehearse difficult situations in advance
      • Terminate any situation if you are losing control
      • Disassociate what is said from what is meant
      • Learn your crying triggers and break them
      • Have a recovery plan.

      Contact the Author: Ginger Atwood ginger.atwood@swe.org  

      Career Center - PD Education and Licensing

      FE and PE Exam Preparation, Licensing and Continuing Education

      Engineering is one of society's most important professions. With a professional license, you demonstrate your commitment to high standards as well as to the protection of public health, safety, and welfare. Earning the distinction of professional engineer (P.E.) can lead to better job opportunities, increased pay, and much more. The following are the steps you must take to become licensed:

      Step 1
      Graduate from an accredited engineering program.

      Step 2
      Take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam to earn the Engineering Intern (EI) or Engineer-in-Training (EIT) credential. Success rates are higher for those who take the exam right out of college. Learn how to prepare for the FE.

      Step 3
      Get four years of engineering experience. Requirements for the type of experience vary by jurisdiction.

      Step 4
      Take the Principles and Practice of Engineering (PE) exam. Upon successful completion you will be granted licensure and the designation of "professional engineer" (P.E.). Learn how to prepare for the PE.


      Once you are licensed, you must take professional development courses in order to renew your license. Requirements may vary by jurisdiction.

      FE and PE Exam Preparation

      17244-1.gif

      Kaplan AEC Education

      Through a strategic partnership with Kaplan AEC Education, SWE members can receive a 20% discount on all exam preparation materials for the Fundamentals of Engineering exam (FE) and Principles and Practice of Engineering exam (PE) the two exams necessary to become a licensed engineer.

      Kaplan is the leader in standardized test preparation, and has been for nearly 70 years. Kaplan AEC Education, part of the Kaplan Professional division, is dedicated to exam preparation for Engineering, Architecture and Contracting licensure.

      Professional licensure in Engineering will provide you:

      Greater career opportunities

      A competitive advantage in the job market

      Higher salaries with the PE license

      Freedom to have a portable license, open a private practice, enter into contracts and more.

      To take advantage of this special 20% SWE discount on exam prep materials, visit www.swe.org/kaplan.

      17244-2.gifKaplan AEC Education

      SWE members save $50 (one-time only) off all Kaplan GMAT, GRE, LSAT, MCAT, SAT, or TOEFL classroom courses, premium online courses, or private tutoring programs. Visit www.kaptest.com/swe or call 1-800-KAP-TEST to enroll and use promotional code SWE50.

      Additional FE and PE Exam Preparation Resources

      FE and PE Exam Prep Links
      http://www.ncees.org/exams/study_materials/#fe

       

      http://www.amazon.com/Environmental-Engineering-FE-Exam-Preparation/dp/1419503499

       

      http://www.ppi2pass.com/ppi/PPIInfo_pg_myppi-faqs-prepare.html

       

      http://peonline.asme.org/

      Licensing

      Licensing Information Links

      http://www.engineeringlicense.com/

      Continuing Education

      Continuing Eduction Links

      http://www.iacee.org/

       

      http://www.pdhengineer.com/state_requirements.htm

       

      http://www.asce.org/conted/

       

      http://www.redvector.com/

      SWE's Career Insights

      SWE's Career Insights

      SWE's Career Insights Podcasts bring SWE to you in a portable, audio format that fits your busy "on the go" lifestyle.

      Podcasts are audio programs, sometimes accompanied by images, slides, or video that you can listen to at your convenience on your computer or download to a portable digital music player (an MP3 player, like an iPod).

      Check back often as we build our audio library of career advancement advice and tips, discussions on work-life balance, and other professional and personal development topics.

      Subscribe to the Series!

      With iTunes

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      Career Center - PD Article - Right Grad

      Choosing the Right Graduate School Program for Part-Time Students

      By Diane L. Peters, P.E.

      When someone is deciding on graduate school, there are some things that every student must look at. He or she needs to figure out which schools have the desired programs, how good their classes and instructors are, and how to pay for tuition. For the part-time student, there are a few additional considerations that need to be taken into account before settling on a school.

      First of all, someone might wonder, why become a part-time student? Obviously, it takes longer to finish the program that way. There could be many reasons for this. A woman raising children may not wish to take a full load of classes, or a person who is working may not be able to take a leave of absence to be a full-time student. The reasons will vary from one person to another.

      The first choice to make, then, is what kind of schedule does a person have, and how can the schools under consideration accommodate this? One person may have a job where she has a flexible schedule, and can take classes that fall into a wide time range. Others may have a more rigid work schedule, and only be able to take evening classes. The woman raising children may need to coordinate her schedule with a spouse, day-care provider, or friend. If a school offers only a few classes during the evenings, this will make it much more difficult for some people, and needs to be considered.

      Second, where are the schools located? Most students going away to a four-year university for their first degree are willing and able to move to another city or even another state. A part-time graduate student, however, will generally have other commitments in life that will limit the choice of schools to a certain geographic area. While some schools may not be located close to either a person’s home or workplace, they may have satellite classrooms in the community at which a person could take most of their coursework. Distance learning is also an option. While it has been around for a long time, in the form of correspondence courses and video classes, the Internet has added new capabilities to this option and made it more attractive to many people.

      If the school does have an off-campus site, or a distance learning program, how often would a student have to travel to the main campus? For some programs, the first time a student would set foot on the campus would be graduation. For others, it may be necessary to come to the campus to meet with an advisor, take a particular lab class, register, or purchase books. If it is necessary to come to campus, what times would a person have to come, and how would this fit into their schedule?

      Another consideration may be whether or not the school allows students to take a leave of absence from the program or skip a semester’s coursework. Some schools have no problems with this, while others require that students must take classes every semester in order to remain in the program.

      Having identified all these questions, how does a prospective student answer them? First of all, you can use those SWE connections! Many SWE members have received either a technical masters’ degree or an MBA as a part-time student, and most are happy to talk to others about their experiences. If you ask the SWE members in your area, they may know of someone who went to the school you’re considering and could answer your questions.

      If you can’t find a SWE member who can help you, check out the schools on the Web, and find contact information for the department chair of the program you’re interested in. Most schools are always looking for talented students, and would be happy to tell you all about their programs. While they will, of course, present their school in the best light, you can get a lot of information just by asking the right questions.

      If you can’t find any school in your area, then you might want to look at the long-distance programs offered by schools in other areas of the country. This will take more time to research, since it opens up the list of schools to investigate tremendously, but it also opens up a lot of options to you. Again, SWE members can be a valuable resource for investigating the schools. If there is a section in the area where the school is located, the section’s officers may be able to help put you in touch with members who have gone through the programs you’re looking at.

      With all the options for graduate school, more and more people should find a program that fits their needs and desires. We all know that learning can’t ever be over, if we want to be successful, and part-time study is a great way to learn new skills when a person either cannot or does not want to go back to school full-time. Choosing the right program will allow a person to get the most out of it, with the fewest logistic headaches.

      Career Center - PD Article - Reentry Workforce

      Focus On: Re-Entry Into the Engineering Workforce

      By Karen Herbert
      Society of Women Engineers

      In 1999, the Society of Women Engineers Board of Directors funded a survey of employers hoping to gain information that would aid experienced women engineers re-enter the workforce. The Survey for Women Engineers Re-Entering the Workforce included rankings of skills and abilities that are valued by employers, how employers meet women's family obligations, and background information on each company. Kristin Stuby, of the Lehigh Valley Section, conducted the survey of 55 area companies.

      To complement this information from employers, I recently surveyed women engineers who are currently out of the engineering workforce or who have returned to work after a hiatus. Out of 24 respondents, half were not working, and half were back in the workforce. Over half left work to raise a family. The average time out was 5 years, with most respondents between 2 and 10 years. Of the 12 not currently employed, 6 plan to work in engineering again, 2 do not, with another 4 unsure.

      The companies surveyed in 1999 rated skills and abilities. Below are the average ratings (with 1 being most important and 9 being least important) along with the percentages indicating whether women respondents improved, stayed the same, or fell behind during the career interruption.

       Skills and Abilities
      Employer Rating
      Improved
      Stayed the Same
      Fell Behind
       Technical & Engineering Knowledge
      2.3
      12%
      37%
      50%
       Ability to communicate with colleagues
      3.6
      37%
      58%
      4%
       Ability to get along with other people 3.7
      67%
      33%
      0%
       Computer competency 4.6
      33%
      37%
      29%
       Management and organization skills 5.0
      67%
      29%
      8%
       Technical writing skills 5.4
      21%
      67%
      12%
       Work group leadership
      5.5
      33%
      50%
      12%
       Ability to communicate with the public
      6.2
      54%
      42%
      0%
       Teaching skills
      7.5
      75%
      17%
      4%

      Also rated were several avenues to engineering knowledge. Below are the average ratings (with 5 being most important and 1 being least important) along with the percentage of the women respondents who fulfilled each requirement.

       Avenues to Engineering Knowledge
      Employer Rating
      Applies to Respondents
       4 or more years of experienced 3.8
      100%
       Professional development courses
      3.2
      50%
       PE license
      2.8
      29%
       Post-graduate courses/degree in engineering
      2.8
      54%
       Post-graduate courses/degree in business
      2.5 25%
       Part-time employment or consulting
      2.3
      42%
       Volunteer service to engineering profession
      2.1
      37%
       Volunteer service to the community 1.8
      67%


      Another section of the employer survey asked companies to identify workplace options offered to enhance productivity and morale. The following table shows the percentage of companies that offer or might offer each workplace option with the percentage of respondents who marked that option as making re-entry easier.

       Workplace Options
      Employers
      Offering Now
      Employers
      Might Consider

      Would Make
      Re-Entry Easier

       Flextime

      53%
      23%
      50%
       Comp Time 36%
      25%
      25%
       Part-time positions
      32%
      45%
      75%
       Compressed work week
      9%
      38% 21%
       Telecommuting
      8%
      23%
      50%
       Job-sharing
      4%
      36% 54%
       On-site child care
      0%
      9%
      42%

       

      Strategies for Re-Entry

      Update your skills
      Not surprisingly, employers rated technical and engineering knowledge the most important ability in a re-entry candidate. However, most respondents either stayed the same or fell behind in technical knowledge.

      Take the time to find out what technical and computer skills are now used by engineers in your field. Network with previous colleagues, SWE members, and professionals in technical organizations, and determine what you need to be competitive. Even if your skills are current, you will be facing some negative attitudes. A course or two might help show that you are up to speed. Many respondents used their break to complete or begin a graduate degree.

      It may not be appealing to think about going back to the classroom, but you are investing in the continuation of your career. And if you are going to invest in education and training, get it in a field where there is urgent need.(1) You may want to consider biotechnology, information technology, or industrial/operations research. If your path is heading toward additional college courses, you may qualify for the SWE Re-Entry scholarship!

      Both SWE and technical organizations like the American Institute of Chemical Engineers offer professional development courses. You learn from experts in a condensed format. Costs (with travel & lodging) may be high, but compare that with your long-term goal of re-entering engineering.

      Consider Contracting
      Talk to the engineering contracting firms in your area. Manpower(r) has a technical division in many cities. You may be able to find a firm that specializes in part-time or flexible schedules. Working for companies on a short-term basis will give you the current experience you need.

      Two of the survey respondents are in business themselves doing contract engineering work. With the trend toward outsourcing, you may be able to find more opportunities than you think.

      Prepare to Rebuild
      Don't be surprised if you need to take a step backward when getting back into the workforce.(2) Once you are in your field again, you should be able to quickly regain lost ground by showcasing your skills.(1) One respondent noted, "It's better to be underemployed, than unemployed." Another wrote, "I was offered an entry level job because management was not sure how well I would 'pick things up' since I was out so long (6 yrs). It took only 6 months for me to advance to the next level."

      If you expect to start a rung or two lower, be sure to research salaries in your industry. Depending on the length of your break, starting salaries may have climbed over what you had been earning and you need to know "market value."

      To combat the negative perception of being out of the workforce, you might also consider a "stepping stone" job, even if you have been busy volunteering. Using volunteer experience when returning to work is a popular myth. (1) Companies don't take volunteer work seriously - as evidenced by the low survey rank.

      So if you are not having any success getting back into engineering, you might look for another job in a related technical field - quality control, technical writing, computer programming.

      Find the Right Company
      Women engineers who are mothers should look for a company that is "family friendly." Making the transition back to work will be stressful and a company that is sensitive to working parents is key. One respondent stated, "I am lucky to have found an engineering job with a flexible, family-friendly company."

      Again, use your network to find out about company policies and attitudes. Research companies through the internet and local business publications. When you interview, pay attention to any talk of family or displays of photos to help you judge the climate.

      Stay Confident
      Faced with the obstacles of re-entry, you may not feel very confident in your abilities. In fact, 50% of the survey respondents expect to encounter negative attitudes and 29% expect that their previous experience won't be recognized. Planning ahead and considering all the above factors should help you present yourself well during interviews. "While unemployed, I really questioned my loss of skills and didn't know that I 'hadn't lost it' until I returned to work and found the transition quite easy," one respondent noted.

      According to the companies surveyed, the qualifications that distinguish re-entrants from entry-level women are experience, stability, communication skills, maturity, and responsibility. Remember that you were once a productive employee and you can certainly be so again.

      Keeping part of your professional life during your break may help you feel secure in your engineering identity.(4) Continue to network and read about your industry in technical journals or the internet.(3)Attend meetings and conferences. Carving out a little piece of your hectic life for engineering should make the transition to work smoother.

       

      Summary of Additional Data from Re-Entry

      24 Respondents, 13 with advanced degrees

      Year of first degree
      1970's 7
      1980's 15
      1990's 2

      Years out of workforce
      <1 year   2
      1-3 yrs   9
      4-10 yrs  9
      10+ yrs 2

      Reasons for Leaving:
      (16) Raise family
      (7) Downsized from job
      (4) Spouse/Partner relocation
      (4) Needed break

      (3) Entered graduate school
      (1) Changed career path
      Obstacles expected or experienced:
      (12) Negative perception of the break in employment
      (9) Outdated skills
      (8) Lack of engineering opportunity in the area
      (7) Industry downturn
      (7) Lack of networking contacts
      (7) Previous experience not recognized
      (2) No obstacles
      Others mentioned: decreased self-confidence, lack of part-time opportunities, lack of child care, inability to travel, husband's relocations

      If not returning to engineering, why not?
      (2) Content with family responsibilities
      (2) Negative experiences
      Other factors: no longer interested in engineering, too many obstacles, pay not commensurate with responsibilities and workload, desired more flexibility

      During the break:
      (17) Raising family
      (11) Volunteer work
      (8) Non-technical employment
      (6) Part-time engineering position
      (2) Info technology
      Other: job search, graduate school, moving, sales

      What is your plan for re-entry?
      (10) Full-time employment
      (8) Part-time/Flex schedule
      (6) Not sure
      (3) Complete graduate degree
      (2) Academia
      (2) Start own business

      Do you regret leaving work?

      (4) Yes
      (16) No
      (4) Both yes and no

      Quotes from the survey:
      "No, it was a wonderful time to realize that other things are very important in my life besides work."
      "Yes, for losing ground on my career. No, for letting my children know they mean the world to me."
      "Yes. I probably made the right decision with regard to my children. Yet, there isn't a day that goes by that I don't miss my career and my paycheck."
      "No, my family is first. I love all the contacts and various community activities that I was able to grow with and support."

      What problems have you faced re-entering the workforce?
      "Time and not having an internal mentor. I had to walk blindly for the first two years in a big company.
      When the kids had something special, I didn't feel like I could/should take time off to be with them."
      "It is very frustrating to be unable to find a job when there is supposed to be a labor shortage out there."
      "It is possible to re-enter the workforce, but you may have to be patient and persistent about obtaining increasing levels of responsibility."  

       

      References:

      1. "Yes you can go back to work" Jeff Blyskal, Good Housekeeping March 1997
      2. "Re-entering the Workforce" Sylvia Ho, ivillage Job Resource Center
      3. "How to Land a Job no, whether you are starting out or starting over" Lesley Alderman, Money June 1995
      4. "Cracking It! Helping Women to Succeed in Science, Engineering, and Technology" Josephine Warrior

       

       

      Career Center - Pd Article - PE exam

      Preparing for the P.E. Exam

      by Christina Luebbert, P.E.

      Preparing for the Professional Engineer Principles and Practice Exam (P.E.) is a task that is often dreaded, but also often necessary. Many jobs require licensure to advance in both salary and responsibility. The purpose of this article is to give some practical advice from those of us who have "been there and done that".

      Everyone asks, "How much time should I allow for studying?" This is a very personal choice. It is dependent on your particular learning style, the type of work you have been doing, your life situation and your tolerance to failure. If, like me, you don't tend to retain information very long-term and feel like anything beyond about two months would end up having to be restudied, you might consider some brief overview until two months prior to the exam. I had been in a consulting job where I did a wide variety of work and had a good background in diverse subjects. This prepared me better than some of my more specialist counterparts. I was also fortunate to have a husband who supported this effort and we had no children. I highly recommend this life situation for taking this exam as he took up a lot of slack in our household and I can't imagine trying to study with an infant. It can be done, but it was nice to only have to focus on one thing at a time. I do not have much tolerance for failure and didn't want to just go in and take it to see what it was like, as some engineers do. I was committed to doing whatever it took to pass on the first try.

      So now you have decided how much time you are going to devote to this endeavor. The next important factor to success is the dedication of specific chunks of time to work problems and study. I studied after work for 3-4 hours Monday through Thursday and 5-6 hours on Saturday and Sunday for the two months prior to the exam. I focused best in the mornings of the weekends, so I studied from the time I got up until lunch and then another hour or so after lunch. I then gave myself the rest of the day to forget about it and relax. During the week, I studied in the conference room of our office where I could spread my books out and be alone. There was less temptation to procrastinate if I simply stayed at work and made studying part of my job. Again, this is a very personal choice based on your best working conditions.

      There are certain materials you will need to begin studying. You want to have pencils and erasers, possibly your engineer's scale or other discipline-specific tools and the calculator(s) you will be taking to the exam. You need to check with your licensing board as to what is allowed as far as calculators. My state said "no word processing capabilities". Other states have other rules. Depending on your discipline, you will also need to obtain a reference manual. The Civil Engineering Reference Manual (CERM) and its solutions manual was invaluable to me as I both prepared for and took the exam. I recently found a web site by the reference manual's publisher (ppi2pass.com) that has a great discussion board for getting help and receiving some moral support.

      Now for studying strategy: there seems to be a consensus that you should determine which areas of your discipline you are proficient in. These could be things that you have either taken many classes in, or had worked with in your job, or both. In these areas, review what kinds of problems might appear on the exam to be familiar with the format. After spending a fairly short period of time on them, move on to the subjects that you feel you could become stronger in with a moderate amount of review. This is the part of the review that consumes the most time. After reviewing the theory in these areas, work problems until you feel confident that you could work them on the exam.  

      The final portion of the study will depend on the time you have. It includes the subjects that you had few, if any, classes in and have never worked with. These subjects are not in the areas of engineering that you were most interested in, and would take the most review time if you were to be able to work problems in them. You might intend to avoid working these types of problems, but spend a little time on these areas just in case there were not enough problems you are comfortable with.

      If you find yourself behind, and need to catch up, one way to do it is by only setting up your practice problems. You can take it for granted that if the assumptions, methods, and equations are correct, then there is no need to work the problem through. By saving time on the arithmetic, you can do many more practice problems.This is where a solutions manual is helpful because it usually shows the method and you can check how you did without getting the final answer.

      During the last week before the exam or along the way, spend some time choosing the books that you will take. At the actual test, you will see some people with so many books that they cannot carry them, and some who only brought one or two books. Neither approach is optimal, since with many books you spend far too much time searching for the right one, and no one book contains everything you will need. You might select books in two groups. The first group of books you know you will use a lot. The second group includes some more specialized books and advanced texts on a few subjects. You may not be sure if you will need them or not, but if you do, it would be for one specific problem and no other. At the actual test site, I placed them in two different stacks, with the first group closer and easier to reach.  

      It probably goes without saying that you need to study hard for this exam. You might also prepare by making sure you get a good night's sleep and have a light breakfast before the exam. Also remember to have fresh batteries in your calculator and extra lead for your pencil. A good eraser is also invaluable.

      At the actual test, take a deep breath and try to keep it all in perspective. It is a nerve racking experience for most, but it will be over in eight hours and you can go on with life after it is over (although you will run to the mailbox for about 3-4 months waiting for the results). I suggest skimming through all the problems and identifying the groups that you think you want to work. If there is one that you know you can answer very solid, I would suggest starting with that because it gives you some confidence. Then work as steady as you can.

      The format of the test has now changed to all multiple choice for most areas. You will have to answer four sets of ten questions in the morning and another in the afternoon. The questions within a set will generally be about the same area of study, but will not always be about the same problem. Do what you can to narrow down the answers. But remember that whether the question requires long calculation or a straightforward answer, it is still worth only one point.

      In the end, only you can judge the best way for you to prepare for the exam. Take a deep breath and a little prayer never hurts. Good luck!

      Special thanks to Diane Peters, P.E. for her ideas and contributions to this article.

       

      Career Center - PD Article - Managing Life

      Managing Your Life Records

      by Ginger Atwood

      Common Sense work principles need to extend to all aspects of life. It is important to take the time to periodically verify that your important life records are accurate. Consider the following tips:

      • Re-verify any information that may have been manually converted from paper records to computer records in the past few years.
      • Check your social security records periodically for accuracy.
      • Double-check your mortgage company,s escrow records against your own.
      • Pay close attention to charge card records.
      • Check your medical benefits before accepting a denial of claim or making additional payments to a doctor.
      • Check your pension records and know how they are calculated.
      • Check your insurance to make sure that your actual coverage is correct.
      • Check your investments and pensions to ensure that the correct beneficiaries are identified.

      The following examples illustrate the importance of applying these tips.

      Computerized Records

      Recently, my application to take the Professional Engineering exam was rejected because they were told that I did not have an Engineering degree. Although I had taken the standard precaution of checking my transcript for accuracy after graduation, my University had converted from paper record to computer record at some time in the last 20 years. The University made a keying error that assigned the wrong degree code so that sometime in the last two decades my BS turned into a BA.

      Once the problem was identified, I was able to get it corrected immediately. However, I have to wonder if this misinformation affected my career over the last few years when I supplied sealed transcripts for jobs, graduate school, etc. Take the time to re-verify any important personal information that has been manually converted from paper records to computer records. Any institutional records created before the mid-1980s are highly likely to have been manually converted to database form. 

      Social Security

      My husband checked his social security records and found that a past employer had not paid his social security tax for over a year. We had to send the original W2,s to Social Security because they were so old that they were too faded to copy. The problem was eventually corrected. I also recently discovered that the total social security withholding shown on my last check from my previous employer was less than the sum of the monthly social security withholdings for the year. Check your social security records periodically for accuracy periodically to find out what was actually paid and match the withholding on your check to what was reported on your W2.

      Escrow Accounts

      My mortgage company was charging a late fee to my account every time I made a payment before the first of the month since they erroneously believed that the checks were for the previous month (even though they were correctly labeled). This particular company was also paying my taxes late and charging the escrow account for the late fee. When I made extra payments on the mortgage, this same company applied it to the escrow account rather than to the principle. While this company got into trouble with these practices. It is smart to double-check your mortgage company to make sure that your payments and escrow account are being handled appropriately.

      Charge Card Payments

      A few months ago I noticed that the amount credited for my charge card payment and taken from my bank account was different from the amount on my payment check. This underpayment triggered interest and penalties. Most major credit card payments made by check are processed through the credit card company not your bank. If there is an error, you are the only one who will be able to catch it and get it corrected.

      Medical Benefits

      Last year, I had several medical claims denied that were covered according to my medical plan. They were all paid in full after I showed evidence of coverage from the plan. I also had doctors who were paid in full send me bills for additional charges in hopes that I would pay them without checking. Check your medical benefits before accepting a denial of claim or making additional payments to a doctor.  

      Pension Records

      Check your pension records to make sure that they are correct. Know how your pension is calculated. I have a friend that found that his time of service after a lengthy career was recorded as a year and a half short of his actual service. He also found that his salary of record reported was lower than his actual salary. After investigation, he discovered that his employer did not count the amounts put into his 401k as income. He found that he was better off not making 401k contributions for the last three years before his retirement. Luckily he discovered these issues and had them corrected before he retired.

      Insurance Coverage

      For the last few years, I have had a running battle with my insurance company. The same company also covers my in-laws and about once a year, I have to get corrections made to my policies. For example, I continually find my father-in-law listed as a driver on my car policy even though he has his own car, his own policy, and his own address. I also find that changes that they make to their policies periodically creep onto my policies.  

      Beneficiary Check

      For any investments, life insurance policies, pensions, etc. Periodically check your beneficiary of record. My father recently found out that the school district he works for had a person that he did not even know listed as his beneficiary. If something had happened to him before this error was discovered, it could have significantly delayed receipt of needed benefits.

      Consider taking the following actions to verify the accuracy of important life records.

      • Re-verify any information that may have been manually converted from paper records to computer records in the past few years.
      • Check your social security records periodically for accuracy.
      • Double check your mortgage company,s records against your own.
      • Pay close attention to your charge card records. - Check your medical benefits before accepting a denial of claim or making additional payments to a doctor.
      • Check your pension records and know how they are calculated.
      • Check your insurance to make sure that your actual coverage is correct.

      Check your investments and pensions to ensure that the correct beneficiaries are identified.

      Contact the Author: Ginger Atwood ginger.atwood@swe.org  

       

      MEMBER - List Servs FAQs

      SWE List Serv Transition FAQ for Administrators

      What's changing?

      SWE list servs are moving from Majordomo to Ipswitch Imail, which provides an enhanced level of functionality.

      What are the major advantages of the change?

      • Imail provides an easy-to-use web-based interface for administration of each list. Although it still accepts user e-mail messages to allow automated requests for list subscriptions and removal from lists, all administrative tasks can be controlled through the web console at http://swemail.swe.org/IAdmin.

      • Imail provides SPAM protection through several state-of-the-art methods. Only a single method was employed formerly when SWE was on shared server space.

      You can read a new FAQ about SWE anti-SPAM and anti-Virus protection measures and recommendations at www.swe.org/spam.

      What additional measures related to SPAM should list administrators be aware of?

      • Make sure the list configuration item "Disable List Command" is left checked. All lists have been transferred with this status turned on. If this feature is NOT checked, any subscriber can obtain a list of the users subscribed to a list by issuing a "listname" command to the listmanager@swe.org. A spammer could load this into a database and generate unsolicited e-mail directly to list subscribers.

      • Do not advertise the actual list serv e-mail address on a publicly accessible web page unless absolutely necessary. SWE has now made information about lists available only after members have logged into the Member Service Center. We are working with section and region web page owners where this information is posted to have it removed from their sites and instead reference the Member ServiceCenter page. We have also disabled the e-mail command that allows a listing of all available SWE list servs. While we encourage disseminating information about the existence of lists to interested parties through e-mail, electronic or hardcopy newsletters, etc., we strongly discourage the publication of list serv addresses on unprotected web pages. Web pages can be scanned and SPAMMERs can harvest list names through automated software.

      • There are several ways to utilize a list as described in the list administrator documentation. We have converted all but a few lists to allow posts only by subscribers, in order to reduce SPAM. This means that a user who subscribes from her company e-mail address will have a posting rejected if it is posted from her yahoo.com address. We believe the SPAM reduction offered by this change warrants any inconvenience this may cause to legitimate list users, as users can always subscribe from more than one address to alleviate this posting problem.

      • If, as a list administrator, you determine your list is utilized only for a pre-defined working group of e-mail addresses (for example, a committee), you can select the "Private List" option, which will reject new subscribers. (You can always use the web interface to add additional subscribers as necessary.)

      How can an individual subscribe to a list?

      To subscribe to a list, interested parties should send an e-mail to listmanager@swe.org.

      The e-mail should have a blank subject line, and must have only the following line in the body:

      subscribe {listname} {subscribername}

      where {listname} is the name of the list to which the individual wishes to subscribe and {subscribername} is the individual’s name (for example "Jane Doe".) Note that regardless of the subscribername entered, the individual WILL ONLY BE SUBSCRIBED FOR THE E-MAIL ADDRESS THE MESSAGE COMES FROM.

      This is a SPAM protection measure as most SPAMMERs will be unwilling or unable to subscribe with a legitimate e-mail address in order to post to the list. It also reduces the chance that SPAMMERs will attempt to subscribe a group of non-SWE addresses to your list and use the list serv to SPAM them.

      How can a subscriber unsubscribe herself?

      To unsubcribe from the list, the subscriber must send an e-mail to listmanager@swe.org. This e-mail must come from the e-mail account from which she originally subscribed.

      The e-mail should have a blank subject line, and must have only the following line in the body:

      unsubscribe {listname}

      where {listname} is the name of the list from which the individual wishes to unsubscribe.

      Due to increased restrictions on posting, it is possible subscribers who signed up under the old list serv software with an alias, or who no longer have access to the e-mail address they are attempting to unsubscribe, will receive an "Unsuccessful Unsubscribe" message. They will be notified that the owner-{listname}@swe.org can remove them from the list.

      Why are responses to posted messages only sent to the person sending the message?

      All the lists have been transferred so that when recipients of a list serv message "reply", the default response is addressed ONLY to the original poster, not the entire list. If a response needs to go to the entire list, the responder will simply need to type in the appropriate listname@swe.org as the recipient before sending the message. A primary use of many SWE list servs is to send announcements (for example, seeking volunteers or reminding members about section events) and thus it is inappropriate for responses to automatically be routed to all list serv subscribers. The administrative console allows the list administrator to change this behavior by selecting the "Reply to list" option.

      Why is a list poster getting a bounceback with a subject line similar to: "Article rejected, un-authorized poster of poster@domain.com"?

      Some individuals may experience difficulty posting to a list due to the new list setting option that allows posting only by subscribers. (This setting will greatly reduce the amount of SPAM.) With this setting enabled, subscribers must post to the list using the e-mail address under which they are subscribed. This can create an issue for a subscriber who subscribed using an alias or who is using multiple e-mail addresses and attempting to post from an e-mail account from which she did not originally subscribe.

      You can remove subscribers who have posting problems due to alias addresses through the administrative console. You may also add them back to the list with a non-alias through the administrator console. Alternately they can re-subscribe themselves by sending an e-mail from the e-mail account under which they wish to be subscribed to listmanager@swe.org, with the following embedded in the e-mail body:

      subscribe {listname} {subscribername}

      where {listname} is the name of the list to which the individual wishes to subscribe and {subscribername} is the individual’s name (for example "Jane Doe".) Note that regardless of the subscribername entered, the individual WILL ONLY BE SUBSCRIBED FOR THE E-MAIL ADDRESS THE MESSAGE COMES FROM.

      Why is a list poster getting a bounceback with the subject line similar to: "Article rejected due to size greater than XXX". ?

      General interest lists with potentially large numbers of subscribers are typically set to accept only messages with a size less than 200K (200,000 bytes). This is necessary for two primary reasons: first, to preserve the bandwidth serving the SWE mail and web server, and secondly, because not everyone receives their SWE-related e-mail via a high speed connection. Posters wishing to make a large attachment available to a wide distribution list should ideally post the document on a web page or ftp site. Then, a link and/or login information can be provided in the list serv message, rather than posting the message with the attachment.

      This maximum message size can be limited further through the administrative console if the list contains a large number of low speed connection users. For contact type list servs distributing to a relatively small numbers of individuals (i.e. 20 or fewer subscribers, like committees, task forces), the maximum message size should not exceed the entry 2,000,000 (approximately 2 MB).

      Why is an individual attempting to subscribe getting a return message with the subject header: "Invalid Syntax!"?

      The body of the message the individual receives will contain instructions regarding valid syntax from the "help file". You are free to edit this help file for your specific list. Note that the subscribe command syntax uses 3 parameters, the third of which is the subscriber’s name. The subscribername is a required parameter that may have been forgotten in the subscription request.

      Why is an individual attempting to unsubscribe getting a return message with the subject header: "Unsuccessful Unsubscribe"

      Due to the increased restriction on posting, it is possible that subscribers who signed up on the old system with an alias as well as subscribers who do not have access to the e-mail address they are attempting to unsubscribe will receive an Unsuccessful Unsubscribe message. They will be notified to contact the owner-{listname}@swe.org to remove them from the list.

      To become familiar with typical tasks and settings a list owner needs to know, please see the Quick Start List Serv Guide. Comprehensive information on SWE list servs is also available in the SWE List Serv Administration Documentation. These two documents provide detailed instructions on how to use the administrative web interface to subscribe and unsubscribe individuals, and to modify list serv settings to best meet the goals of your list serv. Please contact listadmin@swe.org for additional assistance.

               

      About SWE - Leadership - PD Awards

      Professional Development Committee – Specific Volunteer Coordinators

      Awards Coordinator

      The Professional Development Committee is looking for an Awards Coordinator, one or two-year term. This role will involve receiving award applications for the Awards Chair, setting up meetings with other committee chairs to judge awards, and submitting award results to SWE Headquarters before deadline. Previous award application judging experience is desired, but not required.

      Region and Collegiate Members

      The committee is also seeking region and collegiate members to improve the diversity of the committee and increase region representation.

      About SWE - Leadership - PD Region & Collegiate

      Professional Development Committee – Specific Volunteer Coordinators

      Awards Coordinator

      The Professional Development Committee is looking for an Awards Coordinator, one or two-year term. This role will involve receiving award applications for the Awards Chair, setting up meetings with other committee chairs to judge awards, and submitting award results to SWE Headquarters before deadline. Previous award application judging experience is desired, but not required.

      Region and Collegiate Members

      The committee is also seeking region and collegiate members to improve the diversity of the committee and increase region representation.

      About SWE - Leadership - Teller

      Tellers Committee

      The Teller's Committee is responsible for insuring that the SWE annual election process is conducted according to procedure in a fair and consistent manner. In the event of a contested election, or some irregularity, the Teller's committee serves to determine if there is sufficient cause for a re-ballot. The Teller's Committee Chair reports to the President of the Society of Women Engineers. The Teller's Report is provided to the Society per the Elections procedure.

      Scholarship Recipients

      The Society of Women Engineers Congratulates Scholarship Recipients

      The recipients of SWE scholarships are listed by class status for each academic year. 

      2013-2014 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors & Graduate Students
      2012-2013 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors & Graduate Students
      2011-2012 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors & Graduate Students
      2010-2011 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors & Graduate Students
      2009- 2010 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors & Graduate Students
      2008 - 2009 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors & Graduate Students
       2007 - 2008 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors & Graduate Students
       2006 - 2007 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors & Graduate Students
      2005 - 2006 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors & Graduate Students
      2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors & Graduate Students
      2003 - 2004 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors & Graduate Students
       2002 - 2003 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors & Graduate Students
      2001 - 2002 ACADEMIC YEAR
      Freshmen Juniors
      Sophomores Seniors &  Graduate Students

      Collegiate Start Up

      Startup a Collegiate Section or Collegiate Interest Group


      SWE welcomes new Collegiate Sections and Collegiate Interest Groups (CIGs) and is very interested in helping each existing Collegiate Section and CIG to remain an active, significant organization on the campus.

       

      Starting a Collegiate Section

      A group of college students at an eligible school that does not have a SWE Collegiate Section may initiate one by following the application procedure below or by requesting “An Invitation to Organize a Collegiate Section of SWE" package from SWE Headquarters.

      Application Procedure
      Application

      Requirements:

      • At least 10 collegiate members

      • At least 50 % of the members are women majoring in engineering or engineering technology

      • At least 8 members expect to be eligible for membership for the fiscal year following granting of the charter

      • The Collegiate Section will operate under the guidance of a SWE Counselor

      For assistance, contact the New Collegiate Section Coordinator at ncsc@swe.org.

       

      Starting a Collegiate Interest Group (CIG)

      For those collegiate groups interested in becoming affiliated with SWE that cannot meet the requirements outlined for a collegiate section, a new option is available – Collegiate Interest Group (CIG). A CIG allows the collegiate members to utilize the name of the Society for group functions, without the need to fulfill all the requirements of a collegiate section. Although CIG collegiate members are entitled to all the individual collegiate membership benefits, the CIG will not be entitled to the same benefits as a collegiate section. In other words, a CIG can not request, apply for, or compete for, collegiate section rebates or awards given out annually by the Society. A collegiate member can still apply for, or compete for, individual collegiate awards and scholarships given out annually by the Society.

      Benefits of Collegiate Interest Groups:

      • Allows for fluctuation in collegiate membership numbers, i.e. it is not necessary to maintain the minimum required ten (10) SWE collegiate members.

      • Eliminates completing the Annual and Financial Reports required at the Society level. However, it is highly recommended that contact and financial information be recorded annually with the CIG Sponsor as defined in the CIG Roles and Responsibilities document.

      • Allows a body of individual SWE collegiate members at a school without a SWE collegiate section to operate as a group in the name of the Society of Women Engineers.

      • Promotes interaction and mentoring opportunities with other SWE Members on the local, regional and national levels.

      For assistance, contact the New Collegiate Interest Group Coordinator at cig-coordinator@swe.org.

      CIG Application Procedures
      CIG Application
      CIG Roles & Responsibilities

      Requirements:

      • At least 4 collegiate members

      • Letter of support from Faculty Advisor

      • Letter of support from SWE Sponsor

      Collegiate Startup - CA APPRO

      Petition to Charter a Collegiate Section Application Procedure

      A. Purpose

      The purpose of this document is to define the requirements and explain how to start a SWE Collegiate Section or to reinstate the charter of a section that has been deactivated. It includes activities and deliverables for initially starting and obtaining a charter for the New Collegiate Section. The requirements are the same for reinstating the charter of a section that has been deactivated.

      B. Definition of a SWE Collegiate Section

      A SWE Collegiate Section is a body of individual SWE Collegiate Members enrolled in a college or university in the United States or Puerto Rico that wishes to function as a recognized SWE collegiate section. A college or university with an existing SWE Collegiate Interest Group (CIG) that meets the requirements for a SWE Collegiate Section may petition to become a Collegiate Section.

      C. Benefits of Being a SWE Collegiate Section

      A SWE Collegiate Section allows a body of individual SWE collegiate members at a school to operate as a group in the name of the Society of Women Engineers.

      A SWE Collegiate Section allows the collegiate members to utilize the name of the Society for group functions. The individuals are entitled to all the individual collegiate membership benefits as well as the right to compete for collegiate section awards given out annually by the Society. The collegiate section also receives a rebate for every collegiate membership.

      A SWE Collegiate Section promotes interaction and mentoring opportunities with other SWE Members on the local, regional, and national levels.

      D. Contact Information

      Students interested in forming a SWE Collegiate Section can download the Application from the SWE web site or contact SWE Headquarters for a Collegiate Section Application package.

      Students can request this information at hq@swe.org  or

      Society of Women Engineers Headquarters
      203 N La Salle Street, Suite 1675
      Chicago, IL 60601
      Phone: 312.596.5223, Fax: 312.596.5252

      E. Steps for Forming or Reinstating a SWE Collegiate Section

      Interested students at a college or university in the United States or Puerto Rico should go through the following steps to charter or reinstate a SWE Collegiate Section.

      1. Have all interested students apply for individual SWE collegiate memberships online. Go to www.swe.org/join to apply electronically.

      2. Start meeting as a group. During the “formation period” and until approval is obtained, the group can call itself a Proposed Collegiate Section of the Society of Women Engineers. Keep a record of when and where the group meets and the purpose of the meeting.

      3. Find a SWE Counselor from the area who will be committed to supporting the Collegiate Section. This person is a requirement for the Collegiate Section, and will need to write a letter of support and sign the application form. This person must be a SWE member in good standing.

      4. Find a Faculty Advisor from the school who will be committed to supporting the Collegiate Section. This person is highly recommended for the Collegiate Section, and will need to write a letter of support on school letterhead and sign the application form. This person does not need to be a SWE member.

      5. Once the Proposed Collegiate Section reaches the minimum level of ten (10) SWE collegiate members, contact SWE Headquarters and request a Petition to Charter a SWE Collegiate Section Package. Refer to Section D.

      6. Contact the New Collegiate Section Coordinator at ncsc@swe.org  and inform her of their school’s desire to form a Collegiate Section.

      7. After downloading the SWE Collegiate Section Application Package from the SWE web site or receiving it from SWE Headquarters, read and understand all documents in the package, especially the SWE Bylaws template and Collegiate Section Manual.

      8. Complete all sections of the application form and the bylaws template. Refer to Section F below.

      9. After completing the form, mail the original application package including all required attachments to SWE Headquarters for approval. Keep a copy of this complete package for your files.

      10. This ends the proposed collegiate section’s responsibility for the application process. SWE Headquarters will notify the group upon approval. If they are not approved the New Collegiate Section Coordinator will contact them.

      Note: It is recommended that steps 3 through 8 be done in parallel.

      F. Requirements for a Complete Collegiate Section Application Form

      • Minimum of ten (10) paid SWE collegiate members specifying degree/major and expected date of graduation listed as well as their signatures

      • Permanent school mailing address and email address

      • Letter of Support and Signature from a SWE Counselor

      • Letter of Support and Signature from a Faculty Advisor on school letterhead

      • Letter of Support from the Dean of Engineering on school letterhead

      • Letter of Support from the nearest Member Section President, Region Governor, or the Members-at-Large (MAL) organization President. (SWE Headquarters can help you obtain SWE contacts.)

      • Approximate number of women students in engineering, technology or related programs

      • Approximate number of the total students in engineering, technology or related programs

      • A list of meetings held in the last 12 months.

      • At least one of the following: list of future meetings and events, overall proposed strategic plan, budget proposal for the following year, and/or newsletter articles or publicity flyers.

      • Bylaws template must be completed and emailed to bylaws-chair@swe.org

      G. Submitting the Collegiate Section Application Package

      1. Complete all sections of the application. Details of each section are included in Section H below.

      2. Attach all required letters of support and evidence of section sustainability.

      3. Mail the original application package to SWE Headquarters (Attn: Membership Department) for approval. Retain a complete copy of the package for your records.

      4. SWE Headquarters confirms all information and signs off.

      5. SWE HQ scans and emails copies of the complete application package to the appropriate contact on the Board of Directors, the Collegiate Interests Committee Chair, and the New Collegiate Section Coordinator (NSSC) for review. The Region Governor and the Region Collegiate Coordinator are copied on the email. SWE HQ keeps the original hardcopy on file.

      6. The appropriate contact on the BOD, the Collegiate Interests Committee Chair, and the New Collegiate Section Coordinator email headquarters with their approval of the petition. These approvals are attached to petition.

      7. The appropriate contact on the Board of Directors presents the motion to charter the collegiate section to the SWE Board of Directors (BOD).

      8. The BOD approves the motion to charter a new collegiate section.

      9. SWE HQ signs off and dates.

      10. If the application or motion is not approved, the New Collegiate Section Coordinator contacts the proposed collegiate section.

      11. Upon approval, SWE HQ sends a congratulatory letter to the Collegiate Section. The following individuals are copied on the letter: the Collegiate Section Counselor, the Faculty Advisor, and the Dean of Engineering.

      12. SWE Headquarters sends electronic copies of the congratulatory letter to the following persons: the appropriate contact on the Board of Directors, the Collegiate Interests Committee Chair, the New Collegiate Section Coordinator, the Region Governor, and the Region Collegiate Representative.

      H. Information to Include in the Collegiate Section Application Package

      1. College or University Name: Enter the official school name of the college or university in the United States or Puerto Rico applying for charter. Strike that which does not apply in the first sentence on the petition (“new” or “to reinstate the Charter for the”).  

      2. Section Bylaws: Checking the box indicates that the Proposed Collegiate Section agrees to complete the bylaws template and abide by the Collegiate Section Bylaws. Since the proposed bylaws must be reviewed and approved by the Bylaws Chair before being approved by the Board of Directors, two months additional time will be required to complete the charter procedure.

      3. Signatures: The President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer of the proposed collegiate section must sign and date the petition. The Secretary and Treasurer position may be combined into one position of Secretary-Treasurer.

      4. Permanent Address: This address should be a permanent school address that can be used to contact SWE members. Do NOT use a student’s personal mailing address. This can be the address of the Faculty Advisor, Student Affairs Office, or the appropriate school Dean.

      5. School Data: This information can be obtained from the Faculty Advisor, Student Affairs Office, or the appropriate school Dean.

      6. Collegiate Members of the Proposed Collegiate Section: Complete and submit your Collegiate Membership Application to SWE Headquarters in advance of completing this application. Print and sign your name, include your degree / certificate / major information, expected date of graduation and your SWE Collegiate Membership number. If you do not remember or can not locate your SWE Collegiate Membership number, contact SWE Headquarters for this information. A minimum of ten (10) Collegiate Member signatures is required.

      7. Evidence of Section Sustainability: Provide a list of meetings held to date. Also, provide one of the following: a list of future meetings and events, an overall strategic plan, a budget proposal for the following year, and/or newsletter articles or publicity flyers.

      8. SWE Counselor: A SWE Counselor is required. The SWE Counselor must complete this section and attach to the application a letter of support. The SWE Counselor must be a Member or Member-at-Large in good standing.

      9. School Faculty Advisor: A Faculty Advisor is not required, but strongly recommended for a Collegiate Section. The Faculty Advisor, if identified, needs to complete this section and attach to the application a letter of support on school letterhead. The Faculty Advisor is not required to be a SWE Member.

      10. Additional Letters of Support: Attach a letter of support from the Dean of Engineering on school letterhead. Attach a letter of support from the nearest Member Section President, the Region Director, or the Members-at-Large organization President. SWE Headquarters can help you obtain contact information for these SWE individuals.

      SWE Magazine Literature Review

      Recognizing the long-standing and ongoing need to compile research on women in engineering, SWE Magazine publishes an annual review of literature that provides expert analysis of published documents in the engineering and technology fields with a focus on women’s issues. It examines peer-reviewed articles, dissertations, reports and conferences. Sources range from the mainstream media to academic journals to engineering/scientific society magazines. 

      As part of the yearlong 60th anniversary celebration, SWE has released a comprehensive review of the most impactful science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)-related literature.

       

      The compilation spans nearly a decade of SWE Magazine’s annual reviews.

       

      Funded by the Clare Boothe Luce Program of the Henry Luce Foundation, the collection includes a simple search feature that enables easy access to the research. It will be updated yearly to provide the most current research.


      Literature Review

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       


      SWE Literature Review Past Issues

      Women in Engineering: A Review of the 2009 Literature
      Women in Engineering: A Review of the 2008 Literature
      Women in Engineering: A Review of the 2007 Literature
      Women in Engineering: A Review of the 2006 Literature
      Women in Engineering: A Review of the 2005 Literature  
      Women in Engineering: A Review of the 2004 Literature
      Women in Engineering: A Review of the 2003 Literature

      2002 Survey of Literature (Zipped)
      By Lisa M. Frehill, Jammie Benton-Speyer, and Pamel Hunt

      2001 Survey of Literature (Zipped)
      By Claire Thielen, SWE

      Memorable Articles from Past Issues 

      Survey of SWE to the Presidential Campaigns
      NAMCE: 30 Years, Thousands of Stories

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      About SWE - Leadership - Strategic Communications Council

      Strategic Communications Council

      The Society of Women Engineers Strategic Communications Council (SCC) is chartered with creating the policies, procedures, and standards for all SWE internal and external communications. From logo usage to the web site to public relations strategy and policy, the SCC is the driving force behind the Society to provide clear, consistent communications to all constituents.

      The Electronic Communications Committee (ECC), formerly chartered with the SWE web site strategy, has been rolled in the SCC to form one entity for setting policy and directions for all communications. The SCC has a subcommittee – the Web Site Subcommittee – to handle the redesign and re-architecture of the National Web Site. This is a major initiative of the SCC to improve and update the Society’s web presence.

      Awards

      Communication is the key to letting members and the public know about SWE. The SCC sponsors communications awards for professional and student sections.

      About SWE - Leasdership - Editorial Board

      Editorial Board

      The Editorial Board provides guidance for the award-winning SWE Magazine, the official magazine of the Society; suggests themes for each issue, generates ideas for articles; assists magazine staff in locating contacts and resources for articles, and identifies issues of interest to SWE members and other stakeholders.  The Board ensures that the magazine presents a professional appearance, maintains high quality editorial content, and supports the strategic goals of the Society.

      About SWE - Leadership - Professional Development

      Professional Development Committee

      The Professional Development (PD) Committee is responsible for promoting SWE programs for the personal and professional enhancement of the members. The Professional Development committee helps SWE sections plan, execute, and advertise their Professional Development programs. The format and outline for the Professional Development annual report is updated and maintained by this committee. The judging criteria used for the annual Professional Development Awards also are determined by this committee. Committee members can help you with ideas and questions on everything from meetings and seminars to writing your Professional Development report.

      The mission of the Professional Development Committee is to assist members of SWE in developing and enhancing their professional skills as engineers and as leaders. Goals for this fiscal year include developing and launching professional development program tracks for entry-level and middle management. These tracks will include a variety of delivery methods including face-to-face seminars, web seminars, and discussion threads.

      Career Center - PD Article - Outside Box

      Going Outside the Career Box

      Allowing yourself to mentally limit your career potential based on others perceptions is a common problem in career planning. You need to be willing to think "outside the box" and follow these principles:

      • Be your own judge of your career potential
      • Shore up any identified weaknesses
      • Look and act like the job you want
      • Apply for jobs that stretch your skills not jobs that are an exact fit
      • Do not get discouraged

      Consider whether your education, experience, skills, and desires are compatible with the job you want. Do not let others opinions cause you to lower your standards. Early in my career I had a boss tell me that I would move up faster if I were less outspoken in my technical opinion and would "keep my mouth shut in meetings." After analyzing his advice, I determined that the quality of my technical judgment and advice were two of my job strengths. I would have severely damaged my professional career if I had taken his advice. I now make my living as a consultant and am paid primarily for the very thing that this early boss tried to steer me away from.

      Plot a path to eliminate any weaknesses that inhibit your career progression. Common career limiting weaknesses include poor communication or presentation skills, lack of a degree/advanced degree, lack of a PE, or poor work image. Take classes to improve your communication skills. Join clubs like Toastmasters to improve speaking and presentation skills. Part time degree programs are widely available. Use Self-study or university courses to study for the PE exam. Consult mentors, and friends to advice you on improving your work image. Use organizations such as SWE to demonstrate leadership skills that you do not have the opportunity to demonstrate in your current position.

      Modify your image to match the job you want. Observe the style, dress, and activities of people in the job you seek. By tailoring your image to more closely mate the job you seek, you will make it easier for others to think of you in that position. Apply for the highest level jobs that your current skills warrant. Compare your skills to people already in similar jobs. At a certain level, perceived qualities are as important as demonstrated skills. Do not mentally eliminate yourself from the competition. For example, JD, an engineer who worked with me in a previous job, was trying to get a job at a government agency. The personnel department told him he was unqualified for the job he applied for. He applied at a lower level and was told the same thing. JD analyzed his skills and tried a new strategy. He started applying for higher level positions. Finally, he was hired two levels above the first position that he was "unqualified for."

      Do not get easily discouraged. It may take some time to find a company and a position that appreciate your skills and match your working style. My friend Mona worked as a non-degreed engineer for 20 years. When she was laid off, she finished her degree. She went to work for a company that treated her as a newly graduated engineer. Mona attended night school and got an advanced degree while she looked for a better career match that gave her full credit for her achievements. She accepted a bridge job that gave her partial credit for her experience and offered important skill development opportunities. Recently she accepted a position that gave her full credit for her experience and education and matched her personal style. Mona went from being treated as a newly graduated engineer to a senior manager in less than four years. 

      Remember the following guidelines to maximize your career potential and think "outside the career box:" 

      • Judge your own career potential
      • Shore up identified weaknesses
      • Look and act like the job you want
      • Apply up for jobs
      • Keep trying

      Career Center - PD Article - Manage Career

      How to Successfully Manage Your Career

      Anyone with more than a few months work experience will realize that survival and success on the job is not determined solely by skills, level of education, or experience. Understanding the factors that govern getting ahead at work will lower your stress levels, and increases your chances of moving ahead. The following nine critical rules should be considered in managing your career: • YOU are responsible for charting your own career path.

      • Ask for and get line assignments.
      • Opportunity is usually more important than money.
      • Hire your boss or company.
      • Publicize your successes.
      • Good job performance is not perfection.
      • Mistakes are acceptable if you learn from them.
      • Build a reputation for integrity.
      • Understand your organization structure.
      • Take Responsibility for Your Career Path

      Many women take a passive approach when it comes to managing their career. Do not rely on your company or your supervisor to get you the training that you need to move ahead or let you know about advancement opportunities. Take an aggressive role in determining what training you need to "fill your tool box." It is YOUR JOB, not your supervisors, to ensure that you take maximum advantage of company training opportunities. It is also YOUR JOB to ensure that your current assignment and training is going in the direction you would like. Go outside the company, if needed, to expand your skill base. Watch job postings within your company and network to get information on what is available. Don't be afraid to ask for those "resume building" assignments. I worked with a woman who complained that her supervisor never sent her to training. However, I observed that she did not take responsibility to remind him when classes were coming up that would be of value to her. She also never proposed work around plans to ensure him that the department workload got done while she was in class.

      Don't Get Sidetracked

      Many women engineers are sent along an administrative sidetrack that prevents them from reaching top management positions later in their career. If your career goal is to move into high level engineering management, then ask for the line and field assignments. Get construction, operations, and line level experience as early in your career as possible. Think about how your current assignment will look on your resume and think about the overall balance of your career. To move up to the top, you need to have a well-rounded background in your area of engineering. Keep your technical skills sharp and avoid becoming an overpaid clerk, scheduler, or technical editor.

      Beware the "Daughter Syndrome." It can be a career killer. In the "Daughter Syndrome" your boss sees you as a surrogate for his daughter. This means that he may not give you those "nasty" field assignments that involve rude construction workers and hard physical conditions because he wants to "protect" you and "take care of you." However, without those "nasty" assignments in a few years, you may find yourself out of the "golden boy" track and slotted exclusively to administrative tasks at a lower pay level.

      Conversely, older women engineers should beware the "Mommy Syndrome." In the "Mommy Syndrome" you are viewed as the nurturer and shoulder of choice to cry on. Do not lose track of what you were hired to accomplish. 

      Opportunity Is More Important than Money

      I have seen many beginning engineers take the highest paying job that was offered without regard for working conditions, and advancement opportunity. Look at the big picture when taking a job to determine if it meets your long-term career goals. Also consider, will the company support you going back to school. Will they allow flextime to better balance career and family? Does the position put you in a better position to enhance your skills and make job contacts? I graduated with an electrical engineer that went to work for a law publishing company at half my starting salary. My friend’s company ended up paying his way through law school and twenty years later he is making about five times what I make in a year.

      Hire Your Boss

      Put as much effort into selecting a boss or company as they put into selecting you. Make sure that your boss’s personality style matches your own, that he or she is supportive and has a good track record with previous employees, and that he or she will move up. No amount of money is worth a job where the boss aspires to become a Brigadier General and treats people like furniture. An incompetent boss will block your advancement potential because 1) he is not capable of judging the quality of your work and 2) he isn't going anywhere. Ask Society of Women Engineer contacts about a boss’s reputation and also ask some of his subordinates on the sly. In the interview, be sure and ask about turnover rates and, if they are high, the reason why. Don't be afraid to turn down a job that "doesn't feel right."

      Publicize Yourself

      In your career, if no one knows about it, it didn't happen. Put up those plaques that you won for teamwork and performance. Make sure that your significant successes are noted in the company newsletter when appropriate. If you have pertinent experience for an assignment, then say so. Tell your management if you win a significant award. I once knew an operations manager who wore his Ivy League College Letter Jacket everywhere even though it had been over thirty years since his graduation. Get someone to nominate you for an award that you feel you deserve. Also make sure that your resume adequately reflects your accomplishments.

      Avoid the Perfection Trap

      Do not confuse perfection with good job performance. Good job performance is producing an acceptable product within cost and schedule constraints. The last ten-percent of the quality can take most of the budget and schedule. I have seen many clients who were upset at getting "perfect" products, three weeks after they were needed. You will get a reputation of not being able to prioritize your work if you do not develop skills to determine what is enough to meet customer expectations. This type of reputation can be the kiss of death for advancement. Also, listen to what the client says he wants and give it to him.

      Dealing With Mistakes

      Mistakes are acceptable if you learn from them. What an employer or a client hates to see is someone who keeps repeating the same mistakes; someone who does not admit when they made a mistake; or someone who does not do everything possible to make a mistake right. If you make a mistake, learn from it, admit it (but don't get whiney), fix it, and move on.

      Build a Reputation for Integrity

      Build a reputation for integrity and helpfulness. In the last few years I have received several job recommendations from people that I worked with ten to fifteen years ago. At the time, I had no idea that being fair and helpful to these people could benefit me in the future. Over ten or twenty years, your reputation will follow you and can make or break job opportunities. Also, never take a cheap shot at someone. This type of behavior is sure to come back and haunt you.

      Understand the Organization

      Most organizations function along a military structure. This means that you need to follow your chain of command and get out if you find yourself unable to do what your boss asks. Bypassing your boss is usually tantamount to declaring office war. 

      Career Center - PD Article - Luck

      The Role of “Luck” in Your Career

      Fortuitous is defined as "occurring by change," "lucky," or "a positive destiny or fate." Sometimes we look at a stellar career and attribute the success to the turns of luck accompanying their progression through the organization. In addition to skill, experience, and education, "luck" can play a significant role in our careers. You can increase your "luck" by being better prepared to take those unexpected opportunities that present themselves throughout your career. The following tips will help.

      Expand Your Network

      Increase your professional and social contacts, and you increase the chance that a new career opportunity will come to you. SWE and other professional societies are a great way to make this happen. People who have a positive impression of you may think of you when a career opportunity opens up. Behave in a friendly, professional manner to everyone on your current job. I have seen many people closed off from career opportunities because they had unpleasant personalities or behaved badly to people "beneath them" in the organization. Don't lose track of all of your fellow workers when you leave a job. I am still in contact with select people from jobs I held over 15 years ago. Set aside some time on a regular basis to keep in touch with old friends, even if it is just a card or phone call every six months. These contacts are invaluable both on a personal and professional level. I got my last job from a friend who was approached for the job, didn't want to move, and recommended me.

      Help Others Whenever You Get the Chance

      Don't make networking a one way street. Pass useful information and job opportunities on to others when it is appropriate, even if you don't see an immediate benefit. If you can spare the time, and the effort does not hurt anyone, you should pursue requests for help. It is often the small favors that open doors in the long run.

      Increase Your Visibility

      Opportunities will not come if you are "invisible" to those both in and out of your company. Consider writing an article for a publication, speaking to a local group, serving as an officer in a local organization, or volunteering in the community. Judge science fairs or work with your local girl scouts. Attend technical conferences whenever possible.

      Keep Your Tools Current

      Make sure that you stay up to date in your technical area including taking training courses and seminars when required. Attend technical conferences. Ask for growth assignments. Develop public speaking and presentation skills. "Toastmasters" is a good way to improve your public speaking skills. Power Point is a good piece of presentation software to learn. Read technical magazines to keep up with the latest trends. Become computer literate.

      Do Your Research

      Be familiar enough with your industry to know what else you could do and what you are worth on the open market. Know who the top performers are in your field. Be able to speak knowledgeably in your area of expertise.

      Trust Your Instinct

      If an opportunity presents itself and you have a gut feeling either for or against it, give serious consideration to that feeling. That gut feeling often has a good basis in fact. Moving to a prestigious assignment where you flounder because of work style will reduce your future opportunities.

      Follow Your Bliss

      A person who is already successful and happy in her field is much more attractive to potential opportunities than one who is miserable and hates what she is doing. By setting your career track towards the areas that you love, you will be better positioned to shine.

      Know Your Show Stoppers

      Great opportunities may arise with a small window of opportunity. Know in advance what is important to you so that you can react to opportunities quickly. Sit back and brainstorm on the characteristics of your ideal job. You need to know what limitations you are willing to accept. Can you change companies? Can you move? How much travel is acceptable? Could you accept less money if all other factors were perfect? Is position and recognition important to you? Discuss these limitations with your family so you have a good idea at all times of what you can and cannot do.

      Challenge Your Limitations

      Make a list of the obstacles that your feel have limited your career progression so far. Go down the list and challenge each of the obstacles that you have listed. Decide whether you can do anything to eliminate some of these factors. For example, a non-degreed engineer can go to night school to eliminate this obstacle to career advancement.

      Don't Be Afraid to Ask

      Ask to be considered for interesting jobs that open up both in and out of your company. Ask for changes in your current job that would improve your career path, or make your life easier. Ask for training that will improve your job skills. If you do it in a professional manner, the worst answer you can get is a no.

      Take Advantage of Opportunities

      Learn to recognize a career opportunity. Be prepared to get all pertinent facts, evaluate the option, and move fast or pass it onto someone else if an opportunity arises. A friend of mine has a job today because I ran to her home, made her pull the curlers out of her hair, and dragged her into a SWE meeting to meet with an engineering manager who was speaking that day.

      These eleven tips, combined with your skills, and work experience will better prepare you to quickly grab those unexpected opportunities, that will improve your career path. Remember

      • Expand Your Network
      • Help Others Whenever You Get the Chance
      • Increase Your Visibility
      • Keep Your Tools Current
      • Do Your Research
      • Trust Your Instinct
      • Follow Your Bliss
      • Know Your Show Stoppers
      • Challenge Your Limitations
      • Don't Be Afraid to Ask
      • Take Advantage of Opportunities.

      Career Center - PD Article - Seven Steps

      Seven Steps for Negotiating the Best Salary

      You have identified the company. An interview date is set. Now what do you do to help ensure that you negotiate the best salary. Here are seven strategies to negotiating your best deal.

      Step 1 - Do Your Homework

      Before you go into the interview, know as much as you can about the job and the company you are striving for.

      • Is the company expanding or contracting? Is it in a growth industry? You have more negotiating flexibility with an expanding company in a growth industry.
      • Is it a large corporation or a small startup company? You probably want to focus your negotiation on salary and position with a large company. Small companies may be more flexible on position, benefits, and hours worked.
      • Why is the job open? Having this information may tell you how much the company needs a replacement and what the job conditions are like.

      Step 2 - Sell Yourself

      You should take a position of quiet, understated confidence. Your career record speaks for itself. Do not get nervous and do not try to finalize the deal too quickly. Deal from a position of strength.

      Step 3 - Let the Employer Set the Interview Pace

      You should be ready to small talk or get right down to business depending on the cues you get from the interviewer. Be flexible and argue logically. Do not bluff or make promises you can't keep. Be honest, direct and respectful of the employer’s position but stand up for yourself.

      Step 4 - Define Your Negotiating Limits

      Your negotiating position is based upon the following points:

      • Prior salary

      • Industry salary range

      • Value of benefits/job conditions

      • Cost of living in job location

      • Individual strengths.

      Before you quote your prior salary make sure you are not comparing apples and oranges. For example, a 40 hour a week job that pays $48,000, pays all of your medical insurance premiums (valued at $3,000) and gives you four weeks vacation pays the same amount per hour as a 50 hour a week $68,000 job with no insurance and no vacation. Make sure you negotiate the package not the salary.

      Industry salary ranges can be obtained from professional societies, industry contacts, and from the U.S. Department of Labor. You can find a lot of this data on the world wide web or at the local public library. You can also call your SWE contacts and ask others in a similar job for advice.

      If your current job has better benefits, do not forget to factor these "intangibles" into your considerations. If the potential job has better benefits, don't bring it up. Also consider, does the new job have flextime or other advantages such as educational reimbursement, or pay for overtime, a better title, or an opportunity to gain experience which will ultimately benefit your career. Also, consider the working conditions. No amount of money is worth working in an office where employees are treated like furniture and every day is miserable. Consider stopping someone in the Lady’s room and asking about the company culture.

      Factor in the cost of living difference between the old and new location. Career magazine has a web site that lets you enter the old and new locations and your current salary and gives you a rough idea of what you would have to earn to make up for cost of living differences (http://www.homefair.com/calc/salcalc.html).

      Honestly appraise your job skills versus the market to determine if you are at the top or bottom of the range for your potential job. Also identify how many similarly skilled people are on the market. If you are going for a hard to fill position in a growth industry, you can negotiate for a higher price. Also consider the market value of your current job. In some cases, the market value of what you are doing may be less than what you are currently making. If this is the case, you need to evaluate whether other factors are worth the change.

      Step 5 - Stress Your Accomplishments But Understand the Company and its Goals

      Employers want to pay a fair wage but do not want to pay more than they have to. Therefore, you need to package your accomplishments to emphasize how they fulfill the employers needs. Drive home your accomplishments and do not be falsely modest. However, do not expect a company to pay you for a skill that they cannot use.

      Step 6 - State Salary Demands Firmly, Tactfully, and Diplomatically

      It is usually better to let the employer name the salary range first. Employers who present broad salary ranges are more flexible on salary but often do not know what they are looking for. Employers who present narrow ranges usually know what they want and will not compromise. When negotiating, ask for a salary higher than you want to give room to compromise. If an employer makes a low ball offer, do not make a scene but nicely explain that you are flattered with the offer but disappointed with the salary and make a counteroffer. Be prepared to politely turn a job down if you cannot come to terms. Remember that the employer may come back to you later if you decline in a professional manner and they are not able to fill the position.

      Step 7 - Get the Whole Deal in Writing

      Get every aspect of your deal in writing. I have known people who were promised promotions after six months by supervisors who left before the six months were up, people who were paid bonuses in plummeting company stock options rather than cash, people who were asked to work 50 hour rather than 40 hour per week after they accepted a position, and people who were not reimbursed for moves. If it is important to you, get it in writing.

      Career Center - PD Article - Working with Spouse

      Working with a Spouse or Significant

      Other A woman engineer is likely to be working in the same office/department with a spouse or significant other at some time in her career. Handling this dual relationship and other's reaction to it creates unique challenges. Below are some tips to deal with these challenges.

      Hiring

      Most written nepotism rules are now limited to direct reporting relationships. However, even today, there are companies that are uncomfortable having a couple working together in the same office and who let hiring decisions be influenced by this discomfort. For example, I found an engineering consulting job, and another spot opened up. My husband's resume was not even considered until five other applicants were interviewed and his resume was selected by the client as the only one acceptable out of more than a dozen presented. Find out in advance about any nepotism policies. Anticipate that there may be resistance to hiring you both in the same company and deal with it. Make sure that you adequately package your qualifications so that merit overrides any personal discomfort. Do not call attention to the fact that the other applicant has a relationship with you, but do not hide it if asked.

      Behavior in the Office and at Meetings

      I once had a boss warn me (without cause) that there would be "No 'PDA' (Public Display of Affection) in MY OFFICE." While this type of instruction is not needed, it is nevertheless true that kissing, landholding, or overly familiar behavior in the office makes other workers uncomfortable and can be detrimental to your career. In addition, you will be more vulnerable to criticism that you are conducting personal business on company time. To avoid this, try to avoid or downplay any family chore discussion during the day or take care of it at lunch. If you have to take a few minutes to conduct personal business, try to split up and each do it separately.

      The same rules of behavior that apply in the office also apply at meetings. However, because meetings are a more formal setting, there is less flexibility for error. As an example, my husband and I attended an all day working meeting with the client. Towards the end of the day, my husband reached across the desk and took my can of coke. A shocked hush passed over the table, and people clutched their own coke cans protectively waiting to see how I would react. The other meeting attendees were not aware that we were married and did not know how to interpret his behavior.

      Behavior With Each Other

      Be sure and treat your spouse or significant other the same as you would any other co-worker. Over-familiarity often creates problems at the office. Couples should not assume that one will change priorities or loan resources to assist the other just because of their personal relationship. Couples should speak to each other with the same professional respect and courtesy that would be used with a co-worker. Have respect for your partner's time and do not assume that you have special rights to interrupt meetings etc. because of the relationship.

      De-Coupling Your Professional Image

      It is generally a good idea not to be seen as a matched set for all professional activities. Do not sit together at meetings on a regular basis. Develop different expertise and try not to always work together on the same project. Each of you needs to develop an individual professional image in the minds of your co-workers.

      Letting People Know

      Do not advertise your relationship or explain it without an initiating event. However, if someone asks or if a particular situation requires revealing this information, don't hide the information. I find that my co-workers generally point out the relationship long before I need to. Identify when you have a conflict of interest due to the relationship. If you have different last names, chances are that 80 percent of your business contacts will not be aware of the relationship. If you have the same last name, let them ask or draw their own conclusions.

      Remember the following tips to deal with the challenges of working with a spouse or significant other:

      • Recognize that perceived conflict can cause hiring bias and plan to overcome it
      • Behave in a professional manner both in the office and at meetings
      • Treat your spouse or significant other with the same professional respect that you give other co-workers
      • De-couple your professional image
      • Don't advertise or hide the relationship.

      2012 Region Conferences

      SWE Region Conferences are smaller, local versions of the SWE Annual Conference, where professional and collegiate members can gather to take part in workshops, networking, career fairs and technical tours. These conferences are closer to the local membership and thus, more affordable to attend. Each Region Conference has its own flavor, but all have similar events and opportunities for attendees and sponsors.

      For a closer look at 2011 regional conferences, click on the links below.

      Region A
      February 29 - March 4, 2012
      Honolulu, HI
      Hosted by HI Professional Section
      FFI: Contact Allison Goodman

      Region B
      February 29 - March 4, 2012
      Honolulu, HI
      Hosted by HI Professional Section
      FFI: Contact Kerrie L. Greenfelder

      Region C
      Jan 27-29 2012
      Lubbock, TX
      Hosted by Texas Tech University
      FFI: Contact: Carol Bachman

      Region D
      March 2-4, 2012
      Charleston, SC
      Hosted by Lowcountry Section
      FFI: Contact Annmarie Connor

      Region E
      March 30 - April 1, 2012
      New York City
      Hosted by Columbia University
      FFI: Contact Heather Bernardin

      Region F

      March 3-4, 2012
      Boston, MA
      Hosted by MIT
      FFI: Contact Jeanne Trinko Mechler  

      Region G
      March 2-4, 2012
      Cincinnati, OH
      Hosted by University of Cincinnati
      FFI: Contact Jessica Rannow
       
      Region H

      February 17-19, 2012
      Madison, WI
      Hosted by University of Wisconsin
      FFI: Contact Wendy Schauer Landwehr

      Region I
      March 2-3, 2012
      Tulsa, OK
      Hosted by Tulsa Section
      FFI: Heather Doty  

      Region J
      February 29 - March 4, 2012
      Honolulu, HI
      Hosted by HI Profesional Section
      FFI: Contact Wendy L. Obenauf

      For more information on general SWE region and section activities please contact the Director of Regions, Linda Thomas.

       

      Washington Spotlight April 2008

      SWE Co-Sponsors Congressional Visit Visit Day 2008

      SWE recently joined with the Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) Working Group, a coalition of some 30 professional societies, to co-sponsor Congressional Visit Day (CVD) 2008 that was held March 4-5, 2008 in Washington, D.C.  CVD 2008 is a two-day annual event bringing engineers, scientists, researchers, educators, and technology executives to Washington, D.C. to show support for issues related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).  SWE Past President Peggy Layne, P.E., and SWE Title IX Lead Cathy Pieronek attended the event on behalf of SWE, accompanied by SWE Washington representative Melissa Carl.

      On March 4th, CVD began with an informational briefing that was held at the headquarters of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).  Briefing speakers included: Dr. James Turner, Acting Director, National Institute for Standards and Technology; Dr. Mike Holland, Program Examiner, Energy Branch of the White House Office of Management and Budget; and Dr. Kathryn Clay, Professional Staff Member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources.  Dr. Turner provided attendees with an overview of the budget priorities of NIST’s FY 2009 budget request, while Drs. Holland and Clay discussed with attendees the importance of a clear message in support of STEM issues on Capitol Hill and at federal agencies.

      A reception was held that evening for House Science and Technology Committee Chairman Bart Gordon (D-TN), who was presented with the George E. Brown, Jr. Award for Science-Engineering-Technology Leadership for his work in the passage of the America COMPETES Act, a bipartisan measure which authorizes increases for STEM programs.  CVD 2008 then began the next day with a breakfast that featured former Chairman of the House Science and Technology Committee Sherwood Boehlert, a long-time advocate for STEM issues, and concluded with the Congressional visits. 

      More information about CVD 2008 can be found at: http://www.setcvd.org/cvd2008/index.html

      Coalition Calls on Congress to Support Stem Education 

      SWE recently joined the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education Coalition signing onto letters calling on Congress to support STEM Education at two key federal agencies.

      In a letter to the Chair and Ranking Member of the House Appropriations Labor, Health and Human Services and Education Subcommittee, the Coalition expressed its support for the Department of Education’s Math and Science Partnership (MSP) program. “Current math and science programs with proven results—such as the Math and Science Partnerships—are an integral part of federal efforts to strengthen STEM education.  Funding the MSP program at the fully authorized level of $450 million will allow states to provide more research-based reform initiatives to enhance teacher content knowledge and increase student achievement in these areas.” The letter also expressed support for the Math Now initiative authorized by the America COMPETES Act.

      A separate letter, to the Chair and Ranking Member of the House Appropriations Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies Subcommittee, expressed the Coalition’s strong support for increased investment in NSF’s Education and Human Resources (EHR) Directorate. “We are writing in support of the Administration’s request of $6.85 billion in fiscal year 2009 for the National Science Foundation (NSF).  However, we are concerned that, while the Administration’s budget request provides substantial resources for the NSF, it also falls short in providing the funding authorized by the broadly supported and overwhelmingly bi-partisan America COMPETES Act for NSF’s Education and Human Resources (EHR) Directorate and its efforts to foster improvements in K-12, undergraduate, graduate, continuing education, vocational, and informal STEM education.”

      Both STEM Education Coalition letters will be available in the near future on the Public Policy page.

       

      NSF Reports Indicate Growth in the Science and Engineering Workforce

      New data from NSF indicate that the number of individuals in the science and engineering (S&E) workforce grew by 4.3 percent between 2003 and 2006, while unemployment in the S&E workforce fell to 2.5 percent in 2006. The data was obtained through three national surveys that conducted every two years: the National Survey of College Graduates, the National Survey of Recent College Graduates, and the Survey of Doctoral Recipients.  Collectively, these surveys are known as the Scientists and Engineers Statistical Data System, or SESTAT.

      "The NSF data tell one side of the story - the supply side, and do not reflect information about the future or current demand for scientists and engineers," says Nimmi Kannankutty, NSF program manager responsible for compiling the data. "On the supply side, we can say that the current S&E labor force is expanding, new graduates are coming out, and people are able to find employment, or are continuing their education." 

      While these statistics reflect the labor market as of 2006, it is important to note they are not representative of the current status of the S&E workforce.  The next round of SESTAT surveys of scientists and engineers will begin in the fall of 2008.

      More information about these three NSF reports is available at:  http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=111369&org=NSF&from=news

       

       

      Leadership - Audit Comittee

      Audit Committee

      Committee Description

      The Audit Committee shall be composed of at least three members, at least one of whom shall be a voting member of the Council, and none of whom may be serving as treasurer or be an employee of the Society. The Audit Committee is responsible for:

      • Selecting and recommending to the board an auditor who may not be contracted by SWE for any other functions other than auditing and tax preparation services,
      • Directing the staff to prepare the information for the audit,
      • Reviewing the audit and working with the Auditor to resolve issues,
      • Reporting to the Board of Directors on the process, outcome, and any committee recommendations,
      • Investigating financial issues raised by SWE members and others.

      About SWE - Leadership - Collegiate Leadership

      Collegiate Leadership Coaching Committee

      The Collegiate Leadership Coaching Committee (formerly known as Student Section Vitality Task Force) provides proactive leadership coaching to SWE collegiate section leadership.  Trained Collegiate Leadership Coaches provide the coaching and support essential to developing the leadership and management skills which maintain healthy, vital, and growing collegiate sections.  Training modules on various aspects of SWE operations, and/or necessary leadership and management skills for SWE success, are delivered to individual sections at the local level, and to groups of sections together at region summits, region conferences, and the Society Annual Conference.

      About SWE - Leadership - Gov Relations

      Government Relations and Public Policy

      The Government Relations and Public Policy (GRPP) Committee educates members about public policy matters relevant to women in engineering, provides tools that allow members to participate in public policy discussions and educates other professional societies and policy makers on matters relevant to women in engineering.  The GRPP committee chair works closely with the SWE Washington Representative.

      Learning Needs

      Whether you have just started your career or have more than 20 years of experience on the job it is important that you continually understand and identify your learning needs. SWE places an emphasis on lifelong learning and provides professional development programming for a variety of different audiences within the membership. Over the next year, SWE will host a number of resources that can help members identify their strengths and weaknesses in the areas of leadership and career development. With a better understanding of career and leadership development, SWE members can more effectively position themselves for advancement within their respective organizations and overall career track.

      PD Corporate - Webinars

      Webinars

      SWE Corporate Webinars are categorized by subject area, so that you can find the topics most relevant to your needs. Enjoy 60 minutes of quality instruction by an industry expert—FREE for SWE members and $49 for non-members (unless otherwise noted).

      Click here to view webinars.

      K-12 Outreach
      SWE strives to provide members with the tools to be effective outreach practitioners. The K-12 Outreach subject area is comprised of Webinars that highlight many of the best practices used in engineering outreach today. Listen to the experts talk about existing networks of practitioners, share experiences, and initiate new collaborative projects across regions and organizations. This program track is part of SWE’s commitment to supporting outreach practitioners by giving them the tools to run effective programs that encourage and support girls to pursue a career in the field of engineering.
      By attending these Webinars you will be able to:

      • Discuss hot topics in K-12 outreach
      • Recognize effective methods in measuring program outcomes
      • Evaluate K-12 outreach program curricula
      • Recruit and train other outreach volunteers

      Governance
      By attending these webinars, you will receive training related to SWE governance activities.

      Innovation in Business and Technology
      Webinars in the Innovation in Technology and Business subject area provide current information on new trends in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Thought leaders from a variety of disciplines share techniques, best practices, and general instructions on how to make your organization or project team more dynamic in the global marketplace.

      By attending these Webinars you will be able to:

      • Evaluate new trends and hot topics in engineering
      • Incorporate techniques and best practices to make your organization more innovative and competitive
      • Be a more effective leader of innovative initiatives

      Leadership, Management & Strategy
      The Leadership, Management and Strategy Webinars focus on how the decisions of managers and leaders shape the performance and success of their organizations. These sessions should provide guidance on rigorous thinking devoted to strategic planning and leading your organization or project team. The sessions spotlight aspects of organizational behavior, market structure and forces, and organizational design; and explore the character and challenges of successful women leaders within highly technical fields. By taking multiple sessions within this track, participants will develop new skills and hone current ones that will ultimately prepare and equip them to be more effective leaders.

      By attending sessions within this track you will be able to:

      • Develop a greater capacity to grow as professionals within STEM fields
      • More successfully meet the myriad opportunities, challenges and demands of your profession
      • Develop new skills and hone current skills that will make you a more effective manager and leader

      Inclusion & Cultural Awareness
      SWE’s Webinars in Inclusion and Cultural Awareness  address the challenges and opportunities that women face in STEM within the context of diversity, globalization and culture.

      By attending these Webinars you will be able to:

      • Recognize the hot topics concerning workplace diversity and globalization
      • Develop skills to be a more inclusive leader and team member
      • Build a culture of inclusion within your organization

      Career Development & Work/Life Balance
      SWE’s Webinars in the Career Development and Work/Life Balance subject area address a variety of issues that women in STEM face on a personal and professional level. Participants will be able to develop techniques to better maintain work/life balance, and successfully manage and prepare for the various professional and life transitions ahead of them. Most importantly, many of the Webinars will help participants at all different stages of their life create concrete plans for their future as a woman and engineer.

      By attending these Webinars you will be able to:

      • Develop techniques to better maintain work/life balance
      • Better understand how to manage the various professional and life transitions
      • Develop and refine plans for future transitions

      PD Collegiate - Webinars

      Webinars

      SWE Collegiate Webinars are categorized by subject area, so that you can find the topics most relevant to your needs. Enjoy 60 minutes of quality instruction by an industry expert—FREE for SWE members and $49 for non-members (unless otherwise noted).

      Click here to view webinars.

      Governance
      By attending these webinars, you will receive training related to SWE governance activities.

      Leadership, Management and Strategy
      The Leadership, Management and Strategy Webinars focus on how the decisions of managers and leaders shape the performance and success of their organizations. These sessions should provide guidance on rigorous thinking devoted to strategic planning and leading your organization or project team. The sessions spotlight aspects of organizational behavior, market structure and forces, and organizational design; and explore the character and challenges of successful women leaders within highly technical fields. By taking multiple sessions within this track, participants will develop new skills and hone current ones that will ultimately prepare and equip them to be more effective leaders.

      By attending sessions within this track you will be able to:

      • Develop a greater capacity to grow as professionals within STEM fields
      • More successfully meet the myriad opportunities, challenges and demands of your profession
      • Develop new skills and hone current skills that will make you a more effective manager and leader

      Career Development and Work/Life Balance
      SWE’s Webinars in the Career Development and Work/Life Balance subject area address a variety of issues that women in STEM face on a personal and professional level. Participants will be able to develop techniques to better maintain work/life balance, and successfully manage and prepare for the various professional and life transitions ahead of them. Most importantly, many of the Webinars will help participants at all different stages of their life create concrete plans for their future as a woman and engineer.

      By attending these Webinars you will be able to:

      • Develop techniques to better maintain work/life balance
      • Better understand how to manage the various professional and life transitions
      • Develop and refine plans for future transitions

      Webinars (updated)

      Webinars

      • 60 minutes of quality instruction by an expert
      • Online curriculum designed for skill building
      • Free to members and moderately priced for non-members
      • Facilitated interaction with the expert
      • Knowledge resources and customized take-aways
      • Dynamic learning experience without leaving your desk 

      By registering for any of these webinars, you agree to SWE's Term of Use Agreement.

      Career Development

      Webinar Title  Audience  Date
      Mentoring Across Generations: Help! I’m Mentoring A Millenial, What Do I Do? (Part 4) Professionals & Corporate Partners 12/15/2010
      Being An Effective Mentor: What Is My Role and How Can I Help Mentee? (Part 3) Professionals & Corporate Partners 12/07/2010
      Leveraging the Mentor Relationship: How to Get the Most from the Relationship and Find Sponsors, Coaches and Peer Partners (Part 2) Professionals & Corporate Partners 11/11/2010
      Finding a Mentor: How to Find the Right Mentor for You and Create the Foundation of an Effective Mentoring Relationship (Part 1) Professionals & Corporate Partners 10/27/2010
      What to Do and Say to Build Trust and Attract Opportunity (Part 2 of Make Your Contacts Count) Professionals & Corporate Partners 12/02/2010
      How the Rituals of Meeting and Greeting Build Your Network (Part 1 of Make Your Contacts Count) Professionals & Corporate Partners 11/18/2010
      Collaboratively Negotiating for the Compensation You Deserve Series (Part 2) Professionals, Corporate Partners & Collegians 02/25/2010
      Collaboratively Negotiating for the Compensation You Deserve Series (Part 1) Professionals, Corporate Partners & Collegians 02/11/2010
      Five Strategies for Career Futuring Series (Part 3) Professionals, Corporate Partners & Collegians 03/19/2009
      Five Strategies for Career Futuring Series (Part 2) Professionals, Corporate Partners & Collegians 02/26/2009
      Five Strategies for Career Futuring Series (Part 1) Professionals, Corporate Partners & Collegians 02/12/2009
      Four Secrets to Finding the Perfect Job Professionals & Corporate Partners 04/03/2008
      The Secret to Career Acceleration: Enjoying the Stretch Zone Professionals & Corporate Partners 03/12/2008
      What You Should Know About Interacting with Executives Professionals & Corporate Partners 02/05/2008
      Executive Coaching: How it Can Boost Your Career Professionals & Corporate Partners 01/15/2008

      Inclusion & Cultural Awareness

      Webinar Title  Audience  Date
      Generations at Work Professionals & Corporate Partners 10/06/2010
      Little Things Mean A Lot: From Microinequities to Micro-Affirmations Professionals & Corporate Partners 09/30/2009
      The Glass Cieling for Asian Women in Engineering and Technology Professionals & Corporate Partners 04/29/2008
      Women Leading the Diversity Advantage Professionals & Corporate Partners 12/13/2007

      Governance

      Webinar Title  Audience  Date
      Training Webinar for MySWE Communities Professionals & Corporate Partners 07/29/2008

      Innovation in Technology

      Webinar Title  Audience  Date
      Hardwiring Sustainability into Your Organization's Business Strategy Professionals & Corporate Partners 05/13/2010
      Excelling as the Technical Guru Professionals & Corporate Partners 05/28/2008
      Analytical Tools for Engineers: Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) Professionals & Corporate Partners 05/13/2008
      Diverse Perspectives Drive Innovation Professionals & Corporate Partners 11/20/2008

      Leadership, Management and Strategy

      Webinar Title  Audience  Date
      Project Management Fundamentals Professionals & Corporate Partners 06/30/2011
      Retaining Women Engineers in Your Organization Professional & Corporate Partners 09/16/2010
      Strategic Crisis Management Professionals & Corporate Partners 05/27/2010
      Managing Global Teams Professionals & Corporate Partners 04/29/2010
      Communication Style: Power or Pitfall? Professionals & Corporate Partners 04/08/2010
      Delegating Authority Professionals & Corporate Partners 12/02/2009
      Collaborative Negotiation Series (Part 3) Professionals & Corporate Partners 11/17/2009
      Collaborative Negotiation Series (Part 2) Professionals & Corporate Partners 11/10/2009
      Collaborative Negotiation Series (Part 1) Professionals & Corporate Partners 10/29/2009
      Values Based Leadership Series (Part 3) Professionals & Corporate Partners 09/28/2009
      Values Based Leadership Series (Part 2) Professionals & Corporate Partners 09/21/2009
      Values Based Leadership Series (Part 1) Professionals & Corporate Partners 09/14/2009
      She Said/He Said: How to Understand and Leverage Communication Style Differences (Part 3) Professionals, Corporate Partners & Collegians 06/09/2009
      She Said/He Said: How to Understand and Leverage Communication Style Differences (Part 2) Professionals, Corporate Partners & Collegians 05/27/2009
      She Said/He Said: How to Understand and Leverage Communication Style Differences (Part 1) Professionals, Corporate Partners & Collegians 05/07/2009
      Gaining the Competitive Advantage Through Building a Strategic Network Professionals & Corporate Partners 09/18/2008
      Women's Way of Leadership: Being a Leader and Leaving a Legacy Professionals & Corporate Partners 12/04/2007

      Outreach

      Webinar Title  Audience  Date
      Increasing the Involvement of Girls and Female Mentors in FIRST Professionals & Corporate Partners 03/02/2010
      Wow! That's Engineering! Professionals & Corporate Partners 02/04/2010
      Engineers Week: SASS-E Girlz Professionals & Corporate Partners 02/17/2009

      Work/Life Balance

      Webinar Title  Audience  Date
      An Engineer's Perspective on Developing Work/Life Balance Strategy Professionals & Corporate Partners 03/11/2010
      Work/Life Effectiveness Series (Part 3: Take Control of Your Time) Professionals & Corporate Partners 01/22/2009
      Improving Your Emotional Intelligence Quotient (EQ) Series (Part 2) Professionals, Leaders & Corporate Partners 01/15/2009
      Work/Life Effectiveness Series (Part 2: Managing Workplace Stress) Professionals & Corporate Partners 01/08/2009
      Improving Your Emotional Intelligence Quotient (EQ) Series (Part 1) Professionals, Leaders & Corporate Partners 12/18/2008
      Work/Life Effectiveness Series (Part 1: Balancing Work and Life) Professionals & Corporate Partners 12/11/2008

      Career Resources

      Leverage Your Career Recruiting Efforts with Insights from an Expert
      Peter Weddle, a recruiter, HR consultant and business CEO, offers insight into leveraging the Career Center and creating a strong presence in his columns, Pluperfect Recruiting and Candidate Centric Recruiting.

      Pluperfect Recruiting shows employers how to use the Career Center to their best advantage through activities such as recruitment advertising and professional networking.

      Candidate Centric Recruiting offers ideas for creating strong and lasting impressions with job seekers, so that your organization stands out.

      Easily Find Qualified Candidates in Your Niche
      More frequently, employers are turning to niche job boards such as the SWE Career Center to get direct access to a focused group of qualified talent specific to your industry.  The Career Center makes it easy:

      Resume Agent: Receive an automatic email notification whenever candidates match your specific requirements. Resume agents streamline your recruiting and save you time and effort.

      Easy Online Management: Enter job descriptions, check the status of postings, renew or discontinue postings, and even make payments online. You can also monitor the traffic to your listings and gain valuable insight on the quality of your leads to help you make optimum use of your job posting dollar.

      Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
      A new research report by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) explains why there are so few women scientists and engineers.  Read more.

      Women Hit the Sweet Spot on Corporate Boards
      New regulations, growing vacancies and emerging demands converge to give women growing opportunities on corporate boards. Read more from SWE Magazine's spring edition.

      The National Science Board Releases 2010 Science and Engineering Indicators
      Review the 2010 Science and Engineering Indicators for statistical data and trends related to the science and engineering enterprise.

      Career Resources

      Become an Irresistible Job Candidate with Insights from Renowned Recruiter

      Peter Weddle, a recruiter, HR consultant and business CEO, offers insight into finding a job in his columns, The 50-50 Job Search and The Application Two-Step.

       

      The 50-50 Job Search focuses on making your job search 50 percent of the effort, while transforming yourself into an irresistible candidate makes up the remaining 50 percent. Weddle provides a three-step process that will help you do the latter.

      The Application Two-Step offers job seekers a new method of applying for jobs, starting with the fact that simply sending in your resume will not secure you the job of your dreams.

       
       

       

      Find Your Dream Job with the Career Center

      • Free and confidential resume posting: Make your resume available to employers in the engineering industry, confidentially if you choose
      • Job search control: Quickly and easily find relevant industry job listings and sign up for automatic email notification of new jobs that match your criteria
      • Easy job application: Apply online and create a password-protected account for managing your job search
      • Saved jobs capability: Save up to 100 jobs to a folder in your account, so you can easily apply whenever you are ready

      Visit the Career Center today to post your resume and search for jobs.

       

      The Habits of a Highly Effective Job Seeker

       

      Set Realistic Goals for Yourself

      As a highly qualified candidate competing for a shrinking number of jobs, how can you effectively deal with the intense competition without becoming discouraged? Begin by setting realistic expectations and goals.

      Write a Resume That Gets You in the Door

      Your resume is a tool with one specific purpose: to obtain an interview. To ensure your resume is effective, enlist a friend or colleague to review it. They may be able to point out potential deal breakers, as well as offer ideas to enhance your resume.

      Re-evaluate Your Approach

      Examine what you've been good at in the past, understand where you are today and set goals for tomorrow. Establish habits that will reposition you as a sincere candidate interested in building a career rather than simply landing a job.

       

      Pick Up the Habits of a Highly Effective Job Seeker

      • Be Specific: Make sure your resume and relevant skills match the opportunity
      • Be Honest: Stretching the truth is never a good idea and often times will be uncovered
      • Be Precise: Check and re-check your resume and cover letter
      • Be Polite: Make sure the employer can tell you are interested, qualified and available
      • Be Respectful: Sincerity and humility stand out in a sea of resumes
      • Be Responsive: Employers expect interested candidates to be prompt and punctual

      Begin today by updating your resume on the SWE Career Center!

       

      Save Time When You Job Search by Managing Saved Jobs

       

      Job searching can be time consuming. Streamline the process with "saved jobs." You can scan, pick, save and apply. With your resume posted on the SWE Job Board, you get another added bonus of not having to search again for the jobs you may not have had time to apply for or research further.

       

      Learning Needs

      Whether you have just started your career or have more than 20 years of experience on the job, it is important that you continually understand and identify your learning needs. SWE places an emphasis on lifelong learning and provides professional development programming for a variety of different audiences within the membership. Over the next year, SWE will host a number of resources that can help members identify their strengths and weaknesses in the areas of leadership and career development. With a better understanding of career and leadership development, SWE members can more effectively position themselves for advancement within their respective organizations and overall career track.

      SWE Magazine Articles

      SWE Magazine helps carry out the Society’s mission by keeping our members informed and in touch with the world of women in engineering. Our Career Toolbox articles and other features provide insightful commentary and advice on building your career in engineering and technology. 

      Women Hit the Sweet Spot on Corporate Boards (Spring 2010)

      Overcoming Analysis Paralysis (Winter 2010)   

      Finding Your Voice (Spring 2009): By Identifying Your Core Values and using the tools in the described in the article you can handle whatever comes your way.

      Mentoring:  Paying It Forward (Winter 2009)

      Transforming Obstacles Into Opportunities (Fall 2009): Obstacles and setbacks can ultimately become stepping stones to greater growth and fulfillment.

      Reading the Political Tea Leaves (Winter 2008): Understanding workplace dynamics is an essential component of career development. 

      The Off-On Ramp Revolution (Winter 2008): Flexible work options keep talented women from exiting corporate America. 

      Standout through Service (Fall 2008): Volunteer and Co-Op experiences provide technical and leadership opportunities (Podcast available). 

      An Opportunity Out of the Blue (Summer 2008): Reflections on my assignment in the United Kingdom. 

      What Work/Life Balance Means to Me (and SWE) (Spring 2008): Moving beyond its roots as a mom’s issue, work/life balance applies to everyone.

      People Physics 101 (Spring 2008): Being able to work with a variety of personalities determines a project’s success as much as technical acumen.

      How Do Women Engineers Bridge the Generation Gap? (Spring 2008): Through the differences between boomers and millennials make negative headlines, the realities can be positive. 

      A Greener America = New Growth Fields for Engineers (Winter 2008): As sustainability becomes a priority, engineers are discovering unique opportunities to innovate. 

      Transferring Leadership Skills From SWE to Your Career (Spring 2007)

      For Sale: Your Knowledge, Expertise and Intellectual Capital (Winter 2007): Consulting is not for everyone, but for women engineers it can be a rewarding career on many levels.

      Hostile Work Environments are Still Alive and Well for Women Engineers (Summer 2007): We need more than a positive attitude to deal with harsh realities.

      Planning for Evaluation Day (Fall 2006): How to take measures throughout an internship or the work year to ensure your efforts are acknowledged and appreciated.   

       

      Partner Resources

      Partner Resources

      Forte Foundation

      Forté Foundation is a consortium of major corporations and top business schools that has become a powerful change agent in educating and directing talented women toward leadership roles in business.
      Their mission is to substantially increase the number of women business leaders by increasing the flow of women into key educational gateways and business networks. Click here to learn more.

      UCLA Extension's Technical Management Program

      Started in 1955, UCLA Extension's Technical Management Program provides new and seasoned managers in technical and other fields with the tools and knowledge to become inspiring leaders and enhance their personal and organizational skills.

      Participants create their own personalized program by choosing four courses from a selection of 25 in the areas of strategic planning, team building, communication, creative thinking and project management. This one-week program is offered in March and September each year, and is continuously updated with the help of an advisory board of industry leaders and feedback from participants of the program. The program has served major organizations like Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Northrop Grumman, Boeing, Symantec, Beckman Coulter, ExxonMobil, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, DirecTV, Chevron and many more. More than 15,000 people from around the world have attended the program in the past 55 years.

      The program offers a working retreat on the beautiful UCLA campus. Away from work and other distractions, participants focus on enhancing leadership skills, learning the latest business trends and paradigms, and discovering new ways to solve problems, plan strategies and motivate colleagues.

      Click here for the complete program description.

      SWE members receive a 15 percent discount off the regular program price.

      Wi$eUp

      In partnership with the U.S. Department of Labor Women’s Bureau, SWE members now have exclusive access to the Wi$eUp portal, which is a financial planning program designed for Generation X & Y women. Its goals are to promote financial security through online education and to encourage responsible saving habits for future retirement. It was developed by the U.S. Department of Labor Women's Bureau in support of the Department of Labor's Strengthening the Family Initiative. The Wi$eUp curriculum was developed by Texas AgriLife Extension Service under contract with the Women's Bureau

      Click here to learn more.

      iRelaunch

      On a career break and considering returning to work? 

      Register now to participate in one of the Career Relaunch Forums. These events are produced by the career re-entry programming company, iRelaunch, whose founders are the authors of acclaimed career re-entry strategy book, Back on the Career Track. Sponsored by prestigious employers, the program includes a compelling lineup of speakers, panelists, workshops and networking time with sponsors. SWE members receive a $30 discount off the Forum registration fee. Type SWE in the "How did you find out about us?" box on the online registration form, and you will receive a $30 credit within 48 hours. Click here for more information and to register.

      Smith College Executive Education -- From Specialist to Strategist

      You won't find a program like this, specifically designed for women, anywhere else. So what are you waiting for?

      This five-day strategic leadership program for women in science, technology and engineering features classes, seminars, panels with practitioners from a range of technical firms and corporations, a personal wellness program, as well as networking and coaching opportunities. Participants engage in informal sessions with guest speakers and women executives sharing candid practical strategies for how women can most effectively leverage their strengths to be top performers.

      Away from the stresses of daily life on the beautiful Smith College campus, participants find a reflective mind/body/spirit approach to negotiating the critical work/life choices faced by all women today.

      After the program, participants join a group of thousands of executive women, linked by e-newsletters, informative business teleforums, online networking capabilities and other services and resources.

      Click here to learn more.

      Career Resources

      Leverage Your Career Recruiting Efforts with Insights from an Expert
      Peter Weddle, a recruiter, HR consultant and business CEO, offers insight into leveraging the Career Center and creating a strong presence in his columns, Pluperfect Recruiting and Candidate Centric Recruiting.

      Pluperfect Recruiting shows employers how to use the Career Center to their best advantage through activities such as recruitment advertising and professional networking.

      Candidate Centric Recruiting offers ideas for creating strong and lasting impressions with job seekers, so that your organization stands out.

      Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
      A new research report by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) explains why there are so few women scientists and engineers.  Read more.

      Women Hit the Sweet Spot on Corporate Boards
      New regulations, growing vacancies and emerging demands converge to give women growing opportunities on corporate boards. Read more from SWE Magazine's spring edition.

      The National Science Board Releases 2010 Science and Engineering Indicators
      Review the 2010 Science and Engineering Indicators for statistical data and trends related to the science and engineering enterprise.

      Partner Resources

      Forte Foundation

      Forté Foundation is a consortium of major corporations and top business schools that has become a powerful change agent in educating and directing talented women toward leadership roles in business.

      Their mission is to substantially increase the number of women business leaders by increasing the flow of women into key educational gateways and business networks. Click here to learn more.

      UCLA Extension's Technical Management Program

      Started in 1955, UCLA Extension's Technical Management Program provides new and seasoned managers in technical and other fields with the tools and knowledge to become inspiring leaders and enhance their personal and organizational skills.

      Participants create their own personalized program by choosing four courses from a selection of 25 in the areas of strategic planning, team building, communication, creative thinking and project management. This one-week program is offered in March and September each year, and is continuously updated with the help of an advisory board of industry leaders and feedback from participants of the program. The program has served major organizations like Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Northrop Grumman, Boeing, Symantec, Beckman Coulter, ExxonMobil, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, DirecTV, Chevron and many more. More than 15,000 people from around the world have attended the program in the past 55 years.

      The program offers a working retreat on the beautiful UCLA campus. Away from work and other distractions, participants focus on enhancing leadership skills, learning the latest business trends and paradigms, and discovering new ways to solve problems, plan strategies and motivate colleagues.

      Click here for the complete program description.

      SWE members receive a 15 percent discount off the regular program price.

      Wi$eUp

      In partnership with the U.S. Department of Labor Women’s Bureau, SWE members now have exclusive access to the Wi$eUp portal, which is a financial planning program designed for Generation X & Y women. Its goals are to promote financial security through online education and to encourage responsible saving habits for future retirement. It was developed by the U.S. Department of Labor Women's Bureau in support of the Department of Labor's Strengthening the Family Initiative. The Wi$eUp curriculum was developed by Texas AgriLife Extension Service under contract with the Women's Bureau

      Click here to learn more.

      Smith College Executive Education -- From Specialist to Strategist

      You won't find a program like this, specifically designed for women, anywhere else. So what are you waiting for?

      This five-day strategic leadership program for women in science, technology and engineering features classes, seminars, panels with practitioners from a range of technical firms and corporations, a personal wellness program, as well as networking and coaching opportunities. Participants engage in informal sessions with guest speakers and women executives sharing candid practical strategies for how women can most effectively leverage their strengths to be top performers.

      Away from the stresses of daily life on the beautiful Smith College campus, participants find a reflective mind/body/spirit approach to negotiating the critical work/life choices faced by all women today.

      After the program, participants join a group of thousands of executive women, linked by e-newsletters, informative business teleforums, online networking capabilities and other services and resources.

      Click here to learn more.

      Leadership Competency Model

       

      Competency ModelSWE’s leadership competency model was created through member interviews along with a survey of current SWE leaders and those involved in training SWE leaders. The data collected from these interviews and surveys helped us find themes of what is valued amongst the membership regarding leadership. The model was largely developed with the intention of guiding our professional development of future and current leaders within SWE. As SWE continues to grow its professional development program, the competency model will serve as the basis for developing leadership skill-sets. In addition to informing our process of developing leadership curricula, the competency model will be used to help members reflect and assess where they may need to hone their leadership skills. The leadership model as it currently stands consists of four areas:

      • Leadership Abilities
      • Communication
      • Business Knowledge & Management
      • Self Management

      Each of these four categories includes several specific leadership competencies that a SWE leader should strive to learn. The competencies, or skills, that they learn and hone will serve them well as leaders within SWE and also within their careers.

      One high-level goal is for the skills that members develop through our professional development programs to be transferable to the workplace. This is where SWE provides value for our membership.

       

      Business Knowledge & Management

      SWE leadership competency model statement on Business Knowledge & Management:
      • Strategic planning through the development of effective strategies consistent with the mission of SWE. Sees the big picture and understands how to determine organizational objectives and set priorities.
      • Manage finances of SWE to meet organizational needs.
      • Apply effective management skills (e.g., problem solving, interpersonal skills, delegation and supervision).
      • Professional knowledge and skills by being aware of industry changes, developments and emerging issues affecting women in STEM.

      Self-Management & Development

      SWE leadership competency model statement Self-Management & Development:
      • Pursuit of lifelong learning through the mastery of new knowledge, embracing new ideas, and shares new ideas.
      • Self-reflection and assessment through recognizing strengths and weaknesses, seeks feedback from others and learns from failure.
      • Tolerates ambiguity by taking priority changes and unforeseen developments in stride as well as leads with a firm sense of purpose in an environment of uncertainty.
      • Flexibility by being open to change and new information/perspectives.

      Leadership Abilities

      SWE leadership competency model statement on Leadership Abilities:
      • Developing and empowering others.
      • Visioning by taking the long view of the organization, building a shared vision for SWE members’ role, acting as a catalyst for organizational change, and inspiring others to succeed within SWE.
      • Provide and support an environment for continuous improvement.
      • Promote and support appropriate change as an essential part of SWE’s success as an organization.
      • Maintain a high standard of professionalism and ethics.
      • Be an advocate for the role of women in STEM.
      • Results oriented through delivering on strategic goals.
      • Evidence based decision making; using the best evidence available in making decisions that impact the organization.
      • Taking initiative and making smart risks through the encouragement of creative. Thinking, supporting and guiding new ideas, and empowering others to take risks.
      • Knowledgeable of change management strategies and processes.
      • Visioning by taking the long view of the organization, building a shared vision for SWE members’ role, acting as a catalyst for organizational change, and inspiring others to succeed within SWE.
      • Leverages diversity and differences by leading and supporting an inclusive environment.Seeks new perspectives to achieve the vision and mission.
      • Influencing others through coalition building, inviting new perspectives, an clearly articulating the goals of SWE
      • Identify and collaborate with internal partners.
      • Identify and collaborate with external partners
      • Build relationships that support SWE’s mission and strategic objectives
      • Apply effective communication and interpersonal skills through actively listening to the needs of colleagues, sharing relevant information and expectations, and testing colleagues with respect.

      Communication

      SWE leadership competency model statement on Communication

      • Communicate plans and activities in a manner that supports strategies for teamwork.
      • Conflict resolution and management by skillfully settling differences in a positive and constructive manner.
      • Leverages diversity and differences by leading and supporting an inclusive environment. Seeks new perspectives to achieve the vision and mission of SWE.
      • Influencing others through coalition building, inviting new perspectives, and clearly articulating the goals of SWE.
      • Identify and collaborate with internal partners
      • Identify and collaborate with external partners.
      • Build relationships that support SWE's mission and strategic objectives.
      • Apply effective communication and interpersonal skills through actively listening to the needs of colleagues, sharing relevant information and expectations, and treating colleagues with respect.

      Learning Needs

      SWE places an emphasis on lifelong learning and provides professional development programming for a variety of different audiences within the membership. Over the next year, SWE will host a number of resources that can help members identify their strengths and weaknesses in the areas of leadership and career development. With a better understanding of career and leadership development, SWE members can more effectively position themselves for advancement within their respective organizations and overall career track. 

      Collegiate Leadership Coaching

      The Society of Women Engineers is committed to establishing engineering as a highly desirable career for women and providing the mentoring and training/development opportunities to build our members’ confidence and success as they advance in the profession.

      At the collegiate level, SWE works with a number of sections on campuses around the country to support leadership training through the Student Collegiate Leadership Curriculum program. The program was designed to identify and address those areas of most relevance to our collegiate members, particularly those serving in section leadership positions as well as those approaching matriculation and entering the workforce.

      Each program module focuses on a key competency area, ranging from active listening and communication to strategic planning and fundraising. The programs are presented by a member of SWE’s Collegiate Leadership Coaching Committee (CLCC), someone who has had experience as a section officer and who has committed to completing additional training to qualify as a participant in the program.

      The modules tend to focus on one of two areas:

      1. Organizational management: how to govern and expand your local section
      2. Personal leadership: how to develop your own individual skills

      A complete list of module topics appears below.

      • Dealing with Leadership Burnout
      • Leadership
      • Building Teams
      • Building Membership
      • Fund Development
      • Effective Personal Communications
      • Women in Engineering
      • You’re in SWE, Now What?
      • Managing Effective Meetings
      • Hit the Ground Running – Transitioning from College to Career
      • Strategic and Tactical Planning
      • Event Planning
      • Officer Training

      The program has been generously underwritten by Agilent Technologies. As such, the workshops/presentations are done at no cost to the section.

      Since its inception, well over a thousand student members have attended one or more sessions. The average ranking is 4.6 out of 5, testifying to the immense value of the program. See what other officers/members are saying about these programs.

      "The executive board in our collegiate section is constantly looking for new, fun ways to build and retain our membership. The session on Building Membership provided great insight into new strategies for the executive board to utilize and implement.

      The CLCC made it extremely easy for our SWE section to improve strategies on building membership. Their flexibility and willingness to work with our section's schedule provides a wonderful opportunity for us to learn new techniques guaranteed to help with a vast range of topics. The CLCC is truly a SWE library on wheels!"

      Debra Lin
      Mechanical Engineering
      Purdue University
      Outgoing Collegiate President, Society of Women Engineers

      Once a section hosts any one of the program topics, the participants are invited to join our online community to continue to tap coaching advice and best practices.

      If your section is interested in learning more about hosting a workshop, please contact Laura Iannacci at laura.iannacci@gmail.com. We are quickly booking up for the 2010-2011 school year.

       

      Career Resources

      Become an Irresistible Job Candidate with Insights from Renowned Recruiter

      Peter Weddle, a recruiter, HR consultant and business CEO, offers insight into finding a job in his columns, The 50-50 Job Search and The Application Two-Step.

      The 50-50 Job Search focuses on making your job search 50 percent of the effort, while transforming yourself into an irresistible candidate makes up the remaining 50 percent. Weddle provides a three-step process that will help you do the latter.

      The Application Two-Step offers job seekers a new method of applying for jobs, starting with the fact that simply sending in your resume will not secure you the job of your dreams.


      Find Your Dream Job with the Career Center

      • Free and confidential resume posting: Make your resume available to employers in the engineering industry, confidentially if you choose
      • Job search control: Quickly and easily find relevant industry job listings and sign up for automatic email notification of new jobs that match your criteria
      • Easy job application: Apply online and create a password-protected account for managing your job search
      • Saved jobs capability: Save up to 100 jobs to a folder in your account, so you can easily apply whenever you are ready


      Visit the Career Center today to post your resume and search for jobs.


      The Habits of a Highly Effective Job Seeker

      Set Realistic Goals for Yourself

      As a highly qualified candidate competing for a shrinking number of jobs, how can you effectively deal with the intense competition without becoming discouraged? Begin by setting realistic expectations and goals.

      Write a Resume That Gets You in the Door

      Your resume is a tool with one specific purpose: to obtain an interview. To ensure your resume is effective, enlist a friend or colleague to review it. They may be able to point out potential deal breakers, as well as offer ideas to enhance your resume.

      Re-evaluate Your Approach

      Examine what you've been good at in the past, understand where you are today and set goals for tomorrow. Establish habits that will reposition you as a sincere candidate interested in building a career rather than simply landing a job.

      Pick Up the Habits of a Highly Effective Job Seeker

      • Be Specific: Make sure your resume and relevant skills match the opportunity
      • Be Honest: Stretching the truth is never a good idea and often times will be uncovered
      • Be Precise: Check and re-check your resume and cover letter
      • Be Polite: Make sure the employer can tell you are interested, qualified and available
      • Be Respectful: Sincerity and humility stand out in a sea of resumes
      • Be Responsive: Employers expect interested candidates to be prompt and punctual

      Begin today by updating your resume on the SWE Career Center!

       

      Save Time When You Job Search by Managing Saved Jobs

      Job searching can be time consuming. Streamline the process with "saved jobs." You can scan, pick, save and apply. With your resume posted on the SWE Job Board, you get another added bonus of not having to search again for the jobs you may not have had time to apply for or research further.

       

      BOD - Stedman

      Rachael Stedman

      Collegiate Director, FY11

      Lin_small.jpgRachael Stedman is working toward her electrical and computer engineering degree at Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, a private undergraduate college of approximately 300 students located in Needham, MA, and known for its project-based curriculum and gender balance. Becoming involved in SWE as a freshman, she assisted in organizing Olin College’s first hosting of the Region F Conference and served as section secretary and president. This past year, Stedman also served as regional collegiate representative for Region F.

      Growing up in Southern California, Stedman has always been passionate about being active in her community. In high school, Stedman volunteered through National Charity League, a mother-daughter philanthropic organization. She also founded an organization called Dance for the Community which brought dancers and musicians to local senior centers. Taking her first tap and ballet combo class at age two, Stedman continues to dance in college with the Babson Dance Ensemble and currently serves as the organization’s public relations officer. Stedman also enjoys desert landscapes, waterskiing, Emily Dickinson poetry, fascinating discussions about the future of technology, and fellow people with passion and motivation to change the world. Her academic interests include software engineering, interface design and graphic design. She is curious about how people interact with technology and how to improve that interaction.

      collegiate-director@swe.org

      About SWE - Leadership - Curriculum

      Curriculum Committee

      The Curriculum Committee is responsible for recommending topics and input for future professional development programming (outside of the annual conference). This includes:

      • Providing input on, and supporting academic professional development activities at the regional conferences, section events, and virtual training.
      • Advising on and supporting the development of new professional development programming for SWE by serving as the “voice” of the membership in determining new topics that will support different target audiences.
      • Bringing cohesion amongst the different committees working on professional development by maintaining high standards of quality and promote lifelong learning within SWE.
      • Keeping program tracks consistent across our training activities and events (objectives & outcomes defined) through the high-level review process.
      • Participating in the high level review of program evaluation data.

      The Curriculum committee will ensure individuals with the right skill set are evaluating the content of professional development programming. SWE is seeking avenues to be able to offer Continuing Education Units/Credits to members.  Part of the Society's ability to do this activity requires a group to review and manage curriculum content. This committee would fulfill that requirement.

      Newsletters 2011

      All Together Newsletters 

      The All Together newsletter features the latest Society and industry news on topics such as K-12 outreach, professional development and the SWE Annual Conference. The online, monthly newsletter is available to all SWE members.

      Read the latest edition of SWE’s e-newsletter, All Together. Issues are also archived by month and by category, starting with the April 2011 issue, and may be accessed on the lower right sidebar of the newsletter.

      The All Together newsletter is also published quarterly for CPC and Corporate members.

      All Together Newsletter

      CPC Member Quarterly Newsletter

      Stay tuned for Spring 2011 newsletter

      Corporate Member Quarterly Newsletter

      Stay tuned for Spring 2011 newsletter

       

      SWE History Landing Page

      The SWE Story... Our History, Our Legacy

      The SWE story is the history of the first society dedicated to the advancement of women in engineering - capturing pioneering experiences and celebrating groundbreaking accomplishments.

       

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      Visit Our Interactive Timeline!

      Learn the origins and history of the Society of Women Engineers! 

       

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      A Woman Engineer's Story

       


      "I worked on the Apollo proposal design and development. I think the Lunar Landing was the coup de grace for me. You wouldn't dream you could do that, and we did it."

       

      Barbara "Bobbie" Johnson,
         Aeronautical Engineer

       

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      Webinar: Managing Overwhelm

      Managing Overwhelm

      Click here to listen to this webinar series.

      Nowadays, engineers struggle with too much to do in too little time.  No wonder they feel overwhelmed!  This webinar series, “Managing Overwhelm” helps women engineers gain control of their work and life.  Part 1, Your Productivity Quotient, helps engineers become more productive in order to meet the increased demands at work.  Part 2, Strategies for Finding Balance, helps women engineers balance the demands of their work, family and community involvement.

      Part 1

      May 26, 2011; 4:00 pm CST

      After the downsizing of recent years, many employees are doing the jobs of two or even three people.  Employees feel pressured because they have too many tasks and not enough time.  This leaves them with a sense of frustration and overwhelm. 

      How can you become more productive in order to manage the increased demands of the workplace?  This webinar provides practical strategies and tips to increase your productivity at work.

      You will learn how to manage:

      • Your Body: Take care of your body so you can be at your best every day
      • Your Mind: Plan your work around your prime energy levels
      • Your Behavior: Employ time management techniques on a daily basis
      • Your Environment: Overcome time wasters in your external environment

      Part 2

      Thursday, June 2; 4:00 pm CST

      Are you feeling overwhelmed and overextended?  If so, you’re not alone.  According to a recent study, 88% of American employees struggle with balancing their work and personal lives.  The demands of work, family and other outside activities can put us into overload.  This webinar presents practical strategies for finding balance in a chaotic world. 

      You will be able to:

      • Clarify your values
      • Set goals in each important area of your life
      • Prioritize
      • Set boundaries
      • Take care of yourself
      • Get support
      • And utilize strategies to maintain balance
      This webinar series is generously sponsored by Abbott.

      About the Presenter:

      Kathleen Barton, MBA, is a keynote speaker, workshop presenter, and career/life coach specializing in work/life issues, including life balance, career management, stress and time management. Key clients include Hewlett-Packard Company, Nationwide Insurance, Pepsi-Cola, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Veterans Healthcare Administration, and Yahoo! Inc., among others.  Barton has over 20 years experience in human resource management and development.  She is the author of Connecting with Success, Finding Your Purpose and Passion in Life, and The Balancing Act: Managing Work & Life workbook.  Her work has been featured in numerous publications, including Business Week, The Executive, and The Wall Street Journal Online.

      Webinar: Managing Diverse Teams

      Managing Diverse and Dispersed Teams

      Tuesday, June 21, 2011; 4:00 - 5:00 pm CST
      Click here to register for this webinar.

      Why are some teams so creative while others simply rehash trite ideas? Why do some deliver results on time and on budget while others overspend and miss deadlines? Scientific studies show that enhancing a team's diversity can produce better solutions, but the data is mixed. While teams of women and men consistently deliver better solutions, diverse teams based on culture or beliefs can show better or worse results. What makes the difference? How the teams are run. And that's where you come in!

      Today’s global environment puts additional strain on teams. Once upon a time, leaders were taught to “manage by walking around.” But today, members may never see each other. How can a remote team leader inspire, communicate and assure delivery on commitments?

      This webinar will address

      • Choosing the right team for your project
      • Communicating across time zones and cultures
      • Inspiring the team
      • Techniques for fostering creativity
      • Techniques for "managing by walking around digitally"

      Every person working in a dispersed team and every team leader struggling with meeting commitments will benefit from this session.

      This webinar is generously sonsored by BAE.

      About the Presenter:

      Renee Weisman was a Distinguished Engineer and Director of Engineering at IBM Corporation prior to retiring in 2007. Her career included executive and technical leadership positions as well as a history of fostering women in technology. One of the first woman engineers, engineering managers and senior managers in the microelectronics division, Renee has over 40 years of experience in industry and education. She has led diverse organizations, largely male, to business and technical success.

      Renee is the author of Winning in a Man’s World: Advice for Women Who Want to Succeed and the Men Who Work With Them and the ebook, 5 Ways to Get a Man to Listen. Owner and Principal of Winning at Work, she has designed a variety of classes tailored to enhance women in their careers and to enable managers to better understand how to capitalize on the diversity of their organization. Renee is a featured writer for Excelle.monster.com, womensradio and for the Poughkeepsie Journal.

      Webinar: Leadership for Technologists

      Leadership for Technologists: Someone That Others Want to Follow

      Click here to listen to this webinar.

      What does it take to be an effective leader? What distinguishes a good leader from a great leader? The presenter, a seasoned manager, will address these questions and discuss strategies for honing your leadership style, inspiring and motivating your team(s), and effective mentoring.  Throughout the Web seminar, the presenter will draw on her own professional experiences to highlight characteristics of leadership.

      Learning Objectives

      • Mentoring staff through effective feedback delivery
      • Growing staff through delegating project tasks
      • Identifying opportunities for virtual work practices on your projects
      • Applying a consistent team on boarding framework

      Content of Presentation

      1. Leading and Developing Others
      2. Growing Junior Staff
      3. Providing Feedback – Tips from the Real World
      4. Motivating Staff
      5. Dealing with the Not-So-Good Times
      6. Virtual Work Practices
      7. Create a Culture of Quality
      8. Make It Everyone’s Job to Control Risk
      9. Managing Mixed Project Teams
      10. Taking the Time to Invest in Your People
      11. Team On boarding Framework
      12. Real World Examples
      13. Unconventional Tips

      This webinar is generously sponsored by ITT Corporation.

      About the Presenter:

      Lynn Rodriguez has been with Deloitte Consulting for 11 years, where she specializes in managing large, diverse teams through the entire systems development lifecycle. Lynn is also currently the Technology Nerve Center IP Factory Lead, responsible for assisting staff and leadership with the creation and publication of eminence and thoughtware. After graduating from the University of Pittsburgh's School of Engineering with a B.S. in engineering physics and a B.A. in Spanish, she has spent the majority of her career focused on large-scale systems integration work for Health and Human Services clients in the Public Sector.

      Webinar: The Electronic Dilemma

      The Electronic Dilemma: Has Technology Leaped Ahead of Our Ethics?

      Thursday, June 23, 2011; 4:00 pm CST
      Click here to register for this webinar.

      As technology continues to evolve at neck breaking speed, what of our ethics? With technological advances, have we forsaken organizational morals for speed? Do the old values really matter anymore? Could they, in fact, be more important than ever? When many workers today are uncertain about electronic “etiquette”, have they entirely lost sight of the bigger question of ethics? In this presentation participants will explore these questions as well as how corporate responsibility has morphed_ for good or bad _ in the new millennium. We will examine why this matters, and who could potentially be your organization’s gatekeeper on this issue.

      Learning Objectives:

      • Evaluate current ethical issues in the workplace caused by social media technologies
      • Self-assess your organization’s awareness and readiness to address the ethics
      • Recognize techniques to define policies to leverage your social media ethically

      This webinar is generously sponsored by Cummins.

      About the Presenter:

      Bill Fournet is an accomplished entrepreneur and takes the same innovative approach to his programs as he does to The Persimmon Group LLC, the company he founded in 2004 and leads today as CEO.

      Bill leads in the practice areas of business and workforce strategies, project and performance management and leadership development.  He consults clients ranging from Fortune 500 companies to small and mid-sized businesses in various industry verticals, including energy, financial services, aerospace, telecommunications, government and human resources.  Bill's experience in managing high-performance teams has directly influenced the unique business philosophy and atmosphere that has created one of the leading small businesses in our region today.

      Bill earned a Bachelor's degree from Vanderbilt University and a Master's degree from Oklahoma State University.

      Webinar: Project Management Fundamentals

      Project Management Fundamentals

      How successful are your projects? Do you find yourself fighting fires more often than preventing them? Most of us spend more time reacting to yesterday’s problems. Larry Winter’s webinar gets us back to the foundation of project management: core concepts that make or break our success. He will share the essentials of good project management that can be applied universally to projects of all sizes.

      Course Objectives:

      • Build understanding of project management concepts
      • Grow skills with proven project management techniques and tools while discovering best practices
      • Understand the project environment
      Course Outcomes:
      • Improved project delivery
      • Better management of expectations on project work
      • Acquired techniques that you can apply at work immediately
      Click here to register for this webinar. This webinar is generously sponsored by Booz Allen Hamilton.

      About the Presenter:

      Larry Winters is the project management practice leader for The Persimmon Group LLC, a leading provider of project management training and consulting services. Larry has managed multi-million dollar budgets for numerous Fortune 1000 companies, and has worked in leadership and project management roles for major corporations, such as J.B. Hunt Transport, Dollar Thrifty, Acxiom Corporation and Williams Companies.

      Larry is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP), and his professional experience ranges from creating large, next generation technology initiatives to small, frontline support projects and internal process improvement initiatives. Larry earned a Bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and his Master’s degree in information systems from the University of Arkansas.

      60th Anniversary Journal

      Coming in August 2011:

      Journal of the Society of Women Engineers, 60th Anniversary Edition

      During the Society of Women Engineers’ 60th anniversary celebration, an interdisciplinary group of scholars combed the Society’s archival collection. Applying the training and methods of social science and history, they brought a critical eye to the materials, teasing out of them many of the stories and insights hidden between the lines.


      Coming from various backgrounds, this select group produced a peer-reviewed volume to provide a deeper understanding of the status of women engineers, past and present. Grasping this larger context is key to creating a better future for women in the profession, and the profession overall.  

      The SWE Archives

      Located at Wayne State University’s Walter P. Reuther Library in Detroit, Mich., USA, the Society’s archives were established in 1957 by the Archives Committee, who voluntarily collected and maintained the Society’s records. In 1993, SWE designated the Walter P. Reuther Library as the official repository of its historical materials.


      The Archives tell the dynamic story of American women who, facing systemic resistance to female participation in the engineering profession, challenged gender stereotypes and promoted the rights of all individuals to pursue careers in science and engineering.


      Member Recruiting Toolkit

      Help promote SWE membership! 

      Access the membership toolkit from the Governance Documents under Membership by logging into swe.org, or visit the "Membership Toolkit Community" on MySWE Communities, where you can get resources and contribute your own! You'll find many tools to help you get started, including:

      • A Webinar on Building Membership
      • Guidelines on Building and Sustaining Membership through Social Media
      • SWE logos
      • Tips and informational articles
      • Examples for writing memos and surveys
      • Programs and Services Flyer
      • Member Brochures 
      • Online Membership Invitation

      Also, be sure to use the following resources to get started right away! 

      Send an E-vite

      Visit swe.org/recruit, where you can invite others in your network to join SWE!

      Programs and Services Flyer

      Promote the benefits of a SWE Membership with the programs and services flyers.

      SWE Member Brochures

      Pass out this informational membership brochure to your colleagues or classmates.

      About SWE - Leadership - Senate Mega Issues

      Senate Mega Issues Committee

      This committee performs the necessary research and develops the white papers to facilitate the senate's dialogue on mega issues. They also solicit ideas from SWE members for future mega issues. This Committee selects mega issues and prepares research on those issues including writing as many as three white papers a year in accordance with Senate Procedures.

      Examples of topics that the committee has been asked to have the senate discuss are:

      • How can women engineers be successful in the engineering workforce of 2020?  What will be the impact of the changing demographics of the engineering workforce?
      • How do we match the skills, interests, and capacities of our volunteers with the needs of SWE to create a satisfying partnership that will last throughout their lifecycle?
      • How can we empower women engineers to be successful on their own terms?

       

      Webinar: Skirt Strategies

      Skirt Strategies: The Intuition Model of 16 Feminine Traits

      Tuesday, September 13, 5:00 - 6:00 pm EST
      Click here to register.

      Have you ever wondered whether your leadership competency is innate, or whether your leadership competency is learned? The answer is both. And as a woman, you have more inherent ones than you would think. The problem is that in our technical worlds, we often see the “feminine” approach as the “inappropriate” approach. In this introduction to feminine leadership traits, we discuss the well-rounded toolkit (we actually call it a cosmetic bag) that women have of natural skills. Participants will have the opportunity to hear the 16 areas of competencies and perform a cursory self-assessment. Discussion will also include the overlapping theory of emotional intelligence and its implications on leadership. We will finish up with a few interactive strategies for women who lead well so you can immediately try them.

      The live webinar is accredited for .1 CEU credits.

      About the Speakers:

      Katie Snapp has been designing leadership and team-building workshops in industry, government, Fortune 500 companies and small businesses for over 20 years. Her experience in a production environment led her to realize the unique contributions that women offer to the workplace, yet also see the dilemma of being the minority in leadership.

      As a result, Snapp built a company that could serve women to grow professionally through cultivating tactical skills in communications, building and leading teams, supervising others, and managing beliefs about self. She has worked with such companies as Coca-Cola, Centex Homes, Northrop-Grumman, Commonwealth-Edison, and Bausch & Lomb, as well as senior levels of government, including the US Navy, and the US Air Force. Snapp’s involvement with a highly diversified group of clients and an initial career as an electrical engineer has led her to identify common themes and universal truths about the unique position that leaders hold as influencers in their businesses.

      Carol Wight is currently the CEO of a nonprofit organization but an entrepreneur at heart. She started her first business when she was 21, and has owned and operated businesses for more than 20 years. Wight managed over 150 employees at one time and thousands throughout her career, and has proudly promoted many women to leadership positions. She hates to see them struggle when given positions of leadership and authority, and knows first-hand about being a female leader and coaching others in leadership positions.

      In addition to being an entrepreneur, Wight is a certified Franklin Covey 7 Habits Facilitator as well as a True Colors, personality-based team-building facilitator.

      This webinar is generously sponsored by FM Global.

      Webinar: Women as Leaders

      Women as Leaders: What's Going On?

      Click here to listen to the replay of this webinar.

      It may have started with your mother’s generation, or maybe your grandmother’s, but chances are, you are early in a series of working women. You may not think this has much of an effect on you, but in reality it shapes your daily interactions. If you have ever bumped up against that pesky glass ceiling, you know the magnitude of the issue.

      Join us to discuss the fresh concept of Feminine Leadership for the 21st Century and what the latest trends are telling us. See why male-dominated work environments affect our comfort level in deploying natural female strengths and stifle our effectiveness. Learn of the statistics in the upsurge that is happening not just nationally, but globally. And find out why women are seen as powerful change agents in business decisions if and when their voices are heard around the board room table and around the office.

      Learning Objectives:

      • Learn the recent history of women in the workplace
      • Visit statistics on what is working well for us and what is not
      • Gain an understanding of how it is affecting today’s leading women
      • The Intuition Model: A platform for 16 natural leadership strengths for women
      • Discover four interactive strategies for women who lead well

      The live webinar is accredited for .1 CEU credits.

      About the Speakers:

      Katie Snapp has been designing leadership and team-building workshops in industry, government, Fortune 500 companies and small businesses for over 20 years. Her experience in a production environment led her to realize the unique contributions that women offer to the workplace, yet also see the dilemma of being the minority in leadership.

      As a result, Snapp built a company that could serve women to grow professionally through cultivating tactical skills in communications, building and leading teams, supervising others, and managing beliefs about self. She has worked with such companies as Coca-Cola, Centex Homes, Northrop-Grumman, Commonwealth-Edison, and Bausch & Lomb, as well as senior levels of government, including the US Navy, and the US Air Force. Snapp’s involvement with a highly diversified group of clients and an initial career as an electrical engineer has led her to identify common themes and universal truths about the unique position that leaders hold as influencers in their businesses.

      Carol Wight is currently the CEO of a nonprofit organization but an entrepreneur at heart. She started her first business when she was 21, and has owned and operated businesses for more than 20 years. Wight managed over 150 employees at one time and thousands throughout her career, and has proudly promoted many women to leadership positions. She hates to see them struggle when given positions of leadership and autho